How the World’s Energy Problem Has Been Hidden

We live in a world where words are very carefully chosen. Companies hire public relations firms to give just the right “spin” to what they are saying. Politicians make statements which suggest that everything is going well. Newspapers would like their advertisers to be happy; they certainly won’t suggest that the automobile you purchase today may be of no use to you in five years.

I believe that what has happened in recent years is that the “truth” has become very dark. We live in a finite world; we are rapidly approaching limits of many kinds. For example, there is not enough fresh water for everyone, including agriculture and businesses. This inadequate water supply is now tipping over into inadequate food supply in quite a few places because irrigation requires fresh water. This problem is, in a sense, an energy problem, because adding more irrigation requires more energy supplies used for digging deeper wells or making desalination plants. We are reaching energy scarcity issues not too different from those of World War I, World War II and the Depression Era between the wars.

We now live in a strange world filled with half-truths, not too different from the world of the 1930s. US newspapers leave out the many stories that could be written about rising food insecurity around the world, and even in the US. We see more reports of conflicts among countries and increasing gaps between the rich and the poor, but no one explains that such changes are to be expected when energy consumption per capita starts falling too low.

The majority of people seem to believe that all of these problems can be fixed simply by increasingly taxing the rich and using the proceeds to help the poor. They also believe that the biggest problem we are facing is climate change. Very few are even aware of the food scarcity problems occurring in many parts of the world already.

Our political leaders started down the wrong path long ago, when they chose to rely on economists rather than physicists. The economists created the fiction that the economy could expand endlessly, even with falling energy supplies. The physicists understood that the economy requires energy for growth, but didn’t really understand the financial system, so they weren’t in a position to explain which parts of economic theory were incorrect. Even as the true story becomes increasingly clear, politicians stick to their belief that our only energy problem is the possibility of using too much fossil fuel, with the result of rising world temperatures and disrupted weather patterns. This can be interpreted as a relatively distant problem that can be corrected over a fairly long future period.

In this post, I will explain why it appears to me that, right now, we are dealing with an energy problem as severe as that which seems to have led to World War I, World War II, and the Great Depression. We really need a solution to our energy problems right now, not in the year 2050 or 2100. Scientists modeled the wrong problem: a fairly distant energy problem which would be associated with high energy prices. The real issue is a very close-at-hand energy shortage problem, associated with relatively low energy prices. It should not be surprising that the solutions scientists have found are mostly absurd, given the true nature of the problem we are facing.

[1] There is a great deal of confusion with respect to which energy problem we are dealing with. Are we dealing with a near-at-hand problem featuring inadequate prices for producers or a more distant problem featuring high prices for consumers? It makes a huge difference in finding a solution, if any.

Business leaders would like us to believe that the problem to be concerned with is a fairly distant one: climate change. In fact, this is the problem most scientists are working on. There is a common misbelief that fossil fuel prices will jump to high levels if they are in short supply. These high prices will allow the extraction of a huge amount of coal, oil and natural gas from the ground. The rising prices will also allow high-priced alternatives to become competitive. Thus, it makes sense to start down the long road of trying to substitute “renewables” for fossil fuels.

If business leaders had stopped to look at the history of coal depletion, they would have discovered that expecting high prices when energy limits are encountered is incorrect. The issue that really happens is a wage problem: too many workers discover that their wages are too low. Indirectly, these low-wage workers need to cut back on purchases of goods of many types, including coal to heat workers’ homes. This loss of purchasing power tends to hold coal prices down to a level that is too low for producers. We can see this situation if we look at the historical problems with coal depletion in the UK and in Germany.

Coal played an outsized role in the time leading up to, and including, World War II.

Figure 1. Figure by author describing peak coal timing.

History shows that as early coal mines became depleted, the number of hours of labor required to extract a given amount of coal tended to rise significantly. This happened because deeper mines were needed, or mines were needed in areas where there were only thin coal seams. The problem owners of mines experienced was that coal prices did not rise enough to cover their higher labor costs, related to depletion. The issue was really that prices fell too low for coal producers.

Owners of mines found that they needed to cut the wages of miners. This led to strikes and lower coal production. Indirectly, other coal-using industries, such as iron production and bread baking, were adversely affected, leading these industries to cut jobs and wages, as well. In a sense, the big issue was growing wage disparity, because many higher-wage workers and property owners were not affected.

Today, the issue we see is very similar, especially when we look at wages worldwide, because markets are now worldwide. Many workers around the world have very low wages, or no wages at all. As a result, the number of workers worldwide who can afford to purchase goods that require large amounts of oil and coal products for their manufacture and operation, such as vehicles, tends to fall. For example, peak sales of private passenger automobile, worldwide, occurred in 2017. With fewer auto sales (as well as fewer sales of other high-priced goods), it is difficult to keep oil and coal prices high enough for producers. This is very similar to the problems of the 1914 to 1945 era.

Everything that I can see indicates that we are now reaching a time that is parallel to the period between 1914 and 1945. Conflict is one of the major things that a person would expect because each country wants to protect its jobs. Each country also wants to add new jobs that pay well.

In a period parallel to the 1914 to 1945 period, we can also expect pandemics. This happens because the many poor people often cannot afford adequate diets, making them more susceptible to diseases that are easily transmitted. In the Spanish Flu epidemic of 1918-1919, more than 50 million people worldwide died. The equivalent number with today’s world population would be about 260 million. This hugely dwarfs the 3.2 million COVID-19 deaths around the world that we have experienced to date.

[2] If we look at growth in energy supply, relative to the growth in population, precisely the same type of “squeeze” is occurring now as was occurring in the 1914 to 1945 period. This squeeze particularly affects coal and oil supplies.

Figure 2. The sum of red and blue areas on the chart represent average annual world energy consumption growth by 10-year periods. Blue areas represent average annual population growth percentages during these 10-year periods. The red area is determined by subtraction. It represents the amount of energy consumption growth that is “left over” for growth in people’s standards of living. Chart by Gail Tverberg using energy data from Vaclav Smil’s estimates shown in Energy Transitions: History, Requirements and Prospects, together with BP Statistical Data for 1965 and subsequent years.

The chart above is somewhat complex. It looks at how quickly energy consumption has been growing historically, over ten-year periods (sum of red and blue areas). This amount is divided into two parts. The blue area shows how much of this growth in energy consumption was required to provide food, housing and transportation to the growing world population, based on the standards at that time. The red area shows how much growth in energy consumption was “left over” for growth in the standard of living, such as better roads, more vehicles, and nicer homes. Note that GDP growth is not shown in the chart. It likely corresponds fairly closely to total energy consumption growth.

Figure 3, below, shows energy consumption by type of fuel between 1820 and 2010. From this, it is clear that the world’s energy consumption was tiny back in 1820, when most of the world’s energy came from burned biomass. Even at that time, there was a huge problem with deforestation.

Figure 3. World Energy Consumption by Source, based on Vaclav Smil estimates from Energy Transitions: History, Requirements and Prospects and together with BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy data for 1965 and subsequent years. (Wind and solar are included with biofuels.)

Clearly, the addition of coal, starting shortly after 1820, allowed huge changes in the world economy. But by 1910, this growth in coal consumption was flattening out, leading quite possibly to the problems of the 1914-1945 era. The growth in oil consumption after World War II allowed the world economy to recover. Natural gas, hydroelectric and nuclear have been added in recent years, as well, but the amounts have been less significant than those of coal and oil.

We can see how coal and oil have dominated growth in energy supplies in other ways, as well. This is a chart of energy supplies, with a projection of expected energy supplies through 2021 based on estimates of the IEA’s Global Energy Review 2021.

Figure 4. World energy consumption by fuel. Data through 2019 based on information from BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy 2020. Amounts for 2020 and 2021 based on percentage change estimates from IEA’s Global Energy Review 2021.

Oil supplies became a problem in the 1970s. There was briefly a dip in the demand for oil supplies as the world switched from burning oil to the use of other fuels in applications where this could easily be done, such as producing electricity and heating homes. Also, private passenger automobiles became smaller and more fuel efficient. There has been a continued push for fuel efficiency since then. In 2020, oil consumption was greatly affected by the reduction in personal travel associated with the COVID-19 epidemic.

Figure 4, above, shows that world coal consumption has been close to flat since about 2012. This is also evident in Figure 5, below.

Figure 5. World coal production by part of the world, based on data of BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy, 2020.

Figure 5 shows that coal production for the United States and Europe has been declining for a very long time, since about 1988. Before China joined the World Trade Organization (WTO) in 2001, its coal production grew at a moderate pace. After joining the WTO in 2001, China’s coal production grew very rapidly for about 10 years. In about 2011, China’s coal production leveled off, leading to the leveling of world coal production.

Figure 6 shows that recently, growth in the sum of oil and coal consumption has been lagging total energy consumption.

Figure 6. Three-year average annual increase in oil and coal consumption versus three-year average increase in total energy consumption, based on a combination of BP data through 2019 from BP’s Statistical Review of World Energy, 2010 and IEA’s 2020 and 2021 percentage change forecasts, from its Global Energy Review 2021.

We can see from Figure 6 that the only recent time when oil and coal supplies grew faster than energy consumption in total was during a brief period between 2002 and 2007. More recently, oil and coal consumption has been increasingly lagging total energy consumption. For both coal and oil, the problem has been that low prices for producers cause producers to voluntarily drop out of coal or oil production. The reason for this is two-fold: (1) With less oil (or coal) production, perhaps prices might rise, making production more profitable, and (2) Unprofitable oil (or coal) production isn’t really satisfactory for producers.

When determining the required level of profitability for these fuels, there is a need to include the tax revenue that governments require in order to maintain adequate services. This is especially the case with oil exporters, but it is also true in general. Energy products, to be useful, produce an energy surplus that can be used to benefit the rest of the economy. The way that this energy surplus can be transferred to the rest of the economy is by paying relatively high taxes. These taxes allow changes that aid economic growth, such as improvements in roads and schools.

If energy prices are chronically too low (so that an energy product requires a subsidy, rather than paying taxes), this is a sign that the energy product is most likely an energy “sink.” Such a product acts in the direction of pulling the economy down through ever-lower productivity.

[3] Governments have chosen to focus on preventing climate change because, in theory, the changes that are needed to prevent climate change seem to be the same ones needed to cover the contingency of “running out.” The catch is that the indicated changes don’t really work in the scarcity situation we are already facing.

It turns out that the very fuels that we seem to be running out of (coal and oil) are the very ones most associated with high carbon dioxide emissions. Thus, focusing on climate change seems to please everyone. Those who were concerned that we could keep extracting fossil fuels for hundreds of years and, because of this, completely ruin the climate, would be happy. Those who were concerned about running out of fossil fuels would be happy, as well. This is precisely the kind of solution that politicians prefer.

The catch is that we used coal and oil first because, in a very real sense, they are the “best” fuels for our needs. All of the other fuels, even natural gas, are in many senses inferior. Natural gas has the problem that it is very expensive to transport and store. Also, methane, which makes up the majority of natural gas, is itself a gas that contributes to global warming. It tends to leak from pipelines and from ships attempting to transport it. Thus, it is doubtful that it is much better from a global warming perspective than coal or oil.

So-called renewable fuels tend to be very damaging to the environment in ways other than CO2 emissions. This point is made very well in the new book Bright Green Lies by Derrick Jensen, Lierre Keith and Max Wilbert. It makes the point that renewable fuels are not an attempt to save the environment. Instead, they are trying to save our current industrial civilization using approaches that tend to destroy the environment. Cutting down forests, even if new trees are planted in their place, is especially detrimental. Alice Friedemann, in her new book, Life after Fossil Fuels: A Reality Check on Alternative Fuels, points out the high cost of these alternatives and their dependence on fossil fuel energy.

We are right now in a huge scarcity situation which is starting to cause conflicts of many kinds. Even if there were a way of producing these types of alternative energy cheaply enough, they are coming far too late and in far too small quantities to make a difference. They also don’t match up with our current coal and oil uses, adding a layer of time and expense for conversion that needs to be included in any model.

[4] What we really have is a huge conflict problem due to inadequate energy supplies for today’s world population. The powers that be are trying to hide this problem by publishing only their preferred version of the truth.

The situation that we are really facing is one that often goes under the name of “collapse.” It is a problem that many civilizations have faced in the past when a given population has outgrown its resource base.

Needless to say, the issue of collapse is not a story any politician wants to tell its citizens. Instead, we are told over and over, “Everything is fine. Any energy problem will be handled by the solutions scientists are finding.” The catch is that scientists were not told the correct problem to solve. They were told about a distant problem. To make the problem easier to solve, high prices and subsidies seemed to be acceptable. The problem they were asked to solve is very different from our real energy problem today.

Many people think that taxing the rich and giving the proceeds to the poor can solve our problem, but this doesn’t really solve the problem for a couple of reasons. One of the issues is that our scarcity issue is really a worldwide problem. Higher taxation of the rich in a few rich countries does nothing for the many problems of poor people in countries such as Lebanon, Yemen, Venezuela and India. Furthermore, taking money from the rich doesn’t really fix scarcity problems. Rich people don’t really eat a vastly disproportionate amount of food or drink more water, for example.

A detail that most of us don’t think about is that the military of many different countries has been very much aware of the potential conflict situation that is now occurring. They are aware that a “hot war” would require huge use of fossil fuel energy, so they have been trying to find alternative approaches. One approach military groups have been working on is the use of bioweapons of various kinds. In fact, some groups might even contemplate starting a pandemic. Another approach that might be used is computer viruses to disrupt the systems of other countries.

Needless to say, the powers that be do not want the general population to hear about issues of these kinds. We find ourselves with narrower and narrower news reports that provide only the version of the truth that politicians and news media want us to read. Citizens who have developed the view, “All I need to do to find out the truth is read my home town newspaper,” are likely to encounter more and more surprises, as conflict situations escalate.

About Gail Tverberg

My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
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3,735 Responses to How the World’s Energy Problem Has Been Hidden

  1. StarvingLion says:

    Eddy, I found a 4 minute video that insinuates that the inventor of the PCR, Kary Mullis, was murdered (“died of pneumonia at age 74”) by the elders for speaking out. Is Kary Mullis the ‘Gus Grissom’ of COVID?

    The Mysterious Death of Dr. Fauci’s Most Notable Critic

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/CctBOsZ0oh7G/

    • StarvingLion says:

      Kary Banks Mullis (December 28, 1944 – August 7, 2019) was an American biochemist. In recognition of his invention of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, he shared the 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Michael Smith[4]

      Mullis died of pneumonia[1] on August 7, 2019 at age 74 in Newport Beach, California

      [Gee, what a coincidence he dies right before the initial outbreak only a few months later]

      The outbreak was first reported to the local government on 27 December 2019 and published on 31 December. On 8 January 2020, a new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was identified as the cause of the pneumonia by Chinese scientists.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      I imagine his body was cremated as well.

      • StarvingLion says:

        This dude says he was forced to fake his own death. Makes sense, as I believe the elders don’t kill nobel prize winners.

        https://pieceofmindful.com/2020/05/14/what-i-have-learned-thus-far/

        Dr. Kary Mullis, inventor of the PCR machine, most likely under duress, faked his death last August. He was a vocal opponent of use of his invention to identify carriers of HIV. Prior to this long-planned pandemic, it was understood he had to leave the scene by one means or another. They tell us he died of pneumonia, a sick joke.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          I am somewhat skeptical of this blog’s accuracy. I haven’t been following it, however.

  2. Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
    Gail Tverberg says:

    The WSJ is reporting:

    Are Vaccinated Americans Powering the Economy? Not Yet, Data Show
    People who haven’t received the Covid-19 vaccine are more likely to be out spending

    The vaccinated are “proceeding with cautious optimism,” said Derrick Fung, chief executive of Cardify. “They’re still not really comfortable doing live entertainment where there’s crowds of people.”

    People who aren’t vaccinated, on the other hand, tend to be more risk tolerant and are already living a relatively normal life, Mr. Fung added. “As places open up, they’re the ones leading the charge.”

    My observation is that when the decree came out that the fully vaccinated no longer needed to wear masks, the people who have no intention of being vaccinated were more than happy to take off their masks as well.

    I have talked to some of my vaccinated relatives. Some of them are still unwilling to visit restaurants, at all.

  3. StarvingLion says:

    Where are all the snitches? Surely, there should be lots of them who worked at NASA spilling the beans about the Mars baloney and such? Or on other mass deceptions. I thought they would come out of wood work in droves with this vaxxine crap. The oil is gone, they probably got a delayed time kill-shot by now…and still next to nothing in regards to juicy tidbits. Except for the videos on the pedo cabal stuff and whatnot that is kind of obvious…

    Instead we get a steady diet of Tenpenny and Yeadon. Maybe they are a part of the PR team.

    • at least a few more years until the “oil is gone”, and probably a decade or two. Where are the millions dead from the vaccines? Before it gets to 10 million or 100 million, it needs to get to one million first. It’s about time to see some action.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      “Where are all the snitches?”

      That is a question in the back of my mind as well. It is incredibly hard to keep a big secret for many years.

      • NomadicBeer says:

        This is what has made me very conspiracy averse – until last year.

        There are so many conspiracies that have been revealed and yet most people continue to believe.
        Think about “grains/sugar are good for you”, “fat makes you fat”, “high cholesterol causes heart attacks”, “US is spreading democracy”, “Democrats are helping black people”, “electric cars are green”, “big corporations are creating jobs” and so on…

        I could go on the whole day. All of the above are easily disproven by looking at peer reviewed research and historical data. And yet there are plenty of people that still believe them.

        So the question is not about the difficulty to keep a secret. Even if Apollo astronauts would admit in public it was a hoax, all believers would continue to believe.

        Honestly, if I was part of any of this conspiracies, I would probably not say anything. There really are no upsides for whistleblowers and in general people turn against them for ruining their delusions.

        That being said, I wish people would think before jumping to the opposite extreme and accepting everything that is labeled a conspiracy (no, Earth is not flat and viruses do exist).

        In general, it’s easy to lie to people about point events – things that are localized in space and time. Think 9/11 or Apollo missions or specialized medical theories like the above.

        It’s much harder to maintain a lie about events that last – think about the reasons for the Iraq war or nuclear power or Earth being a sphere.

        As for the scamdemic – it’s in a category of its own.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Agreed!

  4. Hahaha…

    Long Slide Looms for World Population, With Sweeping Ramifications
    Damien Cave, Emma Bubola and Choe Sang-Hun
    Mon, May 24, 2021, 7:49 AM
    Sabrie/The New York Times)

    All over the world, countries are confronting population stagnation and a fertility bust, a dizzying reversal unmatched in recorded history that will make first-birthday parties a rarer sight than funerals, and empty homes a common eyesore.

    Maternity wards are already shutting down in Italy. Ghost cities are appearing in northeastern China. Universities in South Korea cannot find enough students, and in Germany, hundreds of thousands of properties have been razed, with the land turned into parks.

    Like an avalanche, the demographic forces — pushing toward more deaths than births — seem to be expanding and accelerating. Although some countries continue to see their populations grow, especially in Africa, fertility rates are falling nearly everywhere else. Demographers now predict that by the latter half of the century or possibly earlier, the global population will enter a sustained decline for the first time.

    See the CEP is going on schedule Fast Eddy….
    PS. Jesus has already came back per Sam Kinnison as a Game Show Host

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=98Z4AQVqPhA

    Who else gets to give away the store as a job!?

    • “in Germany, hundreds of thousands of properties have been razed, with the land turned into parks.”

      Smart. In England they are trashing the countryside to build hundreds of thousands of new ‘homes’ per year. It is a real shambles and the place is turning into a serious dump.

      Tories are a front for the CBI, which funds them, and all that they care about is getting more workers to make more money for the share holders, and to service the structural debt.

      The ‘plebs’ keep voting for them, and TP has an 18% lead in the polls. LP is no better. UK is a complete write off. At least the country still has that silly ‘queen’ and some flags to wave.

      • Here in the Sunshine State of Florida there is an invasion from both the North east and West coast of exodus and causing great upheaval in congestion and price wars for real estate….
        During the past few months, many people from around the country have decided to move to Florida. Large groups of people are leaving New York and California. Both states have experienced a drop in population for numerous reasons. Whether higher taxes or rising crime rates, these individuals are leaving and moving to other states. Many of them are traveling to the beautiful state of Florida.

        Hahahahaha 😉. Sure, South Florida is just great….everything one could want….some on down…
        Crazy right now, a family place their home on the market and within days had offers above the asking price along with a cash offer. Not too many properties list in my neighborhood…
        Yep, if you enjoy traffic gridlock, rapid highrise density projects, nasty litter all over the streets and extremely hot temperatures and hurricanes that cause your home insurance rate to be unaffordable…this is the place for you

    • Robert Firth says:

      Unmatched in recorded history? Exactly that happened after the Fall of the Roman Empire, as contemporary historians documented in detail. And exactly that outcome of civilisational collapse was predicted by Oswald Spengler in 1922.

      But then, this is the New York Times.

  5. StarvingLion says:

    Oil has been up the past 2 days but oil stocks are not responding. Silver up.

    Vancouver gasoline prices are near all-time highs despite WTI nowhere near 100 as in the past.

    This hyperinflation meme still looks like grand fraud to me. A more likely outcome is another oil flash crash.

    • StarvingLion says:

      Stock Market collapse in July is obvious. WTI since 2008 has lower peaks, 75 should not be exceeded. Lumber should double top by July. DXY around 83. Margin Debt will peak by then too.

      WTI peak at July driving season followed by massive crash to negative.

      Willing Vaxxed dumbshits by july probably peaked by then too.

      • I’m calling October but you could be right!

        • StarvingLion says:

          I think the only criterion for determining a broad stock market top is “willing” vaxxination percentage. Surely, that will peak by end of year So you are right, October or even December is much more likely than July simply for the reason they will hold the stock market collapse until vax #’s are peak.

          Once the sheep are vaxxed, then comes the stock market collapse.

          • I think the stock markets will be higher 1/1/2022 than they are now. “They” can continue to manipulate the secondary financial economy and keep markets up. Though by propping up the markets, they will certainly weaken other financial areas, so probably weaker USD and higher inflation which Shadowstats says is now about 11%.

    • Agreed. Transitory inflation leading to a crash, not transitory inflation leading to either (a) stabilized growth, or (b) hyperinflation.

      To get hyperinflation governments would need to change CB laws which limit their activities. Borrowing money is not printing money. QE is not inflationary, and stimulus peters out after a quarter or two.

      The FED cheifly influences sentiment, not reality. I think the key question is:

      How long can people remain broadly optimistic?

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        “How long can people remain broadly optimistic?”

        I think that that is a good point. As long as people have faith that everything will soon turn out fine, the stock market has a chance at staying fairly high and oil prices are unlikely to fall very low.

        But once it becomes clear that all of the “chits” have been played in this game, and it still isn’t working, then the system has to crash.

        • Dennis L. says:

          Gail,

          Is it possible chits have three uses, but we shall look at two.

          1. Store of value: what is the alternative to stocks/real estate, e.g. a home?

          2. Transactions are tough in stocks to real goods, without a sale of a security, there is no “chit” for a transaction.

          Which wins depends on who has deeper pockets. Most stocks are apparently owned by wealthy people, they sell for liquidity only, they really have no option other than the market unless..,…

          They are Elon, going to the moon, mine nuggets of CU and find an island in the S. Pacific upon which to land them.

          Interesting calculation would be the total amount of energy required to mine current CU ore, refine it and ship it to a destination compared to dropping a similar amount from the moon – a guess is they are getting close to being equal. Factor in externalities and the moon wins. The earth is finite and the dump part of the earth is getting larger than the source part.

          Dennis L.

  6. Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
    Gail Tverberg says:

    What could go wrong?

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/issuance-of-bundles-of-risky-loans-jumps-to-16-year-high-11621849782

    Issuance of Bundles of Risky Loans Jumps to 16-Year High

    A recovering economy, demand from yield-starved investors boost collateralized loan obligations

    Sales of securities backed by bundles of risky corporate loans are hitting records, lifted by a recovering economy and demand from yield-starved investors.

    Issuance of new collateralized loan obligations, which buy up loans to companies with junk credit ratings and package them into securities, totaled over $59 billion as of May 20, according to data from S&P Global Market Intelligence’s’ LCD. That is the highest ever figure for that period in data going back to 2005.

    The prospect of rising inflation and a shift away from the Federal Reserve’s easy money policies are making bonds tied to so-called CLOs attractive to a wider range of investors, analysts said. Many are expecting strong growth to prompt Fed tightening, eroding returns on corporate bonds. Yields on CLO bonds typically rise with interest rates.

    The CLO market’s record sales pace marks a reversal from this time last year, when pandemic fears caused debt prices to plummet, freezing sales of new funds. Support from the Fed, including cutting interest rates to near zero and buying the highest-quality bonds from certain types of CLOs, has since helped bring investors back.

    • I’ve been trying to understand this CLO product. Apparently these are bundled in “trenches” of riskier/moderate/safe levels which is advertised as a sort of circuit breaker. I guess we’ll see.

      There is also the general problem with collateral: No matter how safe it may be, when everybody wants to sell at the same time there is no market.

      What happened in the GFC in part was that if only a few of the underlying assets go bust then the MBS (or CLO’s) can no longer be used as a risk free asset in the repo markets. Which implies demand/value quickly goes to zero. There may be some pension funds holding these for the long term return, but banks primarily use these kinds of assets as part of interbank collateral.

    • foamroller says:

      gail, don’t forget that the first level of securitization performed fine during the financial crisis. i.e., CLOs then were perceived to be in the same boat as CDOs but in fact actually worked as designed to spread out the risk. it was only the CDOs (which were like CLOs of CMBS and RMBS, not high leverage corporates) and “CDO squared” (i.e., CDOs of CDOs) and “synthetic CDOs” (CDOs of credit default swaps) which blew up massively, and even those, only with respect to a certain vintage (~post 2005 or so). further, the banks were holding these CDOs in massive sizes on their balance sheets. today’s world is far different. there is instability for sure, but probably not from these CLOs of leveraged loans.

  7. Yoshua says:

    The measle vaccine is safe and just as effective against Covid as the Covid vax with a 40% efficiency. That’s why children are safe against Covid?

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33972940/

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      The article makes it sound like the T-Cell immunity provided by the measles vaccine is also somewhat helpful against the virus that causes COVID-19.

      • geno mir
        geno mir says:

        It is called cell immunity. This is the Holly grail of immunity. It is longlasting, easy to prop up and always working. All approved C19 vaccines cause antibody immunity which does not have long lasting effect, once exhausted can’t be propped up or wined back (like a one trick pony). Interesting fact is that cell immunity is both specific (towards specific pathogen) and general (provides defense towards pathogens that the individual is yet to meet).

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Thanks! This whole charade makes less and less sense.

  8. Fast Eddy says:

    ” I think we are eventually headed into a hyperinflationary economic collapse. It’s not that we haven’t been in an economic collapse already, we are coming back some now. . . . The Fed has been creating money at a pace that has never been seen before. You are basically up 75% (in money creation) year over year. This is unprecedented. Normally, it might be up 1% or 2% year over year. The exploding money supply will lead to inflation. I am not saying we are going to get to 75% inflation—yet, but you are getting up to the 4% or 5% range, and you are soon going to be seeing 10% range year over year. . . . The Fed has lost control of inflation.”

    https://usawatchdog.com/inflation-implosion-hyperinflation-in-2022-john-williams/

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Thanks for a link to a very fine article. I think his analysis is likely right. Of course, the hyperinflation problem still doesn’t fix our materials problem.

      • My base case is inflation in the 5% range leading to political pressure to taper or raise rates early. I think this would crash the markets and undercut economic recovery. If our response to this is to rewrite the rules of central banks we will get hyperinflation somewhere. Borrowing money is not the same as printing money, so there is at least one step that has to happen first and it could go either way.

        • StarvingLion says:

          If they wanted hyperinflation there would be no need for experimental “vaccines”, oil flash crashes, dow flash crash, attack on crypto, etc.

          And there is no “our”. Gov is broke. No usable local oil.

          • Jan says:

            If Nato manages to get a hand on the Caspian Oil and the Irak/Iran-Ressources it might go for some years with the hand brake on. Venezuela will be added.

            Those that has the hand on the last resources can still go to war when others cant. Putin has understood, the USA and Europe would be offended if you tell them. But some military might not.

            What astonishes me more is the growing dependency on semiconductors, which is not a resisilient technology in my eyes.

            • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
              Gail Tverberg says:

              When semiconductors require rare earth minerals, and nearly all of the processing capability is in China, there is a bottleneck in the semiconductor industry that will hit every country except China and whichever countries it favors. We cannot depend on semiconductors for growth in technology, I am afraid.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          However the situation ends up, it can’t end up well.

          We need a different bottleneck to go through now, rather than the COVID-19 one. Going back to “normal growth” is not an option.

        • Sam says:

          Yes we have not seen money printing yet

    • Xabier says:

      ‘Lost control’ ……by design?

      Anything that crushes US will delight them.

      They believe that the economy is infinitely manipulable, it’s their fundamental assumption.

      On the other hand, a classic psychopath will manipulate in pursuit of total control until things do, in fact, escape their grasp.

      This is embodied in the classic Iranian legend of the Emperor Jamshid, which I have quoted before.

      He thought that he was God, rich and all-seeing, growing ever- more corrupt, and then found out that he wasn’t.

    • sorpefjord
      sorpefjord says:

      Elon Musk will manage an energy-wonder. Energy harvested on Mars, hahaha. And than we will all meet in this future:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MLNfcZ01mHA

      Saludos

      el mar

  9. Jarle says:

    Denmark:

    People tested for SARS-COV-2 last 24 hours: 162639
    Positive tests: 835
    % positive: 0.51

    0.51 %?! And the false positive rate is? What a stupid stupid world!

    https://www.dr.dk/nyheder/indland/status-paa-coronavirus-lige-nu

  10. Fast Eddy says:

    Canada could see a resurgence of COVID-19 cases even if the country manages to fully vaccinate a majority of its population, according to experts.

    University of Saskatchewan epidemiologist Nazeem Muhajarine told Global News on Friday that the possibility of new or existing variants of COVID-19 spreading throughout Canada could lead to a possible resurgence in new cases.

    As an example, Muhajarine pointed to the small East African island nation of Seychelles which had at least 60 per cent of its population fully vaccinated with either the Sinopharm or AstraZeneca vaccines.

    With the majority of that country’s population having already had two shots, the island nation decided to open its borders to tourism — an industry it heavily relied on. That opening, according Muhajarine, eventually resulted in another surge of the virus that was “driven by variants.”

    “So you know, we are seeing these cases of countries seeing a resurgence of the virus, and they in fact have lots of people fully vaccinated — and we will see that too, we will see that going forward,” he said.

    https://globalnews.ca/news/7883901/covid-19-resurgence-full-vaccination/

    Oh — so Bossche and Montagnier are correct — the vaccines are creating variants….

    • Tim Groves says:

      Over sixty percent fully vaccinated. Over seventy percent partially vaccinated. Jabs began in January, big spike in cases and deaths began in May.

      The Seychelles have two seasons: when the north-west monsoon blows, it has a humid, hot and rainy season, and this occurs between November and April. While when the southeast monsoon blows there is the cool and dry season which corresponds to the months between May and October.

      Interestingly, flu virus survives better in cold weather because it has a protective gel-like coating that allows it to survive in the air and be passed from person to person; this coating degrades in warm temperatures.

      Of the four human coronaviruses that cause colds and other respiratory diseases, three have “marked winter seasonality,” with few or no detections in the summer, molecular biologist Kate Templeton, also at the University of Edinburgh, concluded in a 2010 analysis of 11,661 respiratory samples collected between 2006 and 2009. These three viruses essentially behave like the flu.

      Based on the above, one would predict that SARS-Cov2 infections would tend to become more of a problem in the Seychelles when the colder, dryer weather arrives in May. Which is what seems to have happened.

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Good point! Now that it is summer in the US and Europe, cases should be receding, whether or not the vaccines have any effectiveness.

        • This is why I suspect that things will become even more stupid during this year’s cold and flu season.

          Possible scenario:

          1. People foolish enough to have taken the shot experience Antibody Dependent Enhancement (ADE) when confronted with the seasonal cold and flu viruses (or something else released by our overlords).

          2. Government tells everyone that it’s really SARS-CoV-2 (or a variant) that’s causing widespread illness.

          3. This would be the “second pandemic” referenced by Bill Gates during one of his interviews – the one which would cause everyone to take notice.

          4. Government doubles-down on mandating “vaccination” for SARS-CoV-2. Consequences for declining the injections become more severe (e.g. quarantine camps, anyone?).

          5. “Vaccine” uptake increases to some extent for the following reasons:

          – Everyone will know someone who became ill and/or died during cold and flu season. “The media must be telling the truth about COVID-19 in 2021 as my grandma died from it and my sister and her children became severely ill from it. All of them had been vaccinated but I just can’t put two and two together for myself.”
          In truth, the new pandemic will have been caused by ADE, courtesy of the shots.

          – Remaining holdouts begin to succumb to the stick rather than the carrot.

  11. Fast Eddy says:

    Taiwan reports 595 new infections

    Covid-19 tally on the island reaches 4,917 cases and 29 deaths with 334 new local cases, five new imported cases and 256 cases delayed by a reporting backlog.

    https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy/article/3134612/coronavirus-taiwan-reports-334-local-cases-island-hits-out-who

    Fake? Real? Product of Vaccinations?

    Who the hell knows — the gaslighting is epic

    • Tim Groves says:

      We know, it’s the jabs. The same pattern is playing out almost everywhere.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        I bet GFB is not celebrating being right….

        This is coming along nicely now… happening on the timeline GVB said it would …

        Time for The Poem:

        Turning and turning in the widening gyre
        The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
        Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
        Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
        The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
        The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
        The best lack all conviction, while the worst
        Are full of passionate intensity.

        Surely some revelation is at hand;
        Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
        The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
        When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
        Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
        A shape with lion body and the head of a man,
        A gaze blank and pitiless as the sun,
        Is moving its slow thighs, while all about it
        Reel shadows of the indignant desert birds.
        The darkness drops again; but now I know
        That twenty centuries of stony sleep
        Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle,
        And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
        Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

        The horror… The horror tee hee… we all get to die soon… tee hee hee… even the children

        It’s so much better to die .. knowing everyone else dies too .. so you don’t miss out on anything!!!

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          We really don’t know whether a Second Coming is at hand. I would give the Second Coming a higher probability than salvation from the Green New Deal.

      • Xabier says:

        The wave of deaths in care homes played out the same way, too, in several places.

        We look forward to hearing from you about Japan now they are getting into the swing with jabbing.

        Dolores Cahill has been fully vindicated.

    • Bei Dawei says:

      Yes, it’s been about 300-something per day for the last 9 or 10 days. The numbers have been steady so far. It will be interesting to see what direction they trend in after a few weeks more.

      Although there are no lockdowns per se, you see very few people on the streets these days. Masks are required outdoors, or in public places, although I occasionally spot somebody without one. (There is a steep fine.) Schools have switched to virtual instruction. Restaurants have switched to take-away. There are restrictions on the size of gatherings. My own extended family is over the limit, so we have dinner separately now.

      They say we’re getting 5 million doses of Moderna this June. That’s enough to vaccinate about 1/4 of the adult population. I’m in the tenth priority group (the over-50s), so I suppose that will be my cue.

  12. Fast Eddy says:

    OH NO!!!!

    Victoria records four new community COVID-19 cases in Melbourne’s northern suburbs

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-05-24/victoria-four-covid-19-cases-in-melbourne-north/100160012

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      What a surprise! The saga goes on and on.

  13. Fast Eddy says:

    I suspect we won’t be seeing any anti-vax material from Dr K… understandable — why lose your job when making a stand is futile….

    They are not alone, and things have got far worse, in the last year or so. Science has taken a terrible battering with COVID19, I have always known that dissent against a widely held scientific hypothesis is difficult.

    Just trying to get published is a nightmare. The peer-review system is one of the many weapons used against innovative thinking. ‘Let’s see what the current experts think of this new idea which threatens to overturn everything they have researched and taught over the last thirty years, and have built their reputations on… I wonder if they will like it, and approve it?’

    Experts certainly create a formidable barrier to change. As described by David Sackett (a founding father of evidence-based medicine) in his article ‘The sins of expertness and a proposal for redemption.’

    ‘….It then dawned on me that experts like me commit two sins that retard the advance of science and harm the young. Firstly, adding our prestige to our opinions gives the latter far greater persuasive power than they deserve on scientific grounds alone. Whether through deference, fear, or respect, others tend not to challenge them, and progress towards the truth is impaired in the presence of an expert.

    The second sin of expertness is committed on grant applications and manuscripts that challenge the current expert consensus. Reviewers face the unavoidable temptation to accept or reject new evidence and ideas, not on the basis of their scientific merit, but on the extent to which they agree or disagree with the public positions taken by experts on these matters.’ 1

    And his proposal:

    ‘But there are still far more experts around than is healthy for the advancement of science. Because their voluntary retirement does not seem to be any more frequent in 2000 than it was in 1980, I repeat my proposal that the retirement of experts be made compulsory at the point of their academic promotion and tenure.’

    Expertise is great. ‘Experts’… well, that is a completely different matter. We certainly have a few formidable ones kicking about with COVID19. In the UK we have the great and good of the SAGE committee made up of – who knows? – chosen for whatever reasons. They wield enormous power, and never disagree on anything. In the US we have Fauci and the CDC. Ditto.

    In the background we have the WHO … who can tell you what way the wind is blowing if nothing else. They remind me of Groucho Marx’s famous comment. ‘These are my principles. And you if you don’t like them…. I have others.’ However, we at the WHO would like to make it clear that nothing about COVID19 has anything to do with China, in any way. Can we have more money please?

    Anyway, where are we with COVID19, and science?

    In my opinion COVID19 succeeded in breaking my last vestiges of faith in medical scientific research. I cannot believe anything I read. I accept no mainstream facts or figures.

    We are told such utter nonsense. For example, the ‘fact. that vaccination protects against COVID19 more effectively than having had the disease itself… This is just utter nonsense.

    We were told that COVID19 was spread by touching contaminated surfaces… Really? We were told it spread though droplets, not aerosols. Which is the most complete garbage. We were told that everyone has to wear a mask. We were told it could easily be passed on by asymptomatic people. Based on nothing at all. I could go on.

    Yet, no-one seems remotely bothered by any of this utter nonsense. The public seem to lap it up, and attack anyone who questions the current narrative. I feel that I am clinging onto a dying religion. The religion of Francis Bacon and the enlightenment.

    https://drmalcolmkendrick.org/2021/05/24/covid19-the-end-of-scientific-discussion/

    • Xabier says:

      He’s not quite right, there, as Francis bacon was obsessed with scientific research being the route to poltical power, domination of Nature and, of course, eternal life: ie the Transhumanist project.

      We are in fact being force-fed with the latest poisoned and corrupted fruits of the tree which he planted.

      Narcissism and psychopathy have been inherent in science since the very beginning, woven as they are in all things human, even those ideologies which dream of transcendng humanity.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Thanks for the comments. We all discover that the published “truth” and the real truth seem to diverge more and more widely. I don’t remember hearing Groucho Marx’s famous comment, ‘These are my principles. And you if you don’t like them…. I have others.’

      The Federal Reserve keeps telling us that it has more and more techniques it can come up to help save the financial system. At some point, this will be proven false.

  14. Thierry Chassine
    Thierry says:

    That was an ordinary Sunday lunch, yesterday.
    My stepfather who is vaccinated expects everybody to do the same. I was the only one around the table to refuse the jab and he became angry toward me.
    My wife is pregnant and has taken the jab too. She is a nurse and her father is a physician.
    They told me that the vaccination should be mandatory because the believe only then they will find their freedom again.
    I didn’t want to go into details and just answered that it was personal choice but no one seemed to understand.

    It’s easy to laugh at covidiots, but now they are everywhere. They are our families and friends.
    I don’t know where we are going but much damage has already been done. Our society is ready to fall into totalitarianism. That’s how it is.

    • D. Stevens says:

      Every radio station around here runs commercials which say “This is our best ‘shot’ for getting back to normal” with endorsements from nurses. I’ve never seen such a media blitz promoting anything except maybe the run up to the Iraq war. Told my boyfriend I’m unsure about the risks vs benefits of getting the vaccine and he said there were no risks and joked about if I was worried it would impact my fertility knowing I’m sterile. I’m unsure what to do other than avoid the subject and wonder what negative impact there might be later. All my co-workers, friends, and most of my family have taken it leaving me one of the last holdouts.

      • Artleads says:

        Can’t/shouldn’t give anyone advise on such divisive issues, but can speak for myself. There no way anyone on planet earth was going to get me to willingly submit to taking ANY vaccination of ANY kind. There’s no way anyone on planet earth anyone was going to get me to trust Bill Gates or the MSM about anything divisive ether.

    • Xabier says:

      Rather saddening to read that, it must be very painful.

      A year of psychological torture and then the promise of’ normality’ and ‘freedom’, and it’s no wonder they have ceased to reason and reflect.

      The planners are, of course, very cynically setting us against one another, just as families divided in Spain during the Civil War.

  15. Fast Eddy says:

    Government caught out by legal ruling on vaccine rollout announces law change

    A New Zealand High Court judge is siding with campaigners who say the government’s rollout of the covid vaccine is “problematic”.

    Nga Kaitiaki Tuku Ihu Medical Action Society Incorporated, represented in court by lawyer Sue Grey, challenged the Minister of Health in the High Court at Wellington last week.

    Grey said the Ministry’s provisional authorisation of the Pfizer covid vaccine – under section 23 of the Medicines Act – was designed for emergency use only, so a new drug could be given to a limited number of people who were out of options for fully approved treatments.

    This section of the law was not to be used for the rushed roll out of untested drugs to the whole population.

    Judge Rebecca Ellis said: “…It is reasonably arguable that the decision to provisionally approve the vaccine for much wider use [all New Zealanders] is problematic”.

    Having been caught out, the government reacted to the judgment saying it will change the law so untested drugs can be given freely. All covid vaccines are still in the trial phase (which ends in 2023).

    Health Minister Andrew Little says the Government is making an urgent amendment to “modernise the law”, and said section 23 had been used over 40 years to grant early access to approved medicines when there was public good.

    Sue Grey says the judge had agreed that everyone in New Zealand over 16 is not a limited number of patients.

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/covid-19-coronavirus-govt-makes-urgent-law-change-after-high-court-ruling-on-legality-of-vaccine-rollout/IWB53LM2XNNFMOK44DSGN66JEU/

    Oh ok … that’s that then hahaha

    • Tim Groves says:

      A good old-fashioned independent judge! You don’t hear about them very often these days.

    • D. Stevens says:

      Wasn’t there a judge who made a similar ‘problematic’ ruling in Germany recently? Her home was raided shortly afterwards for being a covidiot.

    • Xabier says:

      They are also – and in other countries too – changing the rules so that minors can give consent to being jabbed, bypassing parental consent,

      First indoctrinate the poor little buggers at school, telling them that vaccines are good and good people take them, and then we can all get back to normal, then ask them about being vaccinated.

      In Wales, the womanish old creep who runs the place says that masks will have to stay on kids over 12 until they get jabbed. In other words, torture and blackmail.

      In the UK, ‘school leaders’ (aka headteachers) aren’t opposing the injection drive.

      The number of little non-entities just eager to join in is appalling. Drinks all round at the ‘Elders’ Club’ in Switzerland ( ie the BIS).

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      I notice that it is a female judge who had the courage to speak out on the subject. Women seem to be playing a prominent role in the discussions of what happened, what went wrong, how we are being misled and Fauci’s questionable past. Perhaps women don’t feel quite as bound by convention. They are less likely to “get ahead” in the conventional system, regardless. Saying something that will be unpopular with leaders will not be quite the blow to their careers as it might be to a man saying the same thing.

      • Xabier says:

        I think you are right about that, Gail.

        The journalist Anna Brees here in the UK started out trying to be an impartial reporter, and is now trying to organise resistance to masks and vaccinations in schools.

        She claims to have some celebrities ready to speak out.

      • Student says:

        I agree with you. I think women can play an important role on this discussion. I hope they will make their voice heard. For instance, in Italy, Ginevra Cerrina Feroni, vice-president of the Italian Private Information Authority (the Pubblic Institution for protecting private information) has pubblished a document saying that green pass is not valid without a specific law approving it. In other words it can’t be done by the Government alone. I don’t know if it is enough, but at least it is an important voice trying to stop this rush.

        Please see here:
        https://www.garanteprivacy.it/home/docweb/-/docweb-display/docweb/9550463

        And also there is another woman, a Lawyer, Alessandra Devetag, who has started a campaign to stop future Covid child vaccination at school, which is something they are trying to organize in September 2021.
        She is chief lawyer for Coordinamento internazionale Associazioni per la tutela dei diritti dei minori (C.I.A.T.D.M.). This Institution can be translated like: International Coordination of Associations for protecting children’s rights.

        Please see here:

        https://www.byoblu.com/2021/05/06/vogliono-arruolare-i-super-eroi-per-vaccinare-i-minori-a-scuola-la-diffida-del-ciatdm/

  16. Fast Eddy says:

    I take that back – after watching the video I am SURE this could land on the moon!

    https://youtu.be/eipgk-8TJt0

  17. Fast Eddy says:

    Isn’t it odd that there is a market for sea level homes….. who would pay this sort of cash for a house that will soon be underwater?

    https://www.sothebysrealty.com/eng/sales/the-hamptons-ny-area

  18. Basically everyone is telling the IEA to go do one.

    > Member countries push back against IEA’s net zero road map

    Japan and Australia have disputed the findings of the International Energy Agency’s report on reaching net zero emissions by 2050, indicating they will continue fossil fuel investment despite the watchdog’s advice.

    The push back from member countries — traditionally big fossil fuel consumers — and global energy producers, highlights the controversy surrounding the IEA’s recommendations which include halting fossil fuel exploration and spending on new projects.

    While the IEA has said there is a need to continue investing in already discovered deposits and existing projects, critics say the body does not adequately acknowledge the risks to future energy security, and fails to provide a backstop should the world not manage to create adequate low-carbon alternatives to replace fossil fuels.

    …. Several energy associations criticised the report: the World Nuclear Association called it “highly impractical” and the World Coal Association said it was unrealistic.

    The International Gas Union warned that the road map could present a serious risk to energy security. “We would see significant disruption in power supplies, transportation systems . . . and significant rise in energy taxes,” said Andy Calitz, secretary-general of the IGU.

    Meanwhile, large oil and gas companies expressed scepticism over whether the steps outlined in the report would be implemented….

    https://www.ft.com/content/4bbae4a3-cf1f-4a09-9fe5-bf2dc2ee2c9c

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Glad to hear that the IEA is getting push back.

  19. Fast Eddy says:

    What he misses is the agenda… why would ‘they’ try to frighten people? Why offer then a solution to a problem that is no different from a bad flu … that involves and experimental vaccine

    It’s so bloody obvious what is going on … how can these people not see it?

    https://youtu.be/43J7hD9I0jY

    • StarvingLion says:

      Eddy, I have an IQ of 50, watched lots of mainstream TV, ate tons of junk food, drank alcohol, …and yet I see right through this and the moon landing as completely obvious nonsense…

      I have no talent, dumb as a rock, laziest person in the world. I’m loaded with genetic problems: bad skin, teeth, eye sight, …

      It can’t be stupidity, brainwashing, exposure to toxins, etc.

      What is it?

    • Xabier says:

      I think that it is the fact that it is so obvious a fraud, by now, which almost guarantees that it will not be seen.

      Also, people will shy away from the fact that not only have they been pathetic, unobservant, dupes, now being pumped with poisons disguised as medicines, but that their own governments have turned against them as part of a conspiracy of immense – in fact global – scope.

      The scale is astonishing: even now, 5 million Ethiopian school kids are being inducted into a digital identity scheme. Ethiopia!!!

      A creeping techno-tyranny, with tentacles pushing into every crevice it can find, trialling one scheme here, another there.

      The question is: can these schemes really scale -up? And if so, for how long can it last?

      • NomadicBeer says:

        I think I know why Will Doors is such a great leader for this global agenda.

        Microsoft was never an inventive company. All of what they created was bought or stolen.

        Why were they so successful? Here is the recipe, and all it needs is tons of money:

        – Launch crappy product, copied (badly) or stolen but cheaper than the competitor
        – People laugh
        – Launch another version even crappier. Use propaganda and corruption to have schools and unis use it.
        – Repeat until most people accept MS products as the standard.

        Do you see the similarity to this agenda? All of their conspiracies are stupid and transparent but it does not matter. They have the support of the media and unlimited money to try it again and again on different poor populations until they find the one that becomes a mind virus and takes off.

  20. Fast Eddy says:

    Prof. Montagnier referred to the vaccine program for the coronavirus as an “unacceptable mistake”. Mass vaccinations are a “scientific error as well as a medical error,” he said. “It is an unacceptable mistake. The history books will show that, because it is the vaccination that is creating the variants,” Prof. Luc Montagnier continued.

    Mistake? Hahahahaha…. ‘they’ don’t make mistakes like this … this is a PLAN.

    The obstacle Luc is running into is that he surely is unaware of the shale oil situation —

    He said operators had carried out “massive fracks” that created “artificial, permanent porosity”, inadvertently reducing the pressure in reservoirs and therefore the available oil.
    The comments will cause alarm in the shale patch, given the crucial role of investors such as QEP in financing the onshore American oil business.

    Or that conventional peaked many years ago…

    He probably believes that we are about to transition to a Utopia of solar panels… EVs and gentle windmills…

    So he is unable to think of a reason why ‘they’ would do this on purpose…. it MUST be some sort of terrible mistake!

    He’ll scream and holler and beg and plead ‘them’ to stop …. and they will ignore him… and he’ll wonder what the hell is going on … why won’t they listen? Will he have a Mike Yeadon moment and realize that for some reason they want to kill us? I suppose at some point he will… will it matter? Nope.

    It does not matter if every virologist on the planet were to take to Bitchute … and scream STOP!!! And accept losing their careers because that’s soon going to be the least of their worries…

    Nobody will listen.

    And it does not matter… it is too late. The train has left the station … the bridge is out ahead… and it’s steaming full throttle ahead.

    How fantastic is this? When does Devil Covid strike??? Where will it strike first?

    What did Bosshy say – every 8-10 hours it gives birth… The Math Team is doing the Math…. over 1 billion have the jab now … billions upon billions of virus are humping and thumping… ramming and jamming…. it’s a Global Orgy …. Trudeau is up there in his Throne… waiting…and crying…. Ardern has her pout on as she shifts nervously while Clark has another go at the nanny in the spare room…

    Biden is barely alive and shouting at Hunter… more gold more gold MORE GOLD…. oblivious to the fact that he’ll never spend an ounce of it…

    Hopefully the animals in the cosmetics labs are released from their cages beforehand!!!!

    https://youtu.be/VKcAYMb5uk4

    • StarvingLion says:

      How come Montagnier, Yeadon, Tenpenny, Bosshy, Fleming, are not being murdered by the elders?

      I mean NOT A SINGLE ONE of the Apollo moon landing astronots came out and spilled the beans on something thats far less important than this experimental “vaccine” shit.

      C’mon Eddy, I bet you have no response to offer.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        Why kill them when you can just keep them off the BBC, CNN, etc… and they for all intents and purposes… do not exist…

        As Yeadon says he worked with one of the main guys in the UK Ministry of Health … and that person is very much aware of him… but he is unconcerned… 99.99999% of the world are unaware of Yeadon, Bosshy, and Luc….

        There are tens of thousands of scientists and medical professionals who have signed Great Barrington… they too do not exist.

        It is very simple to run an operation like the CEP when you control the MSM. You almost never hve to kill anyone…

        • StarvingLion says:

          It won’t be so easy when the easy money spigot is turned off. Then it will be “nothing left to lose”.

          And crypto and sideways movement in major stock indices is kind of hinting that deleting youtube content and BBC and CNN brainwashing aint gonna cut it.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          The fact that a huge share of the population watches the television many hours a week allows brain washing even more than if there were truly independent media providing different sides of the story.

        • Xabier says:

          Even when Elon Musk tweeted about the crap tests which he took, no one woke up to the fraud and it din’t get traction in the MSM.

          There is hardly anyone more prominent than Elon, and he put the truth right in front of his followers, that those tests are meaningless.

          No wonder they despise us.

      • Xabier says:

        Why murder Yeadon? He’s on the margins, listened to by practically no one, excluded from the MSM, and so are the others.

        It doesn’t matter if people wake up, even 20-30% of the population, when most are asleep and in many cases wish to remain like that.

        It’s been a very effective brain-washing campaign, and their estimate of the general intelligence of the population has been spot on – to our shame.

      • Tim Groves says:

        Murdering Montagnier, Yeadon, Tenpenny, Bosshy, Fleming, et. al would be a monstrous own goal. Strike them down and there is a chance they may become more powerful than you could possibly imagine.

        Whistleblowers get silenced all the time, including by murder. But that’s usually because someone is desperate to silence them. Perhaps the controllers of the Covid scheme are anything but desperate. They are confident that the thing will proceed exactly as they have foreseen.

        Apollo was far less important, and therefore not worth an astronaut risking their life to blow the lid off. But the Covid scheme is the most important thing going on in society these days, at least superficially. It is impacting the lives of billions of people in all kinds of negative ways. So some specialists feeling the need to speak out shouldn’t be surprising, even if they haven’t figured out all the details.

        • Fast Eddy says:

          I suspect that the MSM could run with these guys day and night now … and it would not matter.

          With a billion + injections completed.. the die is surely cast

      • rufustiresias999
        rufustiresias999 says:

        Shouldn’t they silent Gail, put OFW offline? I mean, what is told here is extremely dangerous. And it’s accessible to everyone on the internet, it’s not even on the dark net!! Guys I hope you all use VPNs and other sophisticated tech to hide yourself. One day some men in black suits and black glasses Will knock on your door and no on on will ever hear of you 😁

        • Xabier says:

          True, but it might well be that no one will hear of them again……

          I already know that I am in the ‘inessential’ category anyway.

  21. Fast Eddy says:

    NormDunc – what’s going on here?

    Nobel Prize Winner French Virologist Luc Montagnier Explains How COVID-19 Vaccines Are Creating Variants
    https://greatgameindia.com/covid-19-vaccines-creating-variants/

    Mass infection prevention and mass vaccination with leaky Covid-19 vaccines in the midst of the pandemic can only breed highly infectious variants.
    https://www.geertvandenbossche.org/

    How the CDC is manipulating data to prop-up “vaccine effectiveness”
    New policies will artificially deflate “breakthrough infections” in the vaccinated, while the old rules continue to inflate case numbers in the unvaccinated.
    https://off-guardian.org/2021/05/18/how-the-cdc-is-manipulating-data-to-prop-up-vaccine-effectiveness/

    • StarvingLion says:

      Eddy, this 1 minute video is for you. Its from the elders leaking info in 1956 . Maybe its fake.

      https://tv.gab.com/channel/jttlp1/view/prophetic-60a50d14191191029f8e5b62

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        This video must have been created recently.

  22. Yoshua says:

    “CRYPTO LOSSES EXCEED $2T”

    Well…it was actually worse.

    • StarvingLion says:

      Lets all pile into “crypto” ponzi so that when Bitcoin loses another 98% we’ll look like financial geniuses?

      Rock solid at 33K (Wink wink).

      First came the Bitcoin billionaires. Now comes the sop stories. Example:

      “Put all my dough into Bitcoin at 64000 then watched it drop all the way down to 100 never wavering in my belief Bitcoin would go to 500000.”

      • doomphd – Honolulu – I really hold a doctor of philosophy (phd) in geological sciences and study pretty doomy topics like giant landslides, volcanic eruptions and megatsunamis.
        doomphd says:

        back in 1929, somebody famous (I forget who) was getting stock investment advice from the taxi driver. that’s when it hit him that it was time to get out of the market.

    • Fast Eddy says:

      For true believers… now is the time to buy MOAR!!!

    • “CRYPTO LOSSES EXCEED $2T” which means the run up was what? 3 or 4 or 5 trillion? ……………………………… ps: I own no crypto, but obviously buying BTC after it plunged from 19,000 to 3,000 was a good deal for those who bought into this ponzi back then.

  23. Yoshua says:

    Bitcoin and other cryptos continue to crash. Somewhere around $1T has been wiped out from cryptos this week.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E2FjnMyX0AAJaI2?format=jpg&name=large

    • StarvingLion says:

      Bitcoin will destroy the entire economy because an endless supply of suckers are buying the dip all the way down to 100 because of their divine belief in hyperinflation.

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        What will they buy with bitcoin? We are rapidly finding less and less to buy, like Ugo Bardi’s analogy of being stranded on a desert island.

        • StarvingLion says:

          A Flying Saucer obviously to police the hordes carrying ak-47’s or else why would “serious” phd physicists be so obsessed about aliens?

        • Xabier says:

          Or like King Midas, who was delighted to see everything he touched turned to gold, but found it was no use to him.

          There is a message in that tale for the technologists and bankers who want everything to be digitised and trackable and everyone a slave – it may not work out the way they hoped.

  24. Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
    Ed says:

    It has started. The Bearsville theater in Woodstock, New York, will not admit non-vaxxed person. As only 37% are vaxxed I am thinking of starting “Back to the Garden” a venue for people who have not been genetically engineered by Gates and Fauci.

  25. Yoshua says:

    Danny Sheehan got involved with UFO’s in the Carter administration. Carter demanded that the CIA would hand over all UFO information to him. The head of CIA was at that time George Bush. He refused and said that the president didn’t have the right security clearance and a need to know.

    Not even presidents are informed. This subject has a higher security clearance than the Manhattan Project.

  26. Yoshua says:

    Elizondo’s family moved to Cuba. They fled the Communist regime to America. Lue is a scientist, inventor and a secret agent. He was assigned to Pentagon to lead AATIP. He resigned and told everyone about Pentagon’s UFO secrets. He is now running for Congress. He has sworn an oath to the American people…not to some rough secret government.

  27. Yoshua says:

    Lue Elizondo was the head of Pentagon’s secret UFO program AATIP. Pentagon has been trying to silence Lue, so he he asked for legal advice from Danny “Who the f**k do you think you are talking to?” Sheehan.

    Sheehan turned the tables and made complaints to the Inspector General, who will now look into if Pentagon has been involved in illegal activities, like harassing Lue and illegally hiding UFO evidence from the public.

    Anyway…Lue told Sheehan that he had walked into a facility that stored an intact UFO. They have studied it for decades without making heads or tails of it, according to Dr. Eric W Davis.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Strange!

    • Xabier says:

      Elizondo? The tiny Basque town in the Pyrenees I was going to move to before all of this Covid nonsense blew up, where family lived 300 years ago – he’s no relation though.

      Probably descended from one of the tough rural workers who set off for the New World- maybe Mexico? or from one of the Basque shepherds who went to the US – to escape the dire poverty of a Spain in decline – and now a mover and shaker mixed up with aliens, well, well….

      It’s a funny old world, if you don’t get murdered, starved to death or genetically modified.

  28. It’s just the Weather…sarcasm…nothing to do with Collapse
    The Telegraph
    Trucks of fresh water used to feed Taiwan’s semiconductors as crops left to die in punishing drought
    Nicola Smith
    Sat, May 22, 2021, 9:09 AM

    The world’s largest microchip maker is buying tanker trucks full of water to keep its plant going as farmers struggle to make ends meet during the worst drought in the history of Taiwan.

    The Taiwanese government this week said it would tighten water rationing from June 1 in the semiconductor making hubs of Hsinchu and Taichung if there is no significant rainfall by then. This would require companies to cut water consumption by 17 per cent.

    Chip manufacturing requires a significant amount of water, and the shortfall in Taiwan, the rainswept island that hasn’t seen a typhoon in the last last year, has sounded alarm bells across the world.

    The global economy is suffering from a major shortage of semiconductors that are key to almost all consumer appliances and vehicles.

    A cut in supply from factories shut by Covid first hit the market last year, but a surge in spending on electrical items during lockdown has savaged the industry.

    The automotive sector is by far the hardest hit, with Ford, Volkswagen and Jaguar Land Rover shutting down factories and laying off workers.

    Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd (TSMC), the world’s largest chipmaker, told the Telegraph it had a contingency plan for the punishing drought compounding global supply issues further.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/trucks-fresh-water-used-feed-130941849.html?.tsrc=fp_deeplink

    Well, we can see where our priorities are set, don’t we…seems chips are first and not the potato 🍠

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Not enough fresh water for all uses any more!

    • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
      Ed says:

      And the funny part TSMC is building a new large chip factory in Arizona! Water?

      • Duncan Idaho says:

        No problem:
        Phoenix simply pumps it uphill for 250 miles.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Pumping fresh water is uphill is an option, just desalination and deeper wells are options. They all required energy consumption and other resource use, needless to say.

    • Tim Groves says:

      I know where Taiwan’s water has gone.

      It is falling now in Kyoto.

      Our monsoon usually begins around June 10 and goes on until around July 15. This year, it began around May 15 and is expected to continue until the second-half of July.

      Let’s hope the sky clears for the Olympics!

      And of course, this is very bad news for solar power output and for summer veggies.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        Olympics??? Waiting for the cancellation announcement… can’t have the fittest men and women on earth… put their lives at risk…

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Interesting! I would think some of this rain would hit Taiwan, as well.

  29. Here is a YouTube video in which a New Zealand doctor is saying how her life has been affected by censorship of medical professionals seeking to inform the public about Covid-19 and the “vaccines” where the information they are giving is in opposition to the official line. A brave woman in an unsettling world.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      The front page lead article in the Atlanta Journal Constitution today is about how the awful chiropractors are misleading the public about COVID-19 vaccines.

      • Xabier says:

        What, Gail, are they telling……the truth?

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Doctors and chiropractors have had a long history of being on the opposite side of questions.

          By the way, my father’s only brother was a chiropractor and my father was a doctor (general practitioner, early on, psychiatrist later). They managed to get along.

    • Xabier says:

      Dr Sam Bailey: a physician and woman of incomparable value.

      And clearly, like Dr Yeadon, it hasn’t been easy for her: but she is sticking to her guns, like the once famous Maid of Saragossa, who blasted away at the French in the Napoleonic wars.

      ‘I’ve chosen my path’ she says – now that is a real woman!

      How has New Zealand become Nazi – land? What has happened?! Why do people not see through that poisonous fake, Jacinda? Why are they so bloody spineless and supine?

      • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
        Ed says:

        I have high hopes the south island will stand up and declare its independence.

        • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
          Ed says:

          In scattered reports the Republic of Te Ika a Maui claims to have destroyed the electrical grid of the Renegade Jacinda’s occupation forces on Aotearoa.

          • Xabier says:

            Faced with the growing insurgency, Jacinda puts on her ‘sincere and pained’ face, but with a hint of severe punishment to come from Big Mother if things don’t quieten down….

            • Tim Groves says:

              He’s/she’s probably a tranny, IF this video is anything to go by. And if so, that should be enough to get him/her defrocked as prime minister. Not for being transsexual. But for falsely representing his/her gender while running for office.

      • StarvingLion says:

        New Zealand: Oil reserves, billion barrels, 1980 – 2021: For that indicator, we provide data for New Zealand from 1980 to 2021. The average value for New Zealand during that period was 0.12 billion barrels with a minimum of 0.04 billion barrels in 2020 and a maximum of 0.21 billion barrels in 1991. The latest value from 2021 is 0.04 billion barrels. For comparison, the world average in 2021 based on 187 countries is 8.87 billion barrels.

        • Sam says:

          I’m not sure what you’re trying to say is that how much she consumes or is that how much she has on hand? How much does she consume really confusing how you have it drawn out there. I see new New Zealand being consumed by China

      • Fast Eddy says:

        And she’s pretty. Oh so pretty.

        • Fast Eddy says:

          Jacinda looks a little more haggard than usual … perhaps the lying is stressing her out or just the knowledge that she is planning to kill the Great Fast Eddy… or might this be when she found out that Clark had knocked up the nanny?

          It’s impossible to find a photo of the nanny… I bet she’s hot!!!

          • Xabier says:

            Ha! Living with ‘bild blik bitter’ Jacinda would certainly tempt one to stray, probably with anything in reach down to the family dog. If you find hot nanny let us know!

            I once saw Tony Blair’s wife in the flesh, the memory still makes me shudder.

            Helen Christiansen was also fairly ghastly – saw her coming out of a Mayfair restaurant, more like a vampire than anything else, drugged up I suppose.

            A real gem though was Greta Scacchi, saw her in her prime at the same place. In fact even lovelier than she appeared in ‘White Mischief.’

  30. It is not terribly surprising that ‘social progress’ correlates with energy use per capita. That seems to imply that ‘progress’ is liable to reverse as energy use declines. Anyway, it is a nice graphic:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_energy_consumption_per_capita#/media/File:SpcialProgressIndexVsEnergInOilPerDay2.png

    “The Social Progress Index (SPI) measures the extent to which countries provide for the social and environmental needs of their citizens. Fifty-four indicators in the areas of basic human needs, foundations of well-being, and opportunity to progress show the relative performance of nations.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Progress_Index

    • Here we go, I found some text in TWTP. As I indicated before, Nietzsche proposes a holistic, ‘ontological’ view of the cosmos (he uses that term) in which all sorts of ‘beings’ – suns, ecosystems, organic forms, humans, their economies and societies – strive to acquire and concentrate, to increase, power. He understands psychology, and moral and political philosophy within that ontological context – and he may not have fully developed the theory before his mind gave way.

      (Thus human ‘intentionality’ is ‘epiphenomenal’ to cosmic forces that compel the formation of dissipative structures, and human ‘consciousness’ is not so much about comprehension as about the production of orienting narratives – as he points out elsewhere.

      (What we call ‘social progress’ is driven by universal forces that compel energy concentration and dissipation. Our use of energy is not simply driven by the organic impulses behind ‘progress’, rather those impulses are themselves ‘driven’ by the universal tendency to form structures that dissipate energy – we and our societies represent particular forms of it.

      (Thus, the strong thesis would be that ‘independence politics’ like Brexit and Scotland, and IEA schemes to ‘reduce green house gasses’ are epiphenomenal to cosmic forces that compel the formation, and reformation, of dissipative structures – here societies and economies. The proponents do not necessarily understand what is going on, nor are they necessarily accurate in their forecasts – rather they are constructing narratives that in some sense help the dissipative structures to get from A to B. – I am constructing the full, ‘holistic’ ontological picture there from the pieces that he offers.)

      This is an appendix to the former discussion, where he discusses the ‘epiphenomenality’ of consciousness and ‘intentionality’: https://ourfiniteworld.com/2021/05/04/how-the-worlds-energy-problem-has-been-hidden/comment-page-10/#comment-294982

      > 688 …. that all driving force is will to power, that there is no other physical, dynamic or psychic force except this.

      689 …. The will to accumulate force is special to the phenomena of life, to nourishment, procreation, inheritance – to society, state, custom, authority. Should we not be permitted to assume this will as a motive cause in chemistry, too? – and in the cosmic order?

      Not merely conservation of energy, but maximal economy in use, so the only reality is the will to grow stronger of every center of force – not self-preservation, but the will to appropriate, dominate, increase, grow stronger.

      …. Can we assume a striving for power divorced from a sensation of pleasure and displeasure, i.e., divorced from the feeling of enhanced or diminished power? Is mechanism only a sign language for the factual world of struggling and conquering internal quanta of will? All the presuppositions of mechanistic theory – matter, atom, gravity, pressure and stress – are not “facts-in-themselves” but interpretations with the aid of psychical fictions.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Right! All we need to do is move backward on the Social Progress Index, and we can reduce our energy consumption per capita. Perhaps if we are frightened to death, and stay home voluntarily, it will help reduce our energy consumption without as bad an effect on the Social Progress Index.

      • It is tempting to interpret c 19 lockdowns as socially produced ‘narratives’ that are ‘epiphenomenal’ to the current trajectories of the dissipative systems, to wind down and reform, along with the whole IEA ‘green transition’ project.

        They are certainly part of the same picture, the only question is how ‘conscious’ and accurately ‘informed’ the policies are – they are ‘driven’, either way. Societies are adapting, on that interpretation, with degrees of consciousness to a situation of much less energy flow. C 19 may be an example of an entirely ‘oblivious’ policy that is ordered to dissipative reformation – it is hard to say.

        It is possible that IEA is as aware as any finite worlder of the future ‘score’ on reduced energy flow, and they are holding the ‘news’ back – or they may not have faced up to it themselves. It is difficult to say without some interrogation on the matter, which seems to be out of the question.

        ‘Green’ and ‘public safety’ would seem to be examples of ideological ‘narratives’ that will take the place, in prominence, of older ideological ‘narratives’ like ‘liberty, the pursuit of happiness and human potential’. New energetic conditions – contraction and reformation, rather than ongoing expansion – will likely give rise to new orienting ‘narratives’.

        The ‘Social Progress Index’ may then be calculated with other ‘factors’ in mind than hitherto. From the ‘epiphenomenal dissipative’ perspective, ‘progress’ is not considered in terms of absolute ‘factors’, but rather as ‘factors’ that express the current tendencies of the dissipative structure. The ‘progress’ ‘factors’ will reflect what people consider to be ‘important’ in the given circumstances – and ultimately what facilitates dissipative reformation and function.

        It is different to Marx’ point that ideology reflects material (energetic, technological) conditions, in that the ‘grand narrative’, here, is not the gradual surmounting of human ‘alienation’ – rather, all that is ‘really happening’ is energy dissipation. The ‘grand narrative’ is shifting away, here, from early capitalist ‘liberal humanism’, to a perspective, a hermeneutic, that is historically located within a situation of radically changing, indeed transitional, energetic conditions.

        For now, we are likely to maintain the older ‘values’, like the current ‘Index’, in our strategies, but it is only a matter of time before they give way to something better adapted to the new conditions. We will just have to wait and see what the exact details are. Likely we will revert to an overt social stratification, the norm in all ages bar our own – some kind of ‘neo-feudal’ ideology (which perhaps began to emerge as far back as Romanticism).

        The whole subject of ‘social values’ will likely be approached very differently when there is much less to go around, and there is far less scope for universal ‘improvement’. So, lets enjoy the societies that we have now! This is probably as ‘good as it gets’ for most us – though of course, ‘evaluation’ is relative.

        • Xabier says:

          Translation:

          Techno-feudalism is being imposed, by deceit (and soon by force ) and this global coup d’etat by TPTB will be covered up with hypocritical BS about ‘going Green and saving the Earth’.

          • StarvingLion says:

            By force of what? 5000 impending civil wars? Are they going to drop some more bombs and make AK-47 hordes even stronger? Are they going to inject ever worsening experimental serums to completely destroy the fabric of “society”.

            The Bitcoin collapse was the last straw. TPTB aint gonna be popular with anyone without the easy money.

  31. Collapse of your own body over Ten years ain’t pretty

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BH0dI76WfCM

    Pretty cool special effects ….Out with the Old looks just awful…

  32. Fast Eddy says:

    Vaccines: truth, lies, and controversy

    Peter Gotzsche is no crank. Rather the opposite, in fact. In the world of evidence based medicine, he is one of the great heavyweights. He was a founding member of the Cochrane collaboration, is a professor of clinical research methodology at the university of Copenhagen, and has had his work repeatedly published in all the leading medical journals.

    His blunt honesty and willingness to speak truth to power, even in the face of personal consequences, makes him one of my personal heroes.

    One year ago, Gotzsche came out with a book called ”Vaccines: truth, lies, and controversy”. Considering how hot the topic of vaccines is, you would expect the book to have be selling at a furious rate ever since it came out. Instead, it languishes in obscurity. The problem, in my estimation, is that it is too brutally honest, and that it therefore pleases no-one

    No-one wants a balanced take. Most of the people who write and talk about vaccines are fundamentalists, of either the anti-vaccine or pro-vaccine variety. The anti-vaccine fundamentalists control the debate on social media (or at least they did until social media started actively censoring them), while the pro-vaccine fundamentalists control the debate in mainstream media.

    Both groups are only interested in reading and talking about books that feed their biases and further their one-sided agenda. But most people aren’t fundamentalists. They just want to know the truth. Which is why the book is so important.

    Gotzsche begins with the sacred cow of the anti-vaccine fundamentalists, the belief that the MMR (meases mumps rubella) vaccine can cause autism. He goes in detail through the sequence of events surrounding the profit-driven scientific fraud that led to this now widespread and yet utterly false belief, making particular note of how this fraud was enabled and supported by The Lancet, which is in spite of this is still considered one of the most prestigious medical journals in the world.

    Apparently there is nothing a major medical journal can do that will result in a loss of its reputation. He then goes through the epidemiological evidence, much of which has been conducted in Gotszches home country of Denmark, showing that there is no link whatsoever between MMR vaccination and autism.

    Immediately after destroying this central tenet of anti-vaccine fundamentalism, Gotzsche switches focus, and, after a brief interlude to discuss how morally reprehensible attempts at coercing people in to getting vaccinated are (politicians should take note!), he tears in to one of the sacred cows of the pro-vaccine fundamentalists, the belief that the influenza vaccine is beneficial and important.

    Over the course of a few chapters, he clarifies the evidence that exists on the influenza vaccine, going through the randomized trials and systematic reviews, and showing that there is no good evidence that the influenza vaccine has any effect on the things that matter, namely hospitalizations and deaths, nor for that matter any evidence that it does anything at all for the elderly.

    Of course, this isn’t what the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) claims. With multiple examples, Gotzsche shows how the CDC website is rife with misinformation that would make even a pharmaceutical company blush. He lays out the close ties that exist between the CDC and the pharmaceutical industry.

    Then he shows how the CDC consistently ignores the higher quality evidence (randomized controlled trials) showing that the influenza vaccine is largely useless, and may even do more harm than good, while instead focusing on low quality evidence (observational studies, and in particular case-control studies which are notoriously unreliable) that do show benefit.

    I have personally noticed the CDC doing exactly the same thing with the scientific evidence of face masks. It is clear that the CDC (just like many other public health agencies) will produce the results it’s political and financial masters want, whatever those results may be, and regardless of whether they align with the science.

    After discussing the influenza vaccine, Gotzsche moves on to the HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccine. This is a vaccine that is primarily given to pre-pubescent girls, with the goal of protecting them from developing cervix cancer (which is usually causes by certain strains of HPV). He goes in detail in to how the pharmaceutical companies have manipulated their trials and the subsequent post-approval surveillance in such a way as to hide evidence of harms.

    https://sebastianrushworth.com/2021/05/22/vaccines-truth-lies-and-controversy/

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Looking online, the book seems to have been published in February 2020 in a Kindle Edition. There seems to be an updated version which talks about COVID-19 vaccines, perhaps not yet available in English.

    • Xabier says:

      My God, can it really be…..real science, and not The Science (TM) with which we are being bullied?

      • Foolish Fitz
        FoolishFitz says:

        There is still real science Xabier, it’s just being buried in a concerted effort to promote the new religion.

        An old Giorgio Agamben piece sums it up quite well.

        “As has happened many times in the course of history, philosophers must again enter into conflict with religion, which is no longer Christianity, but science or that part of it that has assumed the form of a religion. I do not know if bonfires will return and books will be put on the Index, but clearly the thought of those who continue to seek the truth and reject the dominant lie will be, as is already happening before our eyes, excluded and accused of spreading fake news (news, not ideas, because news is more important than reality!).”

        The sound of truth may appear drowned in the cacophony of lies and that’s certainly what the disciples of the new religion known as “the science” would like us to believe, but there are always many ready to bear witness.

        ” As in all moments of emergency, real or simulated, we see once again the ignorant slander philosophers and scoundrels seeking to profit from the disasters that they themselves have provoked. All this has already happened and will continue to happen, but those who testify to the truth will not stop doing so, because no one can bear witness for the witness”.

        https://itself.blog/2020/05/02/giorgio-agamben-medicine-as-religion/

        Here’s one such fine fellow and his final line will bring a bit of Sunday cheer😉

        https://twitter.com/i/status/1395364378690609154

        • Hubbs says:

          A good post FE. The problem goes deeper in that there is no rule of law. A digression here. I was going to delete this post but I say screw it.

          A “without rule of law’ (WROL) situation is a parallel to the corrupt scientific “information” that comes out through the enabling corrupt media and political processes. Remember, most politicians are lawyers, so already you have a bad seed. In a quasi Democracy, a fiat currency system allows, at least temporarily, the creation of “money” (especially via the Cantillon effect) that allows politicians to “pay” for the programs that get them re-elected. From there, they become magnets for influence money, especially from the corporations. Politicians get rich, and corporations get special laws and loopholes in return. A duopoly of control emerges. This is fascism.

          Note how traditionally, the court house was the center of the town, a “holy shrine” that even surpassed the church or the school in its majesty and reverence. The judges still parade around in black robes and the bailiff still announces “All Rise” when the judge enters the court. A charade to makes the masses believe that solemn justice still exists. There is no justice, except street justice. There are no legal, political or constitutional remedies for what is hollowing out our western societies. We are burning the candle from both ends -a financial one from a debt /fiat build up and other from insidious energy/fresh water/raw materials depletion.

          The verdicts and decisions are pre determined by carefully “appointed” judges or juristictions and the evidence is distorted, suppressed, exaggerated or falsified. The most flagrant example is the numerous State Supreme Courts in the US who basically refused to let the evidence, no matter how material, no matter how incontrovertible, ever see the light of day. Or the Trump impeachments and the corrupt evidence of the dossier and testimony from a chow thief.

          I have been a victim to this in small town divorce courts where both opposing lawyers know the Commissioner and the Judge are incompetent bumbling fools and play them as buffoons to throw a clear cut case into a quagmire from which the lawyers benefit as their meters run.

          In rogue agencies like the State Medical Board’s which are created by the State Legislatures, a doctor is served up as a scapegoat without due process, and like divorce cases, even when the statutes are cited by the Judges or administrative law judges in their written opinions, they are turned completely on their heads. Controlling overwhelming exculpatory evidence is ignored, stipulated pre approved panel experts are suddenly ignored if their testimony undermines the medical board’s need to serve up a scapegoat to salvage their public image.

          I’d mention my memoirs, but the fact is, no one cares. Your key point is the ability to call a spade a spade, and I can tell you the doctors are no more trustworthy than the lawyers. The doctors have been largely protected by their traditional image as altruistic and honorable professionals, but this has changed. I have zero medical colleagues friends for good reason. I call them as I see them, but in the opening paragraph of my memoirs, I wrote “Few people on this earth despise lawyers as much as I do.”

          • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
            Gail Tverberg says:

            It seems as if, once a person gets acquainted with any of these specialties, a person figures out what goes wrong. “Science” today depends on grants to fund studies. To get a grant, a scientist needs to prove something that someone who is willing to fund the study would like to hear. This is easy to do, if a person uses a “scientific model” to model part of the problem. Without all of the feedback loops, it is possible to prove almost anything: up equals down; 1/0 = 5. Science easily gets sidetracked to “going where the money is.”

            Legal cases and medicine aren’t all that different from science, I am afraid. We end up with multiple faith systems that we all have to work around.

            • Fast Eddy says:

              When do the scientists who know what is going on (both Yeadon and Montagnier claim many do but are unwilling to destroy their careers to speak out) come out of the closet?

              We can see how powerful a motivator money is… they are faced with a massacre … yet they remain silent.

              Humans are so easily controlled. It’s like training a dog — just give them treats.

          • Fast Eddy says:

            Did I mention I stuffed a barrister for $6000 with a logic bomb?

            That’s a rather pleasant outcome as the hangman slips the noose around our necks.

            I am also feeling quite pleased about those 10 years of bucket listing… time to start dropping ‘I told you so’ hints to the doubters …

            I’ve suggested to a couple of expat mates that they consider returning home… still time to have a pre-wake for their own funeral… but they ignore me… they still believe we will come out the other end of this…. soon…

            Hope is a precious thing. Losing it can be devastating.

        • Artleads says:

          Sunday cheer indeed!

  33. houtskool says:

    Good thing is, we won’t bump our heads against the low hanging fruit anymore.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      LOL!

  34. “The COVID Nightmare is Political,” by Martin Armstrong

    “It appears we are reentering the age of segregation. Instead of race-oriented, now it will be vaccinated or not. The government and the press have not been able to scare the majority into these experimental vaccines. Despite the press being the government and Bill Gates’ co-conspirators, only 37.5% of the total U.S. population have been vaccinated. Despite the press creating the fake impression that the majority is vaccinated and believes government and Bill Gates, they have not yet convinced the American public.

    “Now we have Schwab desperately trying to convince employers to fire people who are not vaccinated. Something just does not smell right. Schwab and Gates are the two most distrustful people on the planet. WHY are they pushing so hard for vaccinations for a disease that is no more lethal than the flu?

    “There are many viruses more dangerous than COVID. The huge open question: Why has this become so political?”

    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/international-news/disease/the-covid-nightmare-is-political/

    • Student says:

      I think it is not particularly important what kind of virus choose to start their project, this is the best virus option (created or unintentionally arrived) to start with a well-planned project made of a long series of restrictions which will create the new normal life for (at least) the western world.
      With this plan there is the wonderful opportunity: to reduce travels, put people under a long series of gates to have permission to do or not do something and also start with digital identity and some kind of remote control (green pass is only a first step) and many other things.
      In the new indisputable scenario made of less resources, this is a fantastic opportunity to avoid social instability – at least – in the so-called advanced world and have people do what you want.

      • Artleads says:

        We SHOULD stop travelling. I made up my mind to do so some 5 years ago. What part of crazy security world gone mad don’t we understand? If you have the means to stay home most of the time, then stay home. We have the internet (for now) to see the world through and to associate with others. Such behavior we should have seen the need for a long time ago, perhaps centuries. JUST DON’T GET VACCINATED. That’s the ONLY rule!!!!!

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      We may very well be entering a new age of segregation, based on willingness to follow directions such as vaccines and masks.

      • Student says:

        Just to make an example: I don’t know if in US you’ve ever heard about the violent protests started in France in 2018. Actually, French government tried to put a tax on fuels with the main objective to reduce the use of fossil fuels for commuting. As a result violent protests came out from normal people (yes, normal people), who were then quickly nominated gilets jaunes (yellow gillets), from the name of the gillets people must wear when they have to stop on the side of the road in case of unexpected vehicle problems.
        From what I remember, various political forces tried to convey these protests towards some political party, but those people had such different social, cultural and regional backgrounds that it was not possible. They were just people who needed to go and come back from work without erasing their salaries too much. With that, let’s say, clear and simple social event, people in charge of power could have had an illuminating answer to their question: what happen if you try to explain people that there are no more resources and in particular fossil fuels?
        Well, simply society disintegrates and maybe – even worst – localizes itself (instead of staying global) and you lose control of everything..

        please see here for reference: https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/france-tax-fuel-increase-rise-suspended-gilets-jaunes-protests-paris-edouard-philippe-a8666331.html

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Right. The tax was added because the fuel wasn’t really available. People protested because it made commuting to work too expensive.

          Now people are being told that they will have to drive electric cars. It is really doubtful that the electricity will be there for them, but the story at least gives hope for a time.

        • rufustiresias999
          rufustiresias999 says:

          What you say is right. It might be a bit more complex. Diesel fuel in France is subsidized (less taxed) so many people who drive many kilometers, especially commuters living far from cities, i.e. Often less paid workers, who have to live farer from job places chose to buy diesel fueled cars (despite they are more expensive than gasoline – essence – cars).
          When it was found that diesel fuel is more dangerous for health (toxic particles) government wanted to gradually reduce subsidies to diesel fuel. That ignated the yellow jackets movement.
          I wonder if there is also a link to the fact that diesel fuel is becoming rarer and more expensive to refine : you need “good quality” oil for that, shale oil can’t apply, I think . So avoiding use of diesel fuel for private cars and keep it for delivery trucks, agriculture and build machines seems wise. But how can you explain that to low wages families? It’s is also telling that oil is getting scarce. You don’t want to scare people.

          • Xabier says:

            I’d agree: governments do not care one bit about public health, so the extra tax was about declining availability of diesel and the Great Re-set intention of getting ordinary people off the roads and locked up at home as much as possible.

            • Student says:

              Surely in our society too much time has been spoiled in other directions instead of trying to explain people ‘finite world’ and energy availability concepts.
              If I can give my idea, I think that a general mistake happened especially during the shale oil era.
              For instance, before 2008 financial collapse and right after, there were some unexpected mainstream tv series which were trying to explain these energy issues.
              In Europe, during those years, one for all was the famous UK tv series “it is not easy going green”.

              In case, please see an example here:

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGRTvNKZH7o&list=PLQKP748B3fS79z1b1XTmyacUDtgL7l9pX

              That tv series talked about a family who was trying to change its life according to fossil fuels future scarcity.
              Besides that, other tv series were on the same line, but, after some years, suddenly everything stopped.
              Probably shale oil success was so overwhelming (and probably high level pressure to close these programmes too) that the world plunged again in BAU modality.
              After more than a decade, now the explanation of our problems has been completely addressed only towards climate change and pandemic.
              But I think that the problem with climate change is that it is something too distant from normal life of people and, in addition, it has been imposed so much from high level that I see very difficult it will have real persuasion success to change people habits.
              Pandemic is, in contrast, such a difficult subject that can even create on people anger and mistrust of institutions.
              In our current situation people is so distant to understand which are our real problems that I wonder how we can come again near to understand these subjects.
              Unfortunately it seems that high level decisions have started, in contrast, a different path.

          • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
            Gail Tverberg says:

            BP gives information on the use of various products by various parts of the world.

            My interpretation of what is going on is that on a world basis, the percentage of “middle distillates” has remained about level at 36.6% of the total oil products sold, worldwide, between 2010 and 2019. The percentage used for jet fuel increased from 7.3% to 8.1% between 2010 and 2019, leaving somewhat less (28.4%) for diesel fuel in 2019.

            Europe has steadily been increasing its percentage use of diesel fuel, from 41.4% of total oil consumption in 2010 to 44.6% of total oil consumption in 2019. Furthermore, its jet fuel consumption increased from 8.1% of the total in 2010 to 10.5% of total oil usage in 2019. Thus, Europe’s total Middle Distillates were 49.5% of total product supplied in 2010 and 55.2% in 2019. This does not work, when worldwide, the Middle Distillate share amounts to only 36.6% of oil products.

            Refining a typical barrel of oil doesn’t allow 55.2% for middle distillates. I do not know who was crazy enough not to balance Europe’s oil use with the correct distribution of the way a barrel of oil splits, but Europe created a lot of problems for itself when it encouraged the use of diesel for private passenger automobiles.

      • Artleads says:

        We could segregate one part of our individual selves from the other. I’m saying, wear a mask in public. Play the game, let’s all look like lemmings, just so we control the narrative, ridiculous or not. On the Other Hand: DON’T GET VACCINATED.

    • MM says:

      I do not know what the “we” you are talking about is.
      I simply do not see any more we, even if you rry hard.
      From the “i” s something will emerge.
      In that I trust!

  35. “Turkey is banning the import of most plastic waste after an investigation revealed British recycling was left to burn or be dumped on beaches and roadsides.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/may/19/turkey-to-ban-plastic-waste-imports

    • “Used to curb the spread of Covid-19, masks are exacerbating another pandemic: plastic pollution.”

      https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20210519-pandemic-mask-mountain-sets-new-recycling-challenge

      • “…the economics of the recycling business are broken in key ways…

        “Low oil prices, bans on imported recyclables in countries like China, and the latest trends in packaging design make it harder to recycle.”

        https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/22/is-recycling-a-waste-heres-the-answer-from-a-plastics-expert.html

        • “Microplastics Found in Europe’s Largest Ice Cap – In a Remote and Pristine Area of Vatnajökull Glacier [Iceland]…

          “The findings confirm that microplastic particles are distributed through the atmosphere.”

          https://scitechdaily.com/microplastics-found-in-europes-largest-ice-cap-in-a-remote-and-pristine-area-of-vatnajokull-glacier/

          • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
            Gail Tverberg says:

            Doesn’t sound good at all!

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Recycling of plastics hasn’t made sense for a few years, I am afraid. That is why China stopped accepting mixed “recyclables.”

          • Duncan Idaho says:

            One does not “recycle” plastic.
            One down cycles it.
            (I actually worked on this for a while)

          • Jarle says:

            “Recycling of plastics hasn’t made sense for a few years, I am afraid.”

            Did it ever?

            • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
              Gail Tverberg says:

              When the price of oil was very high and do-good organizations could be induced to pay the cost of overseas shipping of the recyclables, recycling plastics could sort of work. It also helped that sending the plastics back for China and other countries for recycling helped fill otherwise-empty containers for the return trip. Once the price of oil dropped in late 2014, recycling plastics ceased to make any sense at all. It took until January 2018 for China to shut down the industry.

  36. Dennis L. says:

    Tim Morgan has a new post, interesting that much of what is in this one is consistent with some of the issues discussed here. Perhaps the PTB understand things better than is commonly thought and are doing their best with a very large system to act for the common good. Yes, always the optimist.

    https://surplusenergyeconomics.wordpress.com/2021/05/22/200-other-roads-part-one/#comments

    Dennis L.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      I agree that this is a very good post of Tim Morgan’s. This is unusual for me, because I often don’t agree with him.

      Tim is talking about the impossibility of substituting renewables for fossil fuels. One of the things he says is that his “energy cost of energy” would have to go back down from 9% to 5%. This is pretty much equivalent to an average EROEI would have to move from 11 to 20.

      Back when the early Limits to Growth model was put together, it (indirectly, looking at the input code) came to the conclusion that not more than 5% of the output of the economy could be used as investment in new production. Once the ratio went about this level, the economy would tend to collapse. This would fit very well with Tim Morgan’s thoughts.

      You say, “Perhaps the PTB understand things better than is commonly thought.” I am not sure where you get this from. I don’t consider Tim Morgan to be part of the Powers that Be. He is also not part of the Biophysical Economics group that came up with the EROEI idea. That is why he was forced to come up with an alternative that did not refer to EROEI. I see him as sort of a loner, searching for the truth. He comes from a traditional economics background, however.

      What the IEA is doing in its “Net Zero by 2050” plan seems just plain crazy to me.

      • MM says:

        We will grow through R&D out of every and each problem.
        Even if our planet will become a plain desert.
        Love your TV series tonite!

      • Sam says:

        It’s strange how when people tell me we won’t need gas anymore because we will be using electric cars in the future….I say where is all the copper going to come from….your talking about a massive amount of copper A) to install copper in a car it takes about a mile of copper
        B) to install all the chargers will take millions of miles of at least 6 gauge copper…..
        Not to mention the cobalt and other precious metals… I am always shocked at how people with high levels of education can’t think this through..! But then again I am just a dumb tradesman….what do I know!?
        Most people can’t accomplish simple task such as build a small shed, saw horse, wire a three way switch etc….it is crazy…..

      • Xabier says:

        Tim Morgan is inching, slowly, towards the truth; but I doubt that he will ever transcend his naivety regarding human nature, politics and big business.

        He’s too decent and reasonable, and hasn’t learned the lessons of history.

        A bit like Dr Yeadon, who, however, has come on leaps and bounds in grasping the nature of our enemies and their plans.

    • Fast Eddy says:

      It’s obvious that the Elders are aware of what Tim is stating … and much more.

      As evidenced by the fact that they moved forward with Drill Baby Drill knowing it was a money loser from day one…. but it compensated for peaked and declining conventional oil….

      The Elders PR Team (now working on Covid) earlier convinced the cattle – and investors – that shale was a new Saudi Arabia… obviously they knew that was BS.

      And they knew from day 1 that shale was a dead end … as well as when the wells would run into mass depletion issues.

      They know that all oil sources have peaked… and they had a plan.. which involved putting the global economy on ice… to prevent $300 oil and an implosion….

      And they are aware of the implications of Peak Oil … the know about Bosnia and Holodomor and Nanking… and spent fuel ponds

      These are hard…smart… calculating men…. they have done everything they could to keep BAU alive… but when the math and the physics show there is no way out …. and that collapse means 8B suffer horribly and die…

      They would have made an easy call… and it is a very easy call. The right thing to do is obviously to kill everyone…. to prevent 8B people ripping each others faces off.

      They have known for a very long time that extinction was guaranteed. We can go easy … or we can do raping and murdering and eating each other.

      Anyone with half a brain would vote for the CEP…. as evidenced by the fact that Trudeau and Ardern are completely on board

      • Xabier says:

        What is perhaps more likely is that the scientifically illiterate, and poorly educated, key politicians are all up for secret sterilisation, rather than mass murder; but that the real movers and shakers (the MIC) – who grasp the energy crunch in all its implications and are the true psychopaths – have a plan for significant depopulation including mass murder as well.

        Psychologically, this is perhaps much more plausible.

        The politicians are like the people who drove the trains to Auschwitz: essential, but they probably didn’t know everything that went on.

        • NomadicBeer says:

          Thanks Xabier for your down to earth realism!

          I don’t pretend to know what’s going on but I can see the oligarchs more than happy to sterilize and kill big parts of population.
          A cursory look at the history finds plenty of example of leaders happily killing their own people. One particular gruesome example is Constantin (the great hero of Christianity) murdering a whole town out of pique. Of course he felt bad after (ha!).

          On the other hand no psychopath will kill himself unless he knows he has lost (see Hitler in the bunker). And even then he will kill as many of his own people as he can first.

          We are surrounded by zombies and the vampires are in control.
          So what can we do? How can we keep our humanity and defeat the evil? I don’t have high hopes.

  37. Here is an interesting YouTube video by Dr Jessica Rose examining and analysing the VAERS data relating to the Covid-19 injections. She expresses her alarm at the rapidly growing cases of adverse reactions associated with the injections, especially where immunological adverse reactions are concerned, and shows that the reported adverse reactions are statistically far more likely to be caused by the injections rather than being simply coincidental.

    • MM says:

      Males no sense to me!
      We are dead!
      We shot ourselves in the head when we accepted to wear masks denying that we did not evolve with masks.
      I must say probably we are more clever than 4 Billion years of “Evolution”.

      I mean robispierre et al published “meme” bullshit a long time ago and we still suffer from it.

      What we have done is a milennial epochal change. And it has been going on at light speed for one and a half year.
      You can not undo this.
      You can pretend “we did it right!”
      Well yes, that will only increase the amount of centuries to clean up the mess.

      I hate you!
      You are a murderer!

      Yes I am a muirderer and proud of it!

      • Bei Dawei says:

        And how do you feel about shoes?

        • Artleads says:

          This is how I feel about junked cars:

          https://sometimes-interesting.com/worlds-largest-old-car-junkyard-old-car-city-u-s-a/?fbclid=IwAR0EuydFAqifLknyZOira_40geiiPoi2VKTE6ogulHyGDL_oJGRVYjA55so

          Circles of the headlight. A Cadillac, from a time when its reputation was high.Those were the good days, or there was something about the car’s relation to its era that was prized. The solidity of the grill, the park lights in their perfect circles, the bumper that you couldn’t buy today. The sense that baking soda and many other available substances, noxious or otherwise, could bring the chrome to a gleaming shine. The possibilities and wonders of cleaning the paint. (And of course the practical thing to do is to apply a sanding machine to it, but then there’s the wonder if there wasn’t some other intermediate cleaning method that would “bring up” the colors of time and rust rather than sanding them away). Then of course, the delight of grasping the door handle, distracted as you look through the hazy glass. And the mellow smell once you get inside this era car and experience the comfortable seats is incomparably delightful. Getting the motor rebuilt–so you have one more useable vehicle in your village, one more device for electrical generation, providing you can afford an inverter for your house–might appeal to your utilitarian instincts. But the car would be quite useful and valuable to draw, paint or photograph…or just sit in. Such a car as this could have many uses without being a means to bolster growth and BAU.

        • MM says:

          My shoes make me walk “miles before I go to sleep”
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telefon_(film)

        • MM says:

          What do you mean with the word “feel”?
          What are “shoes”?
          While we use words (here online) we are enaging in a “Glasperlenspiel”
          I mean, it still is fun to post at OFW but not my reality any more. Sorry.

          • Bei Dawei says:

            What I mean is, we didn’t evolve to wear shoes, any more than we evolved to wear masks.

          • it’s all a game, a spiel, it’s fun except when it isn’t fun. OFW is as real as any other reality that you’ve ever seen and known. Close to the edge, down by the river, Down at the end, round by the corner, Seasons will pass you by, Now that it’s all over and done, Called to the seed, right to the sun, Now that you find, now that you’re whooooooollllllleeeeeee, Seasons will pass you by, I get up, I get down, I get up, I get down, I get up, I get down.

            • Tim Groves says:

              Yes, David, absolutely Yes.

              Sad preacher nailed upon the colored door of time
              Insane teacher be there, reminded of the rhyme
              There’ll be no mutant enemy we shall certify
              Political ends, as sad remains, will die
              Reach out as forward tastes begin to enter you
              Ooh, ooh

              I listened hard but could not see
              Life tempo change out and inside me
              The preacher trained in all to lose his name
              The teacher travels, asking to be shown the same
              In the end, we’ll agree, we’ll accept, we’ll immortalize
              That the truth of the man maturing in his eyes
              All complete in the sight of seeds of life with you

            • no better lyric ever than “I listened hard but could not see”.

  38. My my, SF are leading polls both north and south of the border in Ireland, and they could form governments in both.

    DUP has crashed to its lowest ever support (16%). Unionist support overall has fallen to 41%, splintered between 3 parties, and other voters are moving to the non-sectarian Alliance.

    There seems to be little chance that Unionists will secure a majority of seats in Stormont to question aspects of the NI Protocol. They took NI from Brexit to a hard Brexit to an Irish sea border, and now they have splintered to flog a dead horse. It is almost as if they are compelled to pursue the most self-destructive courses. And the election of Poots – what can one say?

    SF is averaging around 30% in the south, as the now established opposition. It has another 4 years to soak up the opposition there.

    > Sinn Fein most popular party in both Northern Ireland and Republic, polls show

    Sinn Fein would be the largest party in both Northern Ireland and the Irish republic if fresh elections were held today, polls show.

    The nationalist party has opened up a significant lead over its nearest unionist rivals north of the border, after a sharp collapse in support for the hard-right DUP. And in the south it has enjoyed a narrow but consistent lead in polling for the next Dáil elections since the start of the year, just ahead of Leo Varadkar’s Fine Gael, according to a poll of polls.

    The party could capitalise on its buoyant support in elections to Stormont scheduled for next year, but would have to wait until early 2025 for the next scheduled general election in the Republic of Ireland.

    A new survey for the Belfast Telegraph conducted by pollster LucidTalk shows Sinn Fein with a 9 per cent lead over the DUP.

    The unionist party’s support has halved since the general election 17 months ago with a historic low of 16 per cent. Its slide comes amid a backdrop of loyalist discontent over Brexit, and the replacement of its leader Arlene Foster with Edwin Poots. The survey found that the DUP’s support has fragmented between the even more hardline Traditional Unionist Voice (TUV), the more moderate Ulster Unionist Party, and the non-sectarian Alliance party. The Alliance is itself on 16 per cent in joint second place, trailing Sinn Fein on 25 per cent.

    In the Republic, a polling average calculated by the website Politico Europe has Sinn Fein averaging 29 per cent of the vote, ahead of Fine Gael on 26 per cent and Fianna Fáil on 15 per cent.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/sinn-fein-polls-northern-ireland-republic-largest-party-b1852109.html

    • DUP managed to elect a leader, Poots, with only 21% support among DUP voters. Their self-destructive tendencies are just breath-taking. They have lost half of their support in a year, in the run up to 2022 elections in which SF is likely to take the post of first minister for the first time.

      > DUP support at new low of 16% with Sinn Fein nine points ahead, poll finds

      …. The polls will make troubling reading for recently elected DUP leader Edwin Poots.

      In addition to falling well behind its Sinn Fein rivals, Poots’ personal rating among DUP voters is low.

      The survey found that his leadership rival, Sir Jeffrey Donaldson, was more popular among their supporters by a three-to-one margin.

      Two thirds backed Donaldson to replace the outgoing Arlene Foster, while only a fifth backed the man who ended up taking the job.

      When asked which candidate they would back if they had a vote in the DUP leadership contest, 64% of the party’s voters said Donaldson, while just 21% opted for Poots.

      A Belfast Telegraph poll four months ago put the DUP at an all-time-low of 19%. Another drop of 3% represents a new nadir for the party….

      https://www.thenational.scot/news/19322090.dup-support-new-low-16-sinn-fein-nine-points-ahead-poll-finds/

    • Tim Groves says:

      This Ireland of ours has for long been half free
      Six counties are under John Bull’s tyranny
      And most of our leaders are greatly to blame
      For shirking their part in the patriot game

    • A new book has been published on the 100 year history of NI.

      > What A Bloody Awful Country: Ex-Labour adviser Kevin Meagher’s book on 100 years of Northern Ireland

      …. They would do well to educate themselves with a copy of the Bolton-born, Sheffield-based writer’s new book, What A Bloody Awful Country: Northern Ireland’s Century of Division, in which the former special advisor to Labour Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Shaun Woodward provides a highly readable and hugely depressing overview of the north from the time of partition to the present day.

      …. “It is hard to argue that Northern Ireland has been anything other than a bad idea to begin with that got steadily worse,” writes Meagher, a lifelong Labour man who previously shared his views on the north’s future prospects in the 2016 book A United Ireland: Why Unification is Inevitable & How It Will Come About.

      “[It] resulted in a century that can be separated into distinct periods of 50, 30 and 20 years,” he continues, before outlining how this ’50-30-20′ split breaks down into 50 years of Unionist misrule [“there’s no other way of describing it – for me, that’s just an entirely neutral term,” comments Meagher], followed by 30 years of violent carnage during which it was forbidden for MPs to discuss the north in the House of Commons and 20 years of stop-start political progress, most of which might as well have taken place on Mars as far as the majority of those living on the other side of the Irish Sea are concerned.

      “[To the British public] Northern Ireland is a far-away place of which we know and often care very little,” explains the author, whose grandparents hailed from Kilkenny and Galway.

      …. Even for readers here in Ireland, What A Bloody Awful Country – its title taken from the infamous quote by former Home Secretary Reginald Maudling in the wake of his first visit to the north in 1970 (Maudling was sent back two years later to close down the Northern Ireland Parliament following the imposition of direct rule) – makes for a sobering read as Meagher diligently catalogues the kind of horrors which used to be casually referred to as ‘normal for Northern Ireland’.

      “I’m trying to say ‘this is what we’ve done in our name, this is part of the United Kindgom, part of the British state, a place that we don’t understand desperately well but which has cost enormous amounts in terms of lives and public finance – and which has an undiminished capacity, even right now, to cause enormous problems for the British state.

      “The Northern Ireland Protocol might be comparatively more benign, but nevertheless it’s put Northern Ireland right at the centre [in Westminster] again. In their view, it’s the proverbial pebble in the shoe – it just seem to make us hobble.”

      He adds: “When I talk about some of these issues with [English] people, like the fact Northern Ireland had its own prime minister, cabinet and parliament that was effectively run ‘off the books’ for 50 years, they’re like ‘what?!’

      “When you start to tell people who are not Irish about what went on – gerrymandering, discrimination etc – even if they are pretty knowledgeable about British politics and British history, you can see their eyes going wide. They’re like, ‘why do I not know any of this, this is extraordinary!’

      “So this book tries to fill in lots of gaps [in their knowledge] that they might have, from ‘how did the Troubles start?’ and what they were about, what ‘this Good Friday Agreement thing’ was about and all the rest of it.”

      On the subject of the agreement, shifting demographics within the north in the era of a potentially economically destructive Brexit endorsed and precipitated by a now fragmented DUP against the will of the majority here, plus the ongoing rise of Sinn Féin as a political entity in the Republic mean that the prospect of border polls on the reunification of Ireland have never seemed more likely.

      Thus Northern Ireland’s 100th birthday has coincided with the onset of a political endgame which may see it cease to exist in the near future – and there will be no tears shed at Westminster over that prospect.

      …. He continues: “Every opinion poll in the last 12 months suggests that Sinn Féin may plausibly be in government down south soon, while in the north the unionist vote is splintering and the the DUP may find themselves losing votes to the UUP, Alliance and TUV at the same time – and I don’t think Edwin Poots is the man to salvage that situation.

      “If Sinn Féin potentially top the poll in the north at the next assembly election, that gives you a Sinn Féin first minister and a Sinn Féin taoiseach. In terms of the optics of ‘is there demand for a border poll?’, I think at that point you start to say ‘if that isn’t evidence of it, then what is?'”

      https://www.irishnews.com/arts/2021/05/22/news/what-a-bloody-awful-country-ex-labour-adviser-kevin-meagher-s-book-on-100-years-of-northern-ireland-2329867/

  39. Sam says:

    so now they put too much liquidity in and they want to take it out hmmmmm I wonder how this is all going to work?

  40. That’s not nice!

    Business Insider
    Greta Thunberg calls out Chinese state-run media for ‘fat-shaming’ her in a scathing article that questioned her veganism
    Joshua Zitser
    Sat, May 22, 2021, 7:42 AM
    Greta Thunberg
    Swedish founder of the “School Strike for Climate” movement Greta Thunberg speaks on the sidelines of talks between representatives of the movement and German Chancellor in Berlin on August 20, 2020. ODD ANDERSEN/AFP via Getty Images
    More
    An article in the China Daily accused Greta Thunberg of lying about being a vegetarian.

    The China Daily is a newspaper owned by the propaganda department of China’s ruling Communist Party.

    She responded on Twitter by calling being a “fat-shamed” a “pretty weird experience

    Greta Thunberg has called out Chinese state media for “fat-shaming” her in a scathing article that questioned her vegetarianism, the Independent reported.

    The article published last week by the China Daily, a newspaper owned by the propaganda department of the ruling Chinese Communist Party, implied that the 18-year-old climate activist was lying about her meat-free diet.

    “Although she claims to be vegetarian, judging from the results of her growth, her carbon emissions are actually not low,” wrote the China Daily journalist Tang Ge.

    Thunberg, who is a vegan, responded to the article on Twitter on Friday. She described how being “fat-shamed” by a wing of the Chinese government was a “pretty weird” experience.

    Greta, that’s part of the show, girl. Don’t do anything rash…they are playing head games…

    • I have two female cousins who weren’t always overweight. Before they became vegetarians, they were lean and healthy. The problem with vegetarianism is that weight-gain occurs when people eat too many complex carbohydrates (e.g. beans, oatmeal, bread, potatoes, etc.). Some vegetarians are either unaware of this problem, and fail to consume a greater amount of leafy green vegetables, nuts and nutrient-rich berries, or they rely on complex carbohydrates as comfort foods.
      To be fair, one wouldn’t want to eliminate all complex carbohydrates as they are great sources of energy. Imagine attempting to get through your work day, or some form of moderate exercise, relying only on leafy green vegetables, nuts and berries. I’ve read stories of competitive athletes consuming whole loaves of bread, or giant bowls of oatmeal, prior to their sporting events. They understand the energy that comes from complex carbohydrates – it’s like rocket fuel. For the rest of the largely sedentary population though, it would be a better idea to keep any eye on complex carbohydrate intake. Hell, managing simple and complex carbohydrate intake would be a great first step toward shrinking the waistlines of many while reducing inflammation and insulin spikes.
      Additionally, for every gram of carbohydrate stored as glycogen, the body stores 2-3 grams of water. One of the first things that happens upon significantly decreasing carbohydrate intake for more than a few days is frequent urination, as the body begins to shed the excess water it was storing. Shedding the water alone will often produce a more satisfying appearance to the person controlling their carbohydrate intake. This can also motivate them toward sticking with the plan as they begin to lose body fat. Interestingly, it is possible for the person to lose excess body fat without any exercise if they’re able to eat nutritious, whole foods while maintaining their carbohydrate intake at a level that is commensurate with their activity level.

      So, the China Daily has it wrong. It’s entirely possible for Greta to be an unfailing vegetarian or vegan and still be overweight. Additionally, there’s nothing low-carbon or earth-friendly about modern industrial agriculture practices.
      Ironically, were Greta to introduce grass-fed beef into her diet she would likely shrink while benefiting from the additional omega-3 fatty acids, electrolytes, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) which reduces the risk of heart disease and is one of the strongest nutrients to defend against cancer, vitamins E, B6, B12 (prevents brain fog, fatigue, nerve damage), selenium, iron and zinc. All of these beneficial nutrients would also come in handy should she someday choose to become a mother and raise the next generation of intolerable child activists. Then again, were she to have an excellent nutrition profile prior to impregnation, and maintain it throughout her pregnancy, her own worldview may improve and her child may never wish to become an intolerable activist. Her child, having a better chance at being born healthy and fit, may never come to view humanity as being so contemptible.

      • “The Beano has… decided to stop using the name of one of its most popular personalities to avoid offending young readers…

        “…the character Frederick Brown will no longer be referred to as ‘Fatty” in The Bash Street Kids comic strip…

        “Mike Stirling, editorial director of Beano Studios, said: “Kids come in all shapes and sizes, and we absolutely celebrate that. We don’t want to risk someone using it in a mean way. The time is right to revert back to Freddy.”

        https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2021/05/21/beano-replace-character-fatty-freddy-stop-children-using-name/

        • Fast Eddy says:

          Yes let’s send the message that it’s just fine to be obese… let’s not promote healthy diets … fitness… nothing wrong with being obese — everyone else is!

          Until the diabetes kicks in … the high BP… heart disease… etc…

          It’s actually a good thing that most people think this way… less competition

        • Xabier says:

          In the letters of Dorothy Wordsworth, early 19th-century, she uses ‘fat’ as a high compliment: ‘your husband is looking nice and fat’, ‘the baby is a lovely little fatty’, etc.

          To be thin was associated with poverty and/or ill-health, most usually cancer or TB.

          Of course, they didn’t consume junk food, and ‘fat’ didn’t mean obese.

          • NomadicBeer says:

            I have met people in poor countries that still use “fat” as a compliment: “Your girlfriend is fat and beautiful” for example.
            And yes, “fat” in this case would be normal weight which something like 20% of westerners are (most are obese, some are unhealthy skinny).

            The weird part is that humans are obligate omnivores (i.e. we need to eat meat to survive) and yet even here there are people saying that you can be vegan and healthy.
            No traditional society anywhere survived without animal fats and proteins (yes, even in India).

            Veganism/vegetarianism is another perfect example of succesful propaganda. Despite decades of studies showing that eggs and butter are healthy while soy is not, people will kill themselves for an insane idea.

            For those that still have doubts please search Lierre Keith (of the Deep Green Resistance).

            • One of the Thai brands that we use for soy sauce is marketed domestically as FAT BOY brand (this will make him scoff his grub) – in UK it is marketed in the exact same bottle as HEALTHY BOY brand. LOL You can google it.

            • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
              Gail Tverberg says:

              Vegetarian (including eating dairy products and perhaps eggs) seems to work. Adding fish (excluding those grown with antibiotics) seems to be fine as well. It is very easy to go overboard on processed food. I don’t know of any life expectancy study of vegans that comes out well.

      • Thanks for clearing up the matter…
        Obviously, if one can not attack the message, attack the messager…in this case poor Greta, who just turned 18 teen🎂.
        Doesn’t China derive like 70% of it’s electricity from King Coal?
        If you roll with the Coal, you got to pay the toll….
        All this about decarbonization of the Economy is just PR Pooey…
        Not that it debunks the Science of basic Physics and Chemistry.
        Agree with Gail 100% here….BAU must continue or collapse..
        So, we will all pretend there are solutions that will fix the problem(s).
        Pretty much kick the can down the road until the road ends..
        Greta means well, and she has a platform to help those make money in their transition to a new clean energy future….
        Oh. By the way. How’s the Artic sea ice holding up…I know, I know
        It’s covered just fine….

        • Malcopian says:

          Extinction of humanity by 2027 because of the ongoing methane burp, says Malcolm Light

          http://arctic-news.blogspot.com/2021/05/extinction-by-2027.html

        • Fast Eddy says:

          Geeta is a MOREON. But she serves a purpose.. she is the voice of hope.

          • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
            Gail Tverberg says:

            Right! “A voice of hope” is what is needed.

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        It is possible to be a vegetarian and try to subsist on cakes, cookies and candies. There is no requirement for common sense in trying to find a balanced diet.

      • Sam says:

        maybe they are prepping and loading up for the end times….much easier than having to stock a bunch off food or bring it with you..it is right on them at all times!

        • This is incredibly grim and off-putting but seems pertinent to the discussion here:

          Not long ago I came across an idea online that the great masses are purposely being fattened up through excess carbohydrate consumption, much like how livestock is purposely fattened up through largely grain-based dieting. The ultimate purpose: supporting cannibalism. A horrific prospect, but perhaps the overweight masses are being setup to serve as short-to-medium-term food supply, should things get really desperate during a SHTF scenario.

          Now go read a beautiful sonnet to cleanse your psyche.

          • Tim Groves says:

            I think you read — or watch — too much science fiction.

          • Yorchichan says:

            As an efficient food supply, rather than a source of sadistic pleasure, eating humans could not work for very long. The reason is the same as the reason the scene in “The Road” where some humans are being kept in the basement of a house to gradually be eaten is ridiculous. The reason is that in order for the farmed humans to live for very long, it is necessary to keep feeding them. This is less efficient, maybe 90% less efficient, than the farmers simply eating the food themselves, which is what they would do in a time of food scarcity. Humans as food would need to be killed and eaten quickly.

            “You will eat less meat.”

  41. fas says:

    Funny!

    https://www.statista.com/statistics/1107434/victims-coronavirus-age-france/

    I am seeing one child dead from Covid in Canada… 5 in the UK….

  42. Pingback: Today’s Contemplation: Collapse Cometh XV – Olduvai.ca

  43. Yoshua says:

    The banks have too much cash on their balance sheets and are parking the cash at the Fed in exchange for treasuries.

    The banks are selling assets, maybe cryptos and parking the money at the Fed?

    The Fed has created a lot of empty bubbles like cryptos through QE and ZIRP….and banks and hedge funds are now exiting those bubbles?

  44. Yoshua says:

    The Fed is actually sucking out excess liquidity from the markets though Reverse Repo and that is killing the cryptos. (This was new for me)

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/E17SNt5X0Acesy0?format=jpg&name=large

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      “Peak market liquidity” seems like it would be something that could put a lid on additional borrowing.

      • Duncan Idaho says:

        ” Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next.

        We can choose to walk through it, dragging the carcasses of our prejudice and hatred, our avarice, our data banks and dead ideas, our dead rivers and smoky skies behind us. Or we can walk through lightly, with little luggage, ready to imagine another world. And ready to fight for it. ”
        (Financial Times, April 3, 2020)

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          We can imagine food and fresh water as well. We need the real stuff, however.

          • Fast Eddy says:

            Imagine there’s no heaven
            It’s easy if you try
            No hell below us
            Above us, only sky
            Imagine all the people
            Livin’ for today
            Ah
            Imagine there’s no countries
            It isn’t hard to do
            Nothing to kill or die for
            And no religion, too
            Imagine all the people
            Livin’ life in peace
            You
            You may say I’m a dreamer
            But I’m not the only one
            I hope someday you’ll join us
            And the world will be as one
            Imagine no possessions
            I wonder if you can
            No need for greed or hunger
            A brotherhood of man
            Imagine all the people
            Sharing all the world
            You
            You may say I’m a dreamer
            But I’m not the only one
            I hope someday you’ll join us
            And the world will live as one

            And then the bad guys arrive… beat your face to pulp… rape your women … steal your food…. eat your children (while you watch)… then they eat you … and move on to the next Doomie Prepper..

            Imagine That!!!!

          • Xabier says:

            By 2050, Gail, ‘a body will no longer be needed by a human being’, according to our masters.

            To which the answer is, of course, that technology needs to be ‘fed’ too…..

        • Fast Eddy says:

          Hahahaha…. tripe….

        • Lastcall says:

          ‘…..with little luggage…….And ready to fight for it….’

          The wokesters writing this tedium are carrying more baggage than any previous generation this side of de-nile.

          They are not at all prepared for the awakening coming down the pike.

          The Green New Steal is the worst; all lined up in safe spaces with nice cheap clothes, new smart-ass phone and full stomachs.protesting mining/fishing/farming/roading…

          Stop the trucks for a week and really focus those fine fresh minds’ on sustainabilty; theirs.

          Imagine.

  45. Yoshua says:

    Nobel prize winner claims that vaccines are creating new variants of the virus. Everybody knows but is silent about it.

    https://greatgameindia.com/covid-19-vaccines-creating-variants/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

    • Tim Groves says:

      Yes, this is huge! We have to add Luc Montagnier to the Parthenon.

      Here’s what he’s saying.

      Nobel Prize winner French Virologist Prof. Luc Montagnier in an interview has made a startling claim that the COVID-19 vaccines itself are creating variants. He said that epidemiologists know but are “silent” about the phenomenon, known as “Antibody-Dependent Enhancement” (ADE). While it is understood that viruses mutate, causing variants, Luc Montagnier contends that “it is the vaccination that is creating the variants.”

      (Isn’t that just what I’ve been saying?)

      Prof. Montagnier referred to the vaccine program for the coronavirus as an “unacceptable mistake”. Mass vaccinations are a “scientific error as well as a medical error,” he said. “It is an unacceptable mistake. The history books will show that, because it is the vaccination that is creating the variants,” Prof. Luc Montagnier continued.

      The prominent virologist explained that “there are antibodies, created by the vaccine,” forcing the virus to “find another solution” or die. This is where the variants are created. It is the variants that “are a production and result from the vaccination.”

      Prof. Montagnier said that epidemiologists know but are “silent” about the phenomenon, known as “Antibody-Dependent Enhancement” (ADE).

      Prof. Montagnier explained that the trend is happening in “each country” where “the curve of vaccination is followed by the curve of deaths.”

      (Isn’t that just what I’ve been saying?)

      We observed the same in India as well. India saw nearly 750% increase in COVID-19 cases in less than a month. Was this spike logical? Did the mass vaccination drive in the metro cities cause the second COVID-19 wave in India? Or is there something else?

      (Fine words and big claims, professor; but can you prove it?)

      Prof. Luc Montagnier continued to say that he is doing his own experiments with those who become infected with the coronavirus after getting the vaccine. “I will show you that they are creating the variants that are resistant to the vaccine,” he said.

      And this video shows him saying all that in French with English subtitles.

      https://greatgameindia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/NobelPrizeWinnerProf.LucMontagnierExplainsHowCOVID-19VaccinesAreCreatingVariants.mp4

      • Fast Eddy says:

        So Bosshy has a new best friend…. it is obvious there is something not right about these vaccines… made in just a few months and hell bent to put them into as many people as possible…

        But now we have major scientists on board with what is clearly an extermination agenda (CEP)

        Devil Covid it is. Look forward to it.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        I must thank Luc for putting the Stamp of Approval on the CEP.

        I knew he wouldn’t let me down after he stated emphatically that Covid was made in a lab…

  46. “Cyprus said Friday it is in a “state of emergency” because of an inflow of Syrian migrants that has flooded its reception centres, appealing for help from the European Union.”

    https://www.france24.com/en/live-news/20210521-cyprus-says-state-of-emergency-over-syria-migrant-inflow

  47. “Bitcoin flash crash amplified by leverage and ‘systemic issues’…

    “The scale of the losses and recovery in such a short time, coupled with the frenetic nature of the trading, illustrate how even as the digital asset industry has grown rapidly, many systems underlying the market remain fragile…”

    https://www.ft.com/content/b26319f6-6cb7-4e0e-a0d9-bac71d9b8c34

    • “Bitcoin turmoil seeps into traditional financial markets.

      “A huge drop and snap back in cryptocurrency prices this week rippled into traditional asset classes, potentially offering a taste of what could happen in the event of a more severe shake-up.”

      https://www.ft.com/content/929828cd-51d2-4ae0-b838-47647736c13c

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Bitcoin doesn’t act as a source of stability at all!

  48. “Fed’s Tools Showing Signs of Stress Against the Cash Onslaught…

    “The deluge of cash in the short-end is threatening to create fissures in the Federal Reserve’s key rates corridor, increasing chances policy makers will be forced to adjust their tools to defend the floor.”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-05-21/fed-s-tools-showing-signs-of-stress-against-the-cash-onslaught

    • “The Fed this summer will take another step in developing a digital currency…

      ““Our focus is on ensuring a safe and efficient payment system that provides broad benefits to American households and businesses while also embracing innovation,” said Chairman Jerome Powell.”

      https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/20/the-fed-this-summer-will-take-another-step-ahead-in-developing-a-digital-currency.html

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      More people are becoming worried that the financial system will not hold up under the current stress.

      • I read today that the California seirra snowpack is no more than 1 or 2% of what it should be for this time of year

        which means it’s effectively gone

        I think that’s more to worry about long term than the state of the nation’s finances

  49. “Global inflation-linked bonds continued to attract buyers in the week ended May 19, as investors protected themselves against rising consumer prices in the United States…

    “Minutes of the Fed’s most recent meeting published this week said “a number” of officials believed it might be appropriate to “begin discussing a plan for adjusting the pace of asset purchases” if the economic recovery holds up.”

    https://www.reuters.com/business/global-markets-flows-graphics-2021-05-21/

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