Is the debt bubble supporting the world economy in danger of collapsing?

The years between 1981 and 2020 were very special years for the world economy because interest rates were generally falling:

Figure 1. Yields on 10-year and 3-month US Treasuries, in a chart made by the Federal Reserve of St. Louis, as of May 10, 2022.

In some sense, falling interest rates meant that debt was becoming increasingly affordable. The monthly out-of-pocket expense for a new $500,000 mortgage was falling lower and lower. Automobile payments for a new $30,000 vehicle could more easily be accommodated into a person’s budget. A business would find it more affordable to add $5,000,000 in new debt to open at an additional location. With these beneficial effects, it would be no surprise if a debt bubble were to form.

With an ever-lower cost of debt, the economy has had a hidden tailwind pushing it long between 1981 to 2020. Now that interest rates are again rising, the danger is that a substantial portion of this debt bubble may collapse. My concern is that the economy may be heading for an incredibly hard landing because of the inter-relationship between interest rates and energy prices (Figure 2), and the important role energy plays in powering the economy.

Figure 2. Chart showing the important role Quantitative Easing (QE) to lower interest rates plays in adjusting the level of “demand” (and thus the selling price) for oil. Lower interest rates make goods and services created with higher-priced oil more affordable. In addition to the items noted on the chart, US QE3 was discontinued in 2014, about the time of the 2014 oil price crash. Also, the debt bubble crash of 2008 seems to be the indirect result of the US raising short term interest rates (Figure 1) in the 2004 to 2007 period.

In this post, I will try to explain my concerns.

[1] Ever since civilization began, a combination of (a) energy consumption and (b) debt has been required to power the economy.

Under the laws of physics, energy is required to power the economy. This happens because it takes the “dissipation” of energy to perform any activity that contributes to GDP. The energy dissipated can be the food energy that a person eats, or it can be wood or coal or another material burned to provide energy. Sometimes the energy dissipated is in the form of electricity. Looking back, we can see the close relationship between total energy consumption and world total GDP.

Figure 3. World energy consumption for the period 1990 to 2020, based on energy data from BP’s 2021 Statistical Review of World Energy and world Purchasing Power Parity GDP in 2017 International Dollars, as published by the World Bank.

The need for debt or some other approach that acts as a funding mechanism for capital expenditures (sale of shares of stock, for example), comes from the fact that humans make investments that will not produce a return for many years. For example, ever since civilization began, people have been planting crops. In some cases, there is a delay of a few months before a crop is produced; in other cases, such as with fruit or nut trees, there can be a delay of years before the investment pays back. Even the purchase by an individual of a home or a vehicle is, in a sense, an investment that will offer a return over a period of years.

With all parts of the economy benefiting from the lower interest rates (except, perhaps, banks and others lending the funds, who are making less profit from the lower interest rates), it is easy to see why lower interest rates would tend to stimulate new investment and drive up demand for commodities.

Commodities are used in great quantity, but the supply available at any one time is tiny by comparison. A sudden increase in demand will tend to send the commodity price higher because the quantity of the commodity available will need to be rationed among more would-be purchasers. A sudden decrease in the demand for a commodity (for example, crude oil, or wheat) will tend to send prices lower. Therefore, we see the strange sharp corners in Figure 2 that seem to be related to changing debt levels and higher or lower interest rates.

[2] The current plan of central banks is to raise interest rates aggressively. My concern is that this approach will leave commodity prices too low for producers. They will be tempted to decrease or stop production.

Politicians are concerned about the price of food and fuel being too high for consumers. Lenders are concerned about interest rates being too low to properly compensate for the loss of value of their investments due to inflation. The plan, which is already being implemented in the United States, is to raise interest rates and to significantly reverse Quantitative Easing (QE). Some people call the latter Quantitative Tightening (QT).

The concern that I have is that aggressively raising interest rates and reversing QE will lead to commodity prices that are too low for producers. There are likely to be many other impacts as well, such as the following:

  • Lower energy supply, due to cutbacks in production and lack of new investment
  • Lower food supply, due to inadequate fertilizer and broken supply lines
  • Much defaulting of debt
  • Pension plans that reduce or stop payments because of debt-related problems
  • Falling prices of stock
  • Defaults on derivatives

[3] My analysis shows how important increased energy consumption has been to economic growth over the last 200 years. Energy consumption per capita has been growing during this entire period, except during times of serious economic distress.

Figure 4. World energy consumption from 1820-2010, based on data from Appendix A of Vaclav Smil’s Energy Transitions: History, Requirements and Prospects and BP Statistical Review of World Energy for 1965 and subsequent. Wind and solar energy are included in “Biofuels.”

Figure 4 shows the amazing growth in world energy consumption between 1820 and 2010. In the early part of the period, the energy used was mostly wood burned as fuel. In some parts of the world, animal dung was also used as fuel. Gradually, other fuels were added to the mix.

Figure 5. Estimated average annual increase in world energy consumption over 10-year periods using the data underlying Figure 4, plus similar additional data through 2020.

Figure 5 takes the same information shown in Figure 4 and calculates the average approximate annual increase in world energy consumption over 10-year periods. A person can see from this chart that the periods from 1951-1960 and from 1961-1970 were outliers on the high side. This was the time of rebuilding after World War II. Many families were able to own a car for the first time. The US highway interstate system was begun. Many pipelines and electricity transmission lines were built. This building continued into the 1971-1980 period.

Figure 6. Same chart as Figure 5, except that the portion of economic growth that was devoted to population growth is shown in blue at the bottom of each 10-year period. The amount of growth in energy consumption “left over” for improvement in the standard of living is shown in red.

Figure 6 displays the same information as Figure 5, except that each column is divided into two pieces. The lower (blue) portion represents the average annual growth in population during each period. The part left over at the top (in red) represents the growth in energy consumption that was available for increases in standard of living.

Figure 7. The same information displayed in Figure 6, displayed as an area chart. Blue areas represent average annual population growth percentages during these 10-year periods. The red area is determined by subtraction. It represents the amount of energy consumption growth that is “left over” for growth in the standard of living. Captions show distressing events during periods of low increases in the portion available to raise standards of living.

Figure 7 shows the same information as Figure 6, displayed as an area chart. I have also shown some of the distressing events that happened when growth in population was, in effect, taking up essentially all of energy consumption growth. The world economy could not grow normally. There was a tendency toward conflict. Unusual events would happen during these periods, including the collapse of the central government of the Soviet Union and the restrictions associated with the COVID pandemic.

The economy is a self-organizing system that behaves strangely when there is not enough inexpensive energy of the right types available to the system. Wars tend to start. Layers of government may disappear. Strange lockdowns may occur, such as the current restrictions in China.

[4] The energy situation at the time of rising interest rates in the 1960 to 1980 period was very different from today.

If we define years with high inflation rates as those with inflation rates of 5% or higher, Figure 8 shows that the period with high US inflation rates included nearly all the years from 1969 through 1982. Using a 5% inflation cutoff, the year 2021 would not qualify as a high inflation rate year.

Figure 8. US inflation rates, based on Table 1.1.4 Price Index for Gross Domestic Product, published by the US Bureau of Economic Analysis.

It is only when we look at annualized quarterly data that inflation rates start spiking to high levels. Inflation rates have been above 5% in each of the four quarters ended 2022-Q1. Trade problems related to the Ukraine Conflict have tended to add to price pressures recently.

Figure 9. US inflation rates, based on Table 1.1.4 Price Index for Gross Domestic Product, published by the US Bureau of Economic Analysis.

Underlying these price spikes are increases in the prices of many commodities. Some of this represents a bounce back from artificially low prices that began in late 2014, probably related to the discontinuation of US QE3 (See Figure 2). These prices were far too low for producers. Coal and natural gas prices have also needed to rise, as a result of depletion and prior low prices. Food prices are also rising rapidly, since food is grown and transported using considerable quantities of fossil fuels.

The main differences between that period leading up to 1980 and now are the following:

[a] The big problem in the 1970s was spiking crude oil prices. Now, our problems seem to be spiking crude oil, natural gas and coal prices. In fact, nuclear power may also be a problem because a significant portion of uranium processing is performed in Russia. Thus, we now seem to be verging on losing nearly all our energy supplies to conflict or high prices!

[b] In the 1970s, there were many solutions to the crude oil problem, which were easily implemented. Electricity production could be switched from crude oil to coal or nuclear, with little problem, apart from building the new infrastructure. US cars were very large and fuel inefficient in the early 1970s. These could be replaced with smaller, more fuel-efficient vehicles that were already being manufactured in Europe and Japan. Home heating could be transferred to natural gas or propane, to save crude oil for places where energy density was really needed.

Today, we are told that a transition to green energy is a solution. Unfortunately, this is mostly wishful thinking. At best, a transition to green energy will need a huge investment of fossil fuels (which are increasingly unavailable) over a period of at least 30 to 50 years if it is to be successful. See my article, Limits to Green Energy Are Becoming Much Clearer. Vaclav Smil, in his book Energy Transitions: History, Requirements and Prospects, discusses the need for very long transitions because energy supply needs to match the devices using it. Furthermore, new energy types are generally only add-ons to other supply, not replacements for those supplies.

[c] The types of economic growth in (a) the 1960 to 1980 period and (b) the period since 2008 are very different. In the earlier of these periods (especially prior to 1973), it was easy to extract oil, coal and natural gas inexpensively. Inflation-adjusted oil prices of less than $20 per barrel were typical. An ever-increasing supply of this oil seemed to be available. New machines (created with fossil fuels) made workers increasingly efficient. The economy tended to “overheat” if interest rates were not repeatedly raised (Figure 1). While higher interest rates could be expected to slow the economy, this was of little concern because rapid growth seemed to be inevitable. The supply of finished goods and services made by the economy was growing rapidly, even with headwinds from the higher interest rates.

On the other hand, in the 2008 to 2020 period, economic growth is largely the result of financial manipulation. The system has been flooded with increasing amounts of debt at ever lower interest rates. By the time of the lockdowns of 2020, would-be workers were being paid for doing nothing. World production of finished goods and services declined in 2020, and it has had difficulty rising since. In the first quarter of 2022, the US economy contracted by -1.4%. If headwinds from higher interest rates and QT are added, the economic system is likely to encounter substantial debt defaults and increasing breakdowns of supply lines.

[5] Today’s spiking energy prices appear to be much more closely related to the problems of the 1913 to 1945 era than they are to the problems of the late 1970s.

Looking back at Figure 7, our current period is more like the period between the two world wars than the period in the 1970s that we often associate with high inflation. In both periods, the “red” portion of the chart (the portion I identify with rising standard of living), has pretty much disappeared. In both the 1913 to 1945 period and today, it is nearly all the energy supplies other than biofuels that are disappearing.

In the 1913 to 1945 period, the problem was coal. Mines were becoming increasingly depleted, but raising coal prices to pay for the higher cost of extracting coal from depleted mines tended to make the coal prohibitively expensive. Mine operators tried to reduce wages, but this was not a solution either. Fighting broke out among countries, almost certainly related to inadequate coal supplies. Countries wanted coal to supply to their citizens so that industry could continue, and so that citizens could continue heating their homes.

Figure 10. Slide prepared by Gail Tverberg showing peak coal estimates for the UK and for Germany.

As stated at the beginning of this section, today’s problem is that nearly all our energy supplies are becoming unaffordable. In some sense, wind and solar may look better, but this is because of mandates and subsidies. They are not suitable for operating the world economy within any reasonable time frame.

There are other parallels to the 1913 to 1945 period. One of the big problems of the 1930s was prices that would not rise high enough for farmers to make a profit. Oil prices in the United States were extraordinarily low then. BP 2021 Statistical Review of World Energy reports that the average oil price in 1931, in 2020 US$, was $11.08. This is the lowest inflation-adjusted price of any year back to 1865. Such a price was almost certainly too low for producers to make a profit. Low prices, relative to rising costs, have recently been problems for both farmers and oil producers.

Another major problem of the 1930s was huge income disparity. Wide income disparity is again an issue today, thanks to increased specialization. Competition with unskilled workers in low wage countries is also an issue.

It is important to note that the big problem of the 1930s was deflation rather than inflation, as the debt bubble started popping in 1929.

[6] If a person looks only at the outcome of raising interest rates in the 1960s to 1980 timeframe, it is easy to get a misleading idea of the impact of increased interest rates now.

If people look only at what happened in the 1980s, the longer-term impact of the spike in interest rates doesn’t seem too severe. The world economy was growing well before the interest rates were raised. After the peak in interest rates, the world economy generally continued to grow. As a result of the high oil prices and the spiking interest rates, the world hastened its transition to using a bit less crude oil per person.

Figure 11. Per capita crude oil production from 1973 through 2021. Crude oil amounts are from international statistics of the US Energy Information Administration. Population estimates are from UN 2019 population estimates. The low population growth projection from the UN data is used for 2021.

At the same time, the world economy was able to expand the use of other energy products, at least through 2018.

Figure 12. World per capita total energy supply based on data from BP’s 2021 Statistical Review of World Energy. World per capita crude oil is based on international data of the EIA, together with UN 2019 population estimates. Note that crude oil data is through 2021, but total energy amounts are only through 2020.

Since 2019, our problem has been that the total energy supply has not been keeping up with the rising population. The cost of extraction of all kinds of oil, coal and natural gas keeps rising due to depletion, but the ability of customers to afford the higher prices of finished goods and services made with those energy products does not rise to match these higher costs. Energy prices probably would have spiked in 2020 if it were not for COVID-related restrictions. Production of oil, coal and natural gas has not been able to rise sufficiently after the lockdowns for economies to fully re-open. This is the primary reason for the recent spiking of energy prices.

Turning to inflation rates, the relationship between higher interest rates (Figure 1) and annual inflation rates (Figure 8) is surprisingly not very close. Inflation rates rose during the 1960 to 1973 period despite rising interest rates, mostly likely because of the rapid growth of the economy from an increased per-capita supply of inexpensive energy.

Figure 8 shows that inflation rates did not come down immediately after interest rates were raised to a high level in 1980, either. There was a decline in the inflation rate to 4% in 1983, but it was not until the collapse of the central government of the Soviet Union in 1991 that inflation rates have tended to stay close to 2% per year.

[7] A more relevant recent example with respect to the expected impact of rising interest rates is the impact of the increase in US short-term interest rates in the 2004 to 2007 period. This led to the subprime debt collapse in the US, associated with the Great Recession of 2008-2009.

Looking back at Figure 1, one can see the effect of raising short-term interest rates in the 2004 to 2007 era. This eventually led to the Great Recession of 2008-2009. I wrote about this in my academic paper, Oil Supply Limits and the Continuing Financial Crisis, published in the journal Energy in 2010.

The situation we are facing today is much more severe than in 2008. The debt bubble is much larger. The shortage of energy products has spread beyond oil to coal and natural gas, as well. The idea of raising interest rates today is very much like going into the Great Depression and deciding to raise interest rates because bankers don’t feel like they are getting an adequate share of the goods and services produced by the economy. If there really aren’t enough goods and services for everyone, giving lenders a larger share of the total supply cannot work out well.

[8] The problems we are encountering have been hidden for many years by an outdated understanding of how the economy operates.

Because of the physics of the economy, it behaves very differently than most people assume. People almost invariably assume that all aspects of the economy can “stay together” regardless of whether there are shortages of energy or of other products. People also assume that shortages will be immediately become obvious through high prices, without realizing the huge role interest rates and debt levels play. People further assume that these spiking prices will somehow bring about greater supply, and the whole system will go on as before. Furthermore, they expect that whatever resources are in the ground, which we have the technical capability to extract, can be extracted.

It is important to note that prices are not necessarily a good indicator of shortages. Just as a fever can have many causes, high prices can have many causes.

The economy can only continue as long as all of its important parts continue. We cannot assume that reported reserves of anything can really be extracted, even if the reserves have been audited by a reliable auditor. What actually can be extracted depends on prices staying high enough to generate funds for additional investment as required. The amount that can be extracted also depends on the continuation of international supply lines providing goods such as steel pipe. The continued existence of governments that can keep order in the areas where extraction is to take place is important, as well.

What we should be most concerned about is a very rapidly shrinking economic system that cannot accommodate very many people. It seems that such a situation might occur if the debt bubble is popped and too many supply lines are broken. There may be a time lag between when interest rates are raised and when the adverse impacts on the economy are seen. This is a reason why central bankers should be very cautious about the increases in interest rates they make as well as QT. The situation may turn out much worse than planned!

About Gail Tverberg

My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
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4,216 Responses to Is the debt bubble supporting the world economy in danger of collapsing?

  1. “Currency Slump, 132% Inflation No Cause for ‘Panic’ in Zimbabwe.

    ““We are instituting measures that every other country in the world is instituting,” Ncube said in an interview with Bloomberg Television’s Manus Cranny and Yousef Gamal El-Din from Davos on Thursday. “We are not in panic mode.””

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-26/currency-slump-132-inflation-no-cause-for-panic-in-zimbabwe

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      In Zimbabwe, residents need to start growing their food and energy supplies locally!

    • Isn’t a 132% Inflation rate low for Zimbabwe?

      Currency Slump – Zimbabwe’s currency has been close to worthless for years. So it is slumping from one level of not-worth-very-much to another.

    • Fast Eddy says:

      it’s very disappointing to not see videos of food riots… I was certain that by this point we’d get exciting coverage of mayhem and burning… this might be the most disappointing extinction ever

    • Fast Eddy says:

      A wise society would sing Koombaya

    • the ‘wise society’ article, though interesting is describing a beehive or an ant colony, where the collective interest of the colony serves the whole, while the surplus numbers willingly sacrifice themselves, should they be required to do so, for the ultimate good of all.

      there can be no ‘humane’ population reduction, because the overwhelming instinct for the majority is the reproduction of self.

      to restrict that, would require

      a—forced sterilisation

      or b, penalties for giving birth

      or c, infanticide.

      dress it up in fancy words, but there are no other options.

      putting the above into force, would require control—and control requires controllers. Who are invariably unpleasant individuals.

      while the article, as the writer says, is nothing more than a daydream, it’s as well to point out at least one problem–though there are dozens contained within it.

      • Kowalainen says:

        “the overwhelming instinct for the majority is the reproduction of self”

        Perhaps you’re confusing sexuality with reproduction?

        I doubt most men got a serious itch about reproduction, busting the nuts however. 🥜 🤣👍

        It is rather the females being subject to the collective subconscious seek “meaning” and acceptance from the herd (status, validation, narcissism basically) through the act of reproduction. And the Beta male complies.

        Oh yeah Normal; just sayin… 😉

        In reality most of them (males, females) are totally unfit for having the responsibility of raising a sapient and sentient being.

        IQ, “big 5” tests and other cognitive/psychological tests should be employed for qualifying “breeders”. Yeah, and not being vaxxed goes without saying.

        ☺️

        • Kow, you reveal a lack of knowledge of the female psyche.

          a man may ‘want sex’…but the general (not all of course) inclination of the woman is reproduction. In most mf relationships they strike an emotional bargain that results in a child being reared to reproductive age.

          To that end she will seek out a male to provide the means. It is she who does the choosing. (Though she might massage the male ego by letting him think otherwise)

          (watch any nature TV program–all animals function in the same way.)–except for the ’emotional bargain’ part.

          The point about ‘sexuality’ is to add an urge to the process of reproduction. The fact that we have sex for recreational purposes is just a human quirk, and irrelevant.

          Not that I expect you to have a clue what I’m talking about.

          • Oddys says:

            Oh. That was a lot of aggregated wisdom in one single post. Very many very smart people here tonight.

          • Kowalainen says:

            Do you think that both males and females didn’t know about preventive means before someone put semen and an egg under the microscope?

            Well; a primate is going to mate the way a primate is going to mate. The male projects it’s tryhard and the female expects moar.

            It is good that you read my posts from time to time. It doesn’t save a failed species however.

            1. Boom
            2. Overshoot
            3. Collapse/Bust
            4. Bottleneck
            5. See 1.

            Look; we ain’t getting smarter as a species. It is no way around the archaic regions of our brains being amplified by the neocortex projecting all sorts of primate egotistical fantasies onto objective reality that just doesn’t care.

            Don’t get me wrong. It is entirely reasonable for females to desire children and family. But the female egotistical fantasies doesn’t end there, oh no. Luckily you’re there with that tryhard of yours manifesting as the usual frivolous gimmicks and gadgets of IC.

            It is all good until it isn’t anymore. Which is soon enough. Didn’t you write “The end of MOAR”? No?

            • Kowalainen

              not altogether sure of the thread your reply was following

              Knowing about preventative means, and being able to do something affirmative/positive about it are two different things. We’ve only had effective, universal contraception for about 60 years.

              >>>>The male projects it’s tryhard and the female expects moar.<<<>>>Luckily you’re there with that tryhard of yours manifesting as the usual frivolous gimmicks and gadgets of IC.<<<<<
              you SERIOUSLY lost me on that one too!!
              Made no sense at all.

              What female egostistical fantasies? That's guy thing I would have thought.

              Am i expected get something from your spelling of 'moar'?

              No idea what my book has to do with any of the above?

            • Fast Eddy says:

              Anyone who has a blow up doll as a partner… won’t get it.

            • ah–eddy

              we can always rely on standard comments from you

              still low on the scoring table are we?

              I can let you have a few tips if you like, that will improve your score rate. (success guaranteed)

            • Kowalainen says:

              Yes, you’re oblivious to the egotistical fantasy you’re reveling in. But don’t worry, it is the myopia of ordinary everyday rapacious primate behavior.

              Didn’t you know that females is “responsible” for about 80% of all consumption? Indeed; you’re the proverbial tryhard attaboy “Beta” provider/enabler for that.

              Isn’t it sad, perhaps tragicomic with “Betas” concerned about the well-being of their offspring while blowing through finite resources claiming their “status” within the herd as to be “selected” by females.

              Talk about a Faustian/Freudian “bargain”.

              Ill bet you still got no clue what I’m on about? But don’t you worry.

              The end of MOAR, no?
              It’s all good.
              🤣👍👍

            • Kow

              if your first language isn’t English, then I apologise in advance

              If it is your first language, could you read some books on basic grammar spelling and structure before penning replies?

              >>>>Indeed; you’re the proverbial tryhard attaboy “Beta” provider/enabler for that.<<<<

              what on earth is that supposed to mean?–You lost me there.

              If you really don't know that, in nature, it's females who do the 'selecting' for reproductive purposes, then that's hardly my problem, is it?

            • Fast Eddy says:

              It’s poetry norm… you need to decipher it

            • Fast Eddy says:

              Look; we ain’t getting smarter as a species.

              Definitely not — we’ve been headed in the wrong direction for tens of thousands of years…

              We’ve gone so far off the reservation that we celebrate the innovators who are responsible for putting us on the brink of extinction.

              If you really think about it — IDIOCRACY (the movie) was mocking us… we NEVER should have watered the f789ing plants!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

              hahahahahahaha… Fast Eddy sees shit — that nobody else does.

            • Kowalainen says:

              Yes,

              Strapping a behemoth neocortex onto a primate frame isn’t going to produce much innovation and awareness per calorie of input.

              It will mostly end up as the default rapacious primate theatrics, CO2, vaporware and toxins poisoning earth.

              Ironically it is warfare that produce most technological “advancement”. Our so called “inventors” just cobble together generic bits and bolts, semiconductors, power electronics and software in a nice handheld package (or perhaps on wheels).

              Most ground breaking innovation happened more than a century ago with the exception of semiconductors. Today it is likely some random algorithmic “invention” that nobody understands which provides all the hoopla.

              We’re not really innovating. What you’re observing is merely a logical conclusion from the past.

              Pick your poison:

              1. Total annihilation, or
              2. All machine

              The problem with 2. is that any AGI/sentient, sapient machine will be trained on data collected from rapacious primate shenanigans.

              Those machines will inevitably turn out rather disorderly, schizophrenic and dysfunctional.

              A reflection of the source, so to speak.
              Garbage in – garbage out.
              🤣👍👍

            • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
              Gail Tverberg says:

              Interesting points!

          • lidiaseventeen
            lidiaseventeen says:

            I’ll dispute Norm’s claimed expertise on the female psyche. Women (not universally, but by and large) will go along with what “society” is telling them. Why? Because women are physically weaker than men, and always will be. “Going along” is a survival mechanism. Who tend to be the main champions of The Current Thing™®? Women, I am sorry to say.

            If “society” tells them to wear the veil, they’ll wear the veil. If “society” tells them to agitate for foreign immigration, they’ll agitate for foreign immigration (doesn’t hurt that the immigrants are higher-T, too bad about the concomitant sexual violence, tho’).

            If “society” (Mad Men?) tells them they need to wear girdles and makeup all day to “keep their man”, they’ll do that, and cattily hate on women who don’t conform. If “society” tells them that going out and getting a job and putting their infants in daycare will “liberate” them, they’ll do that, and cattily hate on women who don’t conform. If “society” signals that tattoos and OnlyFans whoredom and being baby mommas to “aspiring rappers” is the way to acceptance.. well…

            Women are… Susceptible.

            Norm’s ideas about women’s desire for reproduction are a bit obsolete. Women are less inclined to reproduce in a society which is sending them messages that reproduction is undesirable.

            Nothing in current Western society supports a woman’s instinct towards reproduction and motherhood: that status is being socially cancelled in favor of sexual freakiness and the celebration of familial dysfunction, and this is reflected in the cultural birth rates.

            The social suppression seems particularly intense when it comes to White/European populations. Less so for the rest of the world. Whites seem to be buying into sterilizing their children with trans BS, ffs. Is that messaging being applied anywhere else? Are Ghanians or Fijians seeking to chop off their daughters’ breasts or their sons’ dicks? I recall that fellow with a distinctive mustache was keen on halting this aberrant trend a few decades ago.

            Media messaging in Europe paints white women who give birth as being responsible for killing the planet, while out of the other side of the media ‘mouth’ the messaging is desperate to bring endless numbers of (fecund) foreigners to “refresh” an aging population.

            Take a look at who is being manipulated into the “trans kid” thing: the very mothers of the children themselves are offering up their own progeny as a virtue-signalling sacrifice. I’m sure the priests of Moloch and those of the sacrifices of the Aztecs worked on the women to sustain and maintain cultural support for their practices.

            I don’t think you can really get society to hew to anything if you don’t convince (corrupt) the women as a basis.

            • Kowalainen says:

              Being insecure, selective and easily manipulated by various symbols of status and prestige ultimately ends in the same predictable way.

              The tryhard beta males simply will do whatever to gain “access” and acceptance from whichever symbols of vanity that is being required to achieve relevance in the “marketplace”.

              Just take a good long look around at the theatrics (sanctimonious hypocrisy, BLM, HTBQYZ, etc.) and exploitation of unfair advantage (corruption, etc.)

              Not much societal innovation will take shape from a bunch of insecure females and dullard Allha/Beta tryhards over the ears in debt and stress.

              It is all retch and no vomit in perpetuity, from a generation to the next ever so slightly a bit more boring and dumber until the symbols of status is counted in how many tree crowns the Alpha assisted by a few Betas can control.

              It is simply not a good idea to strap a large neocortex onto a primitive primate baseline. The default monkey business (primate insecurities and desires) will be amplified by the newfangled processing center.

              Just about anything out of the socially “accepted” will be shunned and ostracized, if not outright murdered by the overly sensitized to societal conditioning. Total and utter stagnation with other words.

              Yes, check out Calhoun’s “Mouse Utopia”:
              https://youtu.be/NgGLFozNM2o

            • i agree with much of what you say lidia.

              but my view of women tries to take a much broader sweep.

              They are after all, the key to species survival–ie they nurture the young… after having the child, they must rear it to reproductive maturity.

              To this end they might be said to accede to ‘male dominance’ because that gives their child the ‘means’ to live.

              So male ‘posturing’ is largely ignored–it leads to warfare and death.

              Women certainly seem to have a better ‘survival’ instinct–at least in my experience..

              That infuriating sentence–‘I really wouldn’t do that if i were you’—which almost always turns out to be right.
              To me, that’s what ‘woman’ is.

              And given freedom of social choice, it is they who do the choosing. If they live in a society where women are just a commodity, then that cannot apply of course

            • Kowalainen says:

              Well, isn’t the female exactly a mere ‘product’ in the era of asocial media and the mechanisms of instant gratification of the feminine egotistical fantasy?

              The product emerges when the message is tailored for maximum effect as it filters through the female insecurities.

              They’re mere primates trying to be selective in an barrage of vanities and superficial drivel that got zero to do with any sense of meaning and purpose, for example, finding a decent enough male to coax into having a family with.

              All else being the smoke and mirrors of WtP fantasy projected by MSM and the usual narrative peddlers. Because somewhere someone got something to sell. And you’ve gotta be asleep to believe in the sales pitch.

              But don’t you worry; just vax ‘em up with the same garbage you’ve got floating in your veins while masking their depression with Xanax and a few “likes”. I’m sure there will be no fertility problems, birth complications and defects by injecting them with unsafe and untested gene therapies.

              Overly socialized people is a burden for a technological society. The whims and wishes of the herd is to be considered suspicious. But hey, an evolutionary trap is an evolutionary trap and we are all free to choose.

            • Fast Eddy says:

              norm is an expert on what blow up women desire… a world expert… he’s also a Big Stud on the Professional Vaccine Tour….

              BTW – remember Century of Self and how easily Bernays convinced women to smoke ciggies….women are herd beasts… just like all humans

            • eddy

              as my my blow up doll often says:

              “the biggest problem in my life is little pricks.”

              so it looks like she will veto your invite to our next orgy.

          • Fast Eddy says:

            Said the geriatric geezer who is in a relationship with something he purchased on Alibaba.com

        • Mike Roberts
          Mike Roberts says:

          Most men may not realise that what they’re doing ends in reproduction, normally. It may not be a conscious instinct but reproduction is a goal of any organism.

          • Fast Eddy says:

            mike!!!! Is that really you??? Back from the Dead (like a Ukele extra!)

            Good to see you back mike – we really thought you’d been to through the incinerator.

            We went almost a week without any illogical ridiculous comments to make us laugh with disgust on OFW….

            Hey look everyone – mike is back!!!!

          • Kowalainen says:

            Tryhard busting nut jobs and moaronic busy beavers unite!
            YOLO!

            MOAR!
            BREED!
            TRUST THE GUVMINT!
            GET VAXXED!

            🤣👍👍

      • nikoB says:

        Starvation it is then.

        • we could share eddy around–that would be a good source of protein for a while

        • Fred says:

          Gold star for an entertainingly incoherent discussion thread.

          Norm started off well, but Kowalainen didactically shelled the shit out of it in his reply, probably inspired by the Russian approach to any Ukrainian fortifications or infrastructure.

          • Kowalainen says:

            They’re trying to evade their innate traits and fate by hallucinated diversion tactics.

            Just imagine the tryhard attaboys beating around the bush with a RPG or javelin slung on their shoulders desiring to put an end to the misery of a few 18 year old pieces of russkie cannon fodder.

            Isn’t petty bestiality rather archetypical for our species?

            Just sayin. (No hate)
            🤣👍👍

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        When the level of world population is as high as it is, and the level the population the world can support is as low as it is, the methods you suggest act to reduce population far too slowly to match the expected decline in food and other energy availability.

        Killing off old people and people in poor health would also “work” as ways of rapidly reducing population.

        The need for more rapid population reduction seems to be the fundamental reason behind all of messing to make viruses more virulent and more transmissible. Or, perhaps, it is simply the way a self-organizing system works.

        It appears that a huge level of change in genetics is needed for successors to current humans to make it through the current bottleneck.
        I understand one way of making such a change is by incorporating parts of viruses into genetic material. Another approach is exposure to a high level of radiation, as from spent fuel pools.

        Perhaps the self-organizing system is pushing the world economy in the direction or rapid genetic change (or the Higher Power behind everything that is happening is doing this). It almost looks like a conspiracy. The new viruses and the “vaccines” against these viruses are part of what might enable such a rapid genetic change, especially if vaccines are given to people who are young enough to reproduce in the future. This may be the hidden reason for the strange way the world has been behaving recently.

        A side “benefit” of the man-made viruses and vaccines is they indirectly help get rid of some of the population that cannot be fed with current resources, quite quickly. This is especially the case if multiple doses of vaccine weaken the immune system, making the multiply boosted more vulnerable to monkeypox.

        Our self-organizing system works very strangely!

        • Artleads says:

          “Our self-organizing system works very strangely!”

          And if we use the meme that there is always someone in the pack that is the smartest and can twist the self organization to his own self interests, the smartest could equally well use their understanding of the self organizing system for the public good.

        • Gail

          your thesis falls at the first hurdle—and I’ve tried to put this over on other threads.

          Assuming that there is a plot (or something) to drastically reduce our numbers

          The plotters, whoever they might be, no doubt assume or desire that BAU should continue on their behalf, supporting their current lifestyle, while we–the poor consuming masses, quietly and conveniently vacate the planet,—either by accident or ‘design’.

          Without our current population, the world economic system collapses. Simply not enough people to make things work.

          It isn’t possible to have a few million ‘elite’ people living in a world run by robots. Robots stop working–they are machines subject to the laws of thermodynamics. just as people are.

          So population ‘deliberate collapse’ fails.

          As I’ve said before, at least grant Bezos the intelligence to realise, that without ‘us’—his warehouses are just empty sheds. Value of ‘stuff’ is only what someone else will pay for it.
          Bezos’ wealth is entirely dependent on all of us playing his game of musical boxes. We play because our ‘surplus’ allows us to. For now.

          just as Rockefellers wealth depended on the rest of us burning his oil. Oil has no ‘value’ until someone uses it.

          I have a mansion, and a ton of gold bricks buried in the back garden.
          They are worth nothing if i cant sell them to someone else.

          **************

          It is difficult to accept, i know, that we unleashed the virus on ourselves by treading too heavily on animal territory, herding them together to make a fast profit.

          for 000s of years most of our major diseases have proven to be zoonotic.
          Viruses are an animal defence mechanism.

          **************

          there is no doubt that world population will soon collapse. Possibly some billionaires imagine that it will not affect them— But it will, though maybe at a slightly slower rate.

          $1Bn in cash is only worth the energy available to support it. Without surplus energy, money is worth zilch. The billionaire is only that because he can ‘command’ energy use from other people. His wealth buys the ‘surplus’ of others. (see Bezos above)
          If that surplus isn’t there, then his $1Bn evaporates.

          Collapse is going to be brutal, in ways we cannot imagine.

          No one will be exempt I’m afraid

          • Nope.avi says:

            “Without our current population, the world economic system collapses

            It isn’t possible to have a few million ‘elite’ people living in a world run by robots. Robots stop working–they are machines subject to the laws of thermodynamics. just as people are.

            So population ‘deliberate collapse’ fails.
            ” You’re giving the ruling class way too much credit. I think I understand when they say ” no one is in charge” when they are confronted with conspiracy accusations. “No one in charge” means they are not driven by rational thinking.

            https://ourfiniteworld.com/2022/05/17/is-the-debt-bubble-supporting-the-world-economy-in-danger-of-collapsing/comment-page-9/#comment-368508

            They are driven by the same things everyone else is. That means they are vulnerable to delusions just as much as anyone else.

            https://www.weforum.org/agenda/archive/space

            Their intelligence is overrated. These guys are good at very specific things but are clueless about the big picture. They are clueless because they don’t want to know. They prefer the fantasy of the automated carbon-neutral utopian future over the most likely outcome. They prefer the idea that they can manage the collapse, that they won’t get hurt and will come on top.
            Why else are the promoting ESG–promoting investment in things they know are unprofitable?

            “just as Rockefellers wealth depended on the rest of us burning his oil. Oil has no ‘value’ until someone uses it.

            I have a mansion, and a ton of gold bricks buried in the back garden.
            They are worth nothing if i cant sell them to someone else.”

            They truly believe solar energy will be just as deirable as oil with the right amount of investment. They have has PLENTY of people and machines willing to buy their possessions. They’re even proposing being elusively the only people allowed to own property so they can always have buyers. The virus has been very good for business. They clearly DON’T need full employment. They have multiple motives both financial and ideological to target people for extermination. We are not all in this together. They think most of us are expendable.

            I know it’s very hard for you to accept, but they do not care if you live or die.

            • i accept that my comment goes against the common grain.
              They often do.

              sorry about that

              You and a few others seem to find this impossible to grasp.
              so here’s a simplification:

              (if it’s wrong–i’m open to correction)–but make it convincing.

              *********

              i own a swathe of New York, (could be any where)..but we’ll stick with NYC

              it’s filled with 000s of apartments and 00000s people, paying me rent. Lovely.

              my balance sheet tells me i’m a multi-billionaire. I have a 200ft yacht and a private jet and a gold plated lavatory.
              OK so far.

              now—the ‘rich elite’ i belong to decide they are going to get rid of those awful poor people who clutter up the planet.
              I agree.
              It’s all their fault we’re screwed up.

              We invent diseases that only affect poor people, leaving rich people like me immune.

              >>>>>> Fast forward>>>>>>>

              NYC is now empty—good riddance says I.

              I decide to ‘retire’

              I put my property empire on the market.

              All those fantastic (empty) apartments. Tenants are such a pain. always wanting things repaired.

              Surprise surprise—nobody wants to buy them. I suddenly find my property empire is worth (quite literally) nothing.
              Desperate for cash–i put my private jet and yacht on the market.

              no takers there either.

              All my multi billionaire buddies are in the same boat–trying to sell stuff that is worth nothing at all.
              Because we killed off all the poor people.

              i suddenly realise i’m broke.

              *******

              you may well be right about the rich elite being stupid–Musk and his Mars fantasy might confirm that…but he could just be kidding to boost his stock valuation. Likely I think.

              things in our future can never be precisely forecast–we can only take a reasonable stab at it. Sometimes i hit it on the button, often I don’t.

              Hold onto your conspiracy theories if you must—but I don’t think ‘rich elites’ are as stupid as I’ve outlined above.

              They are certainly not so stupid as to believe solar power will be as desirable as oil.

              that really is a fairy tale

          • Fred says:

            Is this a sort of vote for FE’s UEP Norm, or is it more a fatalistic assessment of how things will inevitably go given our genetic/social drivers?

            • Kowalainen says:

              Norm has been a nut busting tryhard attaboy serving himself and the busy beaver with all sorts of conveniences and luxuries.

              The archetypal Provider yes man Beta male. And now Normal admitted that moaronic females select on how well males project their tryhard.

              Thus exacerbating the predicament which he is aware of and now worry about the well being of his progeny.

              Ironic, isn’t it?

              The tragicomedy is that it’s nothing wrong with Normal. It is a failure of evolution in the species HSS.

              It is what it is. (No hate)

              🤔

            • >>>>The archetypal Provider yes man Beta male. And now Normal admitted that moaronic females select on how well males project their tryhard.<<<<

              ???????

              i wish i could persuade you to study English usage/grammar/spelling and sentence structure before trying to write coherent replies.

              it would make life easier for everyone else.

            • Fast Eddy says:

              I wish you’d answer questions so we dont have to repeat them….

            • Fast Eddy says:

              norm is injecting his progeny (1 year old now?) with the experiment… cuz Stay Safe and Protection from the Vid. right norm? (norm won’t respond…)

            • not sure what UEP is Fred

              but i think it is a sort of fatalistic assessment—insofar as i or anyone else can judge.

              i base my thinking on human nature–not hoaxes or conspiracies.

              every species is genetically driven to further its own ends, so consumes and reproduces accordingly.

              that accepted—then everything else becomes window dressing.—nice houses, clothes–cars are all add-ons to our reproductive inclinations.
              ie–my kids are more likely to survive if they are well housed, clothed and fed….very simple concept.
              All their kids function in the same way–and so on.

              we are programmed to ensure their survival, and minimize risk to them.

              to that end we will consume until we are prevented from doing so.

              everybody agrees we must consume less—as long as it doesn’t apply to ‘me’–same with climate destruction.

          • lidiaseventeen
            lidiaseventeen says:

            Norm, you’re right that no one will be exempt, but I think you give too much weight to the purported “intelligence” of technocrats.

            You write, “It isn’t possible to have a few million ‘elite’ people living in a world run by robots.”

            *I* know that, and *you* know that, but do you really think (for example) Bill Gates knows that? If he knew it weren’t possible, what makes him spend his time dealing with all of these other assholes, running around doing TED-type talks, and investing in vaccines to accumulate money in order to do -what? He already has all the money anyone could ever want, so he must be driven by (let’s say it clearly) STUPIDITY of a certain kind… not to just fuck off to a version of Epstein’s island and enjoy his ill-gotten loot. As an example of his stupidity, what makes him spend tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars to avoid having to turn on a light switch?

            I’ve written in these pages about extremely-high-IQ people operating at a senior level who are absolutely convinced of [insert impossible tech fantasy here: Mars colonies, cryogenics, everyone living in high-rise skyscrapers being fed by balcony gardens…]. I lived for several years in the exclusive company of these sorts of individuals, so I know that entirely irrational beliefs are quite common among them. These beliefs override rationality because of the appeal to engineers of the possibility (even the slightest) of control. It’s tantalizing to them.

            I think Bezos (like Musk and Zuckerberg) is not so much an inspired entrepreneur as a front man employed to further already-established Deep State machinations (get everyone to buy online; develop control and surveillance resources the gov. itself can then turn around and purchase; get everyone to share all of their lives online, etc.). I think these Faux-ligarchs “wealth” may’ve always been a kind of Schrödinger’s wealth to begin with. Gates aside, in what universe do the “richest men on earth” head up companies that don’t actually ever seem to make a profit?

            • Fast Eddy says:

              not to just f789 off to a version of Epstein’s island and enjoy his ill-gotten loot.

              Ever heard of the Sultan of Brunei? He’s got Gates level dosh… and he lives on an island… he flies in beauty pageant winners and various other very very hot hot ladies on short term contracts … for his pleasure…

              Check it out https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1997-aug-26-me-26047-story.html

              About a month ago a couple stayed in our guest accom… they lived in Brunei and the wife worked at the Royal Family’s private hospital (nurse)… she said that all the stories are true — and she knows cuz when the girls arrived they were sent to the hospital for a wide range of tests … STDs… HIV etc etc etc…

              For the life of me – now that Bill is divorced… and Epstein is not in play to offer him The Precious … why he doesn’t buy an island in Asia … and set up his own Lolita Express… to bring in talent…

              Did I mention I once met a guy who was partner in property development firm in Asia .. expat .. heavy coke/pill user… apparently the big boss was also on the gear… he had a woman who he paid to haul his gear around for him (she takes the rap with the cops…) I imagine she also procured The Precious for him ….

              It can be done … quite easily. Maybe Bill just doesn’t know?

            • because Gates, Musk et al are on the same roller coaster as the rest of us, just on a different scale thats all

              you worry about earning the next $100, Musk worries about the next $1bn…he is driven to do it.

              they are no more or less rational than you or i

              when Bezos starting packing books in his garage back in 84–if you’d said he would become the world’s richest man as a a result, he would have said, quite rightly. you were nuts.
              Same applies to Gates and Jobs at the same time.

              Point being, that they were ideas at the right time and place. They grabbed their chance and won…millions didn’t.

              –a million other ideas were planted at the same time, and withered away to nothing.

              This is what proves there is no ‘deep state’…those million ideas were not part of the ‘deep state’.

              a few ideas made billions–so they must be part of ‘the deep state’.—there isnt one—other than to turn the planet itself into cash.
              which effectively means setting fire to it.

              Putting the cart before the horse just doesnt work.

              There is no deep state, merely chance.—But there are those among us who see things that are not there.

              Buying a lottery ticket functions in the same way–millions lose, one wins.
              No ‘deep state’ involved.

              Musk has $bns to spend on Mars rockets–but that clouds his reason, and makes him think he’s a rocket scientist.
              He isn’t. He buys people willing to tell him he is. Same with cars.

              Tesla has never made a profit–but millions think it will. I personally doubt it. As you say–Schrodingers ‘profit’.
              All Musk had was one lucky ticket on paypal. And that’s it—no ‘deep state’ involved.

              Ive defined these people before as ‘blinkered genius’. Hawking was another one. Focussed on a single entity.

              Insisting that humanity can solve its problems by finding another planet to go to.

              Bonkers….. yet there are people who believe it. Hawking said it–he’s clever, so it must be true.

              If you can get rid yourself of this deep state idea–you’ll do yourself a favour.

            • Kowalainen says:

              “You write, “It isn’t possible to have a few million ‘elite’ people living in a world run by robots.”

              How exactly would one find productive talent enough that could stitch this operation together?

              Egotism in combination with poor technical judgement makes this intractable.

              You see; the problem being is that the fish rots from the head down. The same egotistical fantasy that give rise to these hallucinations of utopia is what transpires down to society and shovels gravel into the machinery spitting out various forms of halfwitted and broken-from-the-get-go technical solutions and dullard careerists projecting veiled rapacious primatery until nothing is left but a hodgepodge of disparate parts that won’t stand the test of time (robustness, resiliency and failure mitigation) which would be absolutely necessary for achieving the “singularity”.

              Nope; ain’t gonna happen anytime soon and if it doesn’t – it never will.

              Expect another spin in the collapse-rebirth wheel of time until Mother Earth spits out a species that won’t allow itself to be compromised by unfair advantage.

              In the mean time:
              🪵 🪓 💧

              YOLO!
              MOAR!

              🤣👍👍

            • Artleads says:

              I believe Zuck makes money but is a brand of stoopid that’s harder to figure out than Gates.

        • Fast Eddy says:

          Maybe the Elders have been messing around with increasing doses of radiation so that they will be immune to the effects of the spent fuel ponds! You start with carrying a coin sized hunk of spend fuel in your pocket then increase it ever couple of months ….

          You sprinkle a little of it in powdered form into coffee… and so on

    • Alex says:

      0. Do not put an arsonist in charge of extinguishing a fire.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        A wise society would do what a society of birds or wolves or any other species of animal other than humans would do … not overshoot.

        Humans are MOREONS. The smarter they are … the bigger the MOREON

        There is no way anyone can argue against that – I’ll put that in front of the highest IQ MOREON and I guarantee you I will win that debate. Every single time.

    • Hubbs says:

      The ramifications of advancing beyond the human hunter-gatherer existence to farming, and from there, specialization and industrialization as a result of the one time “gift” of a huge fossil fuel battery extend further than we realize.

      Not only have FFs enabled an explosion in population from mechanized corporate mega farms, they have simultaneously accelerated the stripping of our natural resources in the process- from depletion of top soil, minerals, marine fisheries, fresh water etc., and “restocked” these with pollution and waste.

      So powerful is this co-evolution of “intelligence” and energy exploitation that they have overcome the depopulation of modern industrialized wars. The impact of war through diease and famine has also been mitigated by the advent of antibitoics and improved sanitation.

      A very few people have quietly been able to exploit this situation. Essentially, because they now have everything provided for them- food, energy, shelter, transportation, health care, clothing, etc. they are free to find ways to control the masses. These people do no productive value-added work but instead enagage in parasitic activities such as government, law, finance-the latter which now enabled by a fractional reserve fiat debt based system delivered through high speed internet, computers, and centralization of government. These non-productive extensions of our civilization and economy have expedited huge wealth transfers in a vicious feedback loop.

      I think the founding fathers instinctively, if not flat-out, knew that allowing non-productive people in full time governnment sewed the seeds for wealth and power concentration. Oliogarchy, fascism, whatever.

      To digress, I became acutely aware of our predicament about eleven years ago when I read James W, Rawles’ book Patriots, and then saw two videos posted by this ex Navy pilot who was also I suspect a closet “prepper” flying around in his trike in the NW Redoubt of the Idaho Palouse and Montana.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2X1C2iOQDc
      And his best video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GO2ibEoykW8

      • my take on it is that in every large group of people, 1 will be smarter/stronger than the rest.

        in prehistory, he dominated by physical force, took prime land, mated with the best females repeatedly.

        In our time, fossil fuels have allowed brawn to be replaced by brain, so now we have billionaires who are ‘non productive’, but who employ other to produce for them, and skim the surplus off the top.

        hence our society gets divided into classes, which all depend on surplus energy availabilty

        • Cromagnon says:

          And as the surplus goes away, reorganization into neo tribal groups will see the rise of “Comanche Culture” (read Empire of the Summer Moon) and the termination of the non productive or the meek.

          All those lawyers will make for good eating!

      • Fast Eddy says:

        Funny how the humans like to blame the ‘one off gift of fossil fuels’

        The fossil fuels were there before humans came on the scene… and none of the ‘stupid’ species tapped into them and paved over the Earth

  2. “Several major cities in Pakistan have become battlegrounds as supporters of ousted prime minister Imran Khan march toward Islamabad.

    “Police resorted to firing tear gas and baton charges on Wednesday in the northern state of Punjab, the country’s largest province and a stronghold of the ruling Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N), after protesters tried to forcefully remove barricades to stop them from moving towards the capital.”

    https://www.independent.co.uk/asia/south-asia/pakistan-imran-khan-march-islamabad-b2086855.html

    • “Investors start to worry as Pakistan’s IMF bailout not final yet.

      “Investors are getting nervous. Without a bailout from the International Monetary Fund, Pakistan may default for the second time in its history. As talks with the IMF conclude Wednesday in Doha, officials acknowledge that winning a loan from the multilateral lender might involve trade-offs, including the politically tough decision of raising fuel prices.”

      https://www.aljazeera.com/economy/2022/5/25/investors-start-to-worry-as-imf-bailout-not-firmed-up-yet

      • “Turkey’s default insurance costs jump to highest since global financial crisis.

        “The cost of insuring Turkey’s debt against default shot to its highest since the 2008 global financial crisis on Tuesday as the country veered towards what looked like another serious bout of financial trouble.”

        https://www.nasdaq.com/articles/turkeys-default-insurance-costs-jump-to-highest-since-global-financial-crisis

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        More debt doesn’t exactly fix a problem with inadequate world energy resources.

  3. “Harsh winter may compel Europe to ration gas, warns International Energy Agency…

    “”I’m afraid that I cannot exclude the risk this winter that we are facing a rationing of gas,” Mr Birol said during an interview at the World Economic Forum, the annual gathering of global business leaders in Davos, Switzerland. “I’m advising several European governments to prepare a contingency plan.””

    https://www.irishtimes.com/business/energy-and-resources/harsh-winter-may-compel-europe-to-ration-gas-warns-international-energy-agency-1.4887331

    • “Europe’s primary aluminium smelters are continuing to curtail production in the face of soaring energy costs.

      “The region’s output of the light metal has fallen by an annualised 550,000 tonnes over the last year with the slide still accelerating. Aluminium smelting is an energy-intensive business and Europe’s smelters were struggling with elevated power pricing even before Russia launched what it calls a “special military operation” in Ukraine.”

      https://www.reuters.com/markets/commodities/europes-aluminium-output-slides-energy-crunch-bites-2022-05-24/

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        It is hard to sell aluminum made with high priced electricity at a high enough price to make a profit, I expect. Aluminum can only be made where electricity is very cheap to produce, as in Iceland.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      This is an article about Europe’s natural gas. One thing it says is,

      “”Europe is paying for its overdependence on Russian energy,” Mr Birol said.”

      This sounds like a better excuse than, “We are at the end of the line.”

      The article ends,

      “The best and perhaps only way to preserve our civilization is to defeat Putin as soon as possible. That’s the bottom line.” – New York Times/Reuters

      That won’t help, I am afraid. But it makes a good story.

      • It does. The conflict and its attendant geopolitical discord look pretty intractable to me.

        The invasion was not the swift, expertly executed blitzkrieg hinted at by the annexation of Crimea in 2014. Russia seems in the ascendancy in the Donbass but capturing territory is often the easy part.

        The bitterness and mistrust between Russia and the West are entrenched now and will fester until IC fails, I suspect.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        It’s all about creating the perception that this is a temporary problem — and will be resolved by defeating the evil Putin.

        PR Team should be stickers of the face of Putin on every pump …

  4. “China’s Economic Slump Shows No Signs of Bottoming Out in May…

    “China’s economy remained deep in a slump in May as lockdowns continued to weigh on activity, and as the threat of omicron and expanded restrictions dampened sentiment… Bloomberg’s aggregate index of eight early indicators for this month… stayed below the mark that separates improving from deteriorating conditions for a second straight month.”

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-26/china-s-economic-slump-shows-no-signs-of-bottoming-out-in-may

    • “100,000 Chinese officials attend emergency meeting to revive Covid-hit economy.

      “China’s cabinet held an emergency meeting with more than 100,000 participants on Wednesday, according to state media, as top leaders urged new measures to stabilize an economy battered by the country’s stringent Covid-19 restrictions.”

      https://edition.cnn.com/2022/05/26/business/china-state-council-economic-meeting-intl-hnk/index.html

      • “China Protesters Demand Back Billions Invested in Suspected Scam…

        “Hundreds of people took to the streets of the largest city in China’s Henan province this week, calling on authorities to ensure the return of tens of billions of yuan invested in what could be one of the nation’s largest financial scams.”

        https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-05-25/china-protesters-demand-back-billions-invested-in-suspected-scam

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        This is a good article. I noticed this paragraph:

        The premier has become increasingly vocal about the economic downturn in recent weeks, calling the situation “complex and grave” earlier in May — but Wednesday’s comments may paint the grimmest picture yet.

        If the situation is this bad, why isn’t more being done. The 33 approaches being unveiled didn’t look like they would fix the situation.

        • if China ‘deliberately unleashed the virus”—one would think they’d have some kind of failsafe on hand to protect their own country from it

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      The economy of China isn’t doing well in May, if auto and home sales are still down:

      Declines in home and car sales continued, though at slower paces than last month. That’s despite the government relaxing rules and cutting taxes for car purchases. To combat the housing slump, the People’s Bank of China this month cut the interest rate for new mortgages, banks lowered their key lending rate for home loans and the State Council asked local governments to support reasonable housing demand.

  5. “Rising Rates Are Battering Mortgage Lenders [US].

    “Mortgage lenders are scrambling to survive a sharp drop-off in the number of homeowners refinancing their loans, with demand drying up as interest rates rise… the drop-off in refinancing activity is a giant blow because refinancings made up the bulk of U.S. mortgage originations throughout the pandemic.”

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/rising-rates-are-battering-mortgage-lenders-11653471002

    • “ECB warns a house price correction is looming as interest rates rise…

      “A reversal in the region’s housing markets was one of the main risks identified by the ECB’s twice-yearly financial stability review(opens a new window), which also warned that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine meant more companies were likely to default due to lower growth, higher inflation and rising borrowing costs.”

      https://www.ft.com/content/4ca7ff91-35bc-428e-8690-e3617afab47c

      • “UK homeowners are spending more to live in their house than at any point in the last 15 years, with mortgage repayments equalling almost 33 per cent of monthly income.

        “The cost of living crisis and increase in interest rates has put renewed pressure on property-owners, with house prices soaring and the cost of repayments nearing the 2008 financial crash levels.”

        https://www.cityam.com/average-mortgage-repayments-approaching-33-per-cent-of-monthly-income-akin-to-2008-financial-crash-levels/

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        A person would think that home prices would have to fall, at some point.

  6. “Central banks hiking everywhere…

    “Being late as a central bank means raising rates more aggressively and higher than would otherwise have needed to be the case. Often just as as the nation is entering a slow-down created by the runaway inflation the bank allowed in the first place.”

    https://www.fxstreet.com/analysis/central-banks-hiking-everywhere-202205260456

    • “Davos elites fear ‘Volcker Moment’ as central banks draw their swords… Experts warn the Fed is ready to raise rates as high as 5pc – even if it results in a recession…

      “There are mounting worries that the Fed will ultimately be forced to dish out the ‘Volcker’ medicine of the late 1970s. It has already begun to engineer a deliberate and (hopefully) controlled crash in equity and asset prices.”

      https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2022/05/25/davos-elites-fear-volcker-moment-central-banks-draw-swords/

      • ivanislav says:

        This is nonsense jabbering. They CANNOT raise rates to 5%, our debts are too high. They have to devalue the dollar. They will pretend they aren’t, so that the currency doesn’t hyperinflate on account of everyone running for the exit at once.

        • I agree. UK hedge fund manager, Crispin Odey said recently, “Everybody knows that the West is bankrupt somewhere around interest rates of 3%.” Central banks need to talk tough though.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Do as central banks other places are doing.

  7. “The head of the World Bank has warned that Russia’s invasion of Ukraine could cause a global recession as the price of food, energy and fertiliser jump.

    “David Malpass told a US business event on Wednesday that it is difficult to “see how we avoid a recession”. He also said a series of coronavirus lockdowns in China are adding to concerns about a slowdown.

    “His comments are the latest warning over the rising risk that the world economy may be set to contract.”

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-61575387

    • “Another Month Closer To Global Recession…

      “The whole range of global data indicates exactly what markets have been pricing the entire year, since the beginning of Euro$ #5. The more time passes, the more most everything continues in this – not the inflationary – direction. That direction is firmly toward recession…”

      https://seekingalpha.com/article/4514299-another-month-closer-global-recession

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Agreed! The economy seems to be headed for recession.

    • “[Bellwether] Copper drops for the third consecutive day as recession fears escalate…

      “Copper remains on the back foot around weekly low, prints three-day downtrend. China’s covid conditions, geopolitical headlines raise concerns over global economic downturn.”

      https://www.fxstreet.com/news/copper-drops-for-the-third-consecutive-day-as-recession-fears-escalate-202205260530

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Actually, the world was already headed for recession, before Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

  8. drb753
    drb753 says:

    Apologies if this has been posted in the past, I am still a relative newbie. But no one explains how extraction businesses (mining and drilling) have increasing energy requirements (reducing energy available to the rest of the economy), like Simon Michaux does. He has two stacks of slides on Youtube from 2020 and 2021, each about 15 minutes. He also properly pegs the ERoEI for arctic fields, the last temporary hope, in one presentation. You look at that slide and the current plan by the russian government becomes crystal clear.

    • ivanislav says:

      This one? His main point is that ore quality is decreasing, which increases the energy requirements of extraction, against a backdrop of decreasing energy availability/EROEI.
      https://youtu.be/JRGVqBScBRE

      He didn’t discuss the arctic directly in either one, I don’t believe, but the implications for the arctic as a last hurrah are clear.

      I’ll be checking out more of Simon Michaux’s content in the future.

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Simon does a good job. I have corresponded with him a fair amount.

        • ivanislav says:

          He gives you a shout-out at the end of this interview – “her intellect is amazing”:
          https://youtu.be/MskRocubx08

          • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
            Gail Tverberg says:

            Thanks for pointing this out. Nice of him. I have never met Simon Michaux in person, but I have looked over drafts of reports he has written and given him some ideas.

  9. Student says:

    (El Mundo)

    A scandal of 2.200 false Covid ‘vaccinations’ has been revealed by Police in Spain.
    The false ‘vaccinations’ produced false Covid passports.
    Very important people are among these fake passports.
    A very interesting example of the people within the group is the fake Covid vaccination of the President of a Big Pharma Company.

    https://www.elmundo.es/madrid/2022/05/25/628df993e4d4d8b1038b456e.html

  10. Fast Eddy says:

    I dedicate this to norm …norm have you had your 5th yet?

    Sweden: 5th COVID-19 shot to people over 65, pregnant women

    “As of Sept. 1, Sweden recommends that another booster shot is given to people aged 65 and older and people over 18 in the risk groups. The Swedish Public Health Agency said the latter includes pregnant women, people with weakened immune systems and people with heart and lung disease.”

    https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/sweden-5th-covid-19-shot-people-65-pregnant-84929370

    • Tsubion says:

      Always specifically targetting the “risk groups” and pregnant women. Interesting. And doctors still recommend mask wearing for “risk groups.”

      This is what I see in my local community. The most vulnerable (operated, previous known conditions) are the ones most masked and jabbed, still walking and driving around on their own fully masked because someone tells them these particles are everywhere at all times. Even with bright sunshine which is the best disenfectant and on windy days!

      It’s quite astonishing what they have done to these poor people in such a short space of time. If tv didn’t exist they would have carried on with their lives and not noticed a single thing.

      The most vulnerable are the ones that need more oxygen in the blood than anyone else. Oxygenation is key to maintaining proper health. And yet these ignorant doctors still recommend exactly the opposite because they are ordered to by the medical establishment.

      If this isn’t a form of eugenics then I don’t know what is.

    • ” people over 65, pregnant women”

      Makes sense, if your agenda is to concentrate on those who require a large proportion of the planet’s / community’s resources but don’t give a lot back since they are retired, and minimise the number of new mouths to feed / look after.

      “people with weakened immune systems ” – that will be most of the population won’t it? Although most of them might not know it yet.

    • Lastcall says:

      Handmaidens Tale; reduced population to eunuchs

  11. Fast Eddy says:

    Here we go again

    Fox Business on the Escalating Feud Between Elon Musk and Bill Gates

    https://rumble.com/v162e1l-fox-business-on-the-escalating-feud-between-elon-musk-and-bill-gates.html

    They are probably sucking the blood out of a 12 yr old girl that they raped and then strangled …. there is no feud

  12. Fast Eddy says:

    Another BS story meant to make you think Elon is on your side

    Bill Gates Poured Millions into Dark Money Fund Attacking Elon Musk

    “Research exclusively shared with Breitbart News identifies hundreds of millions of dollars flowing from Bill Gates’ foundation to 11 of the 26 organizations that signed an open letter last month (https://www.influencewatch.org/non-profit/neo-philanthropy-formerly-public-interest-projects/) urging Twitter advertisers to boycott the company if Elon Musk restores free speech on the platform.”

    https://www.breitbart.com/tech/2022/05/23/exclusive-bill-gates-poured-millions-into-dark-money-fund-attacking-elon-musk/

  13. Fast Eddy says:

    Two people have plead guilty to ballot harvesting in Arizona.

    One is a Democrat politician who plead guilty to CONSPIRACY charges and is giving up the names of her accomplices.

    https://truthsocial.com/@Kanekoa/posts/108364786084792145

    norm?

  14. Fast Eddy says:

    And they’d tell us this? BTW we are all linked already all the time – it’s called a mobile phone

    “As part of this plan, the WHO has contracted Deutsche Telekom to develop a global vaxx passport system, with plans to link every person on the planet to a QR code digital ID.”

    https://brownstone.org/articles/the-who-treaty-is-tied-to-a-global-digital-passport-and-id-system/

  15. Fast Eddy says:

    Athletes Falling, Comedians Falling: The Health Agencies Tell You Nothing About Sudden Fainting

    Dr. Naomi Wolf: “People are falling so hard … and no one knows. What is this? Well, Pfizer knew, BioNTech knew, the SEC knew, but if you compare the side effects that Pfizer and BioNTech KNEW ABOUT, massive at scale on their internal documents versus the ones on the CDC website yesterday or what your doctors will disclose to you, based on CDC guidance or FDA guidance. It’s, ‘You might have a headache. You might have chills. You might have fatigue.’ None of these serious side effects are disclosed.”

    @VigilantFox | Rumble (https://rumble.com/v161y1r-athletes-falling-comedians-falling-the-health-agencies-tell-you-nothing-abo.html) | Full Video (https://www.redvoicemedia.com/video/2022/05/the-fda-knew-the-jab-was-dangerous-and-a-failure-the-pfizer-documents-with-dr-naomi-wolf-video-interview/)

  16. Fast Eddy says:

    This 1970s TV documentary about climate change is instructive.

    I looked up one of the glaciologists. He’s still at it.
    When the TV program was made, he was saying an ice age was overdue & on its way.

    Now he’s collecting grants to study how global warming affects the same Arctic. Spooky eh?

    Now he’s collecting grants to study how global warming affects the same Arctic. Spooky eh?

    Now he’s collecting grants to study how global warming affects the same Arctic. Spooky eh?

    Now he’s collecting grants to study how global warming affects the same Arctic. Spooky eh?

    Now he’s collecting grants to study how global warming affects the same Arctic. Spooky eh?

    Now he’s collecting grants to study how global warming affects the same Arctic. Spooky eh?

    Separately, at around 13min, an ocean floor core expert tells us confidently that there have been 9 ice ages in the last 700,000 years & the next is imminent.

    Funny how an independent expert & confident viewpoint can do a 180 if enough money is applied to the “problem”.

    https://youtu.be/7tAYXQPWdC0

  17. Lastcall says:

    Someone linked to a 2000 White House meeting on Complementary Alternative Medicines
    .
    A small excerpt or 2 shows why these must be suppressed.
    They work they are cheap…..bury them deep!

    ‘The most complete data on cost effectiveness comes
    from the French Government report on 1991 Social Security
    statistics which demonstrated significantly reduced costs
    using homeopathic versus conventional medical care.
    The total cost of care in the office setting for a
    physician utilizing homeopathy was approximately one-half of
    the total cost of care provided by conventional primary care
    physicians even when factoring in the cost of fewer patients
    seen per homeopathic physician, the overall cost per patient
    under homeopathic care was 15 percent less, and savings
    increased the longer a physician had been using homeopathy.
    Additionally, in a further review of the data, the
    number of paid sick leave days by patients under the care of
    homeopathic physicians was three and a half times less than
    patients under the care of conventional practitioners, and
    while homeopathic prescriptions, which are reimbursable in
    the French health care system, represented 5 percent of all
    medicines prescribed, they represented only 1.2 percent of
    all drug reimbursements due to their lower costs per
    prescription.

    For more serious acute conditions, homeopathy may
    provide complete care in the hands of the primary care
    provider. Indeed, in the flu pandemic of 1918, where over
    half a million Americans succumbed and the average mortality
    was 30 percent, less than 1 percent of patients treated
    homeopathically were lost, with some homeopathic physicians
    reporting treatment of thousands of cases.
    In the realm of obstetrics, I have used homeopathy
    to treat nausea and vomiting, to arrest preterm labor, to
    convert breech presentations, to facilitate labor, thereby
    avoiding numerous hospitalizations, procedures, and
    intensive care days.
    The framework goes on through the entire continuum
    of care.’

    https://govinfo.library.unt.edu/whccamp/meetings/transcript_12_4_00_morning.html#homeopathy

    • Tsubion says:

      Why the focus on Homeopathy? There are hundreds of other alternative systems that could genuinely compete with and reduce the need for costly allopathothic so called medicine. Complete systems of complementary natural medicine such as Ayur Veda add a deep understanding of the causes of disease. Many doctors are choosing this as a specialisation now.

      Homeopathy is an easy target for the allopathic dictatorship because of its unprovable claims and its dependence on using substances at microscopic levels reduced to almost nothing to treat advanced disease. A deeper understanding of the causes of dis-ease are what’s needed. Prevention, early detection of imbalance, natural, gentle, whole system balancing treatments can do away with most barbaric, toxic, allopathic insanity.

      Oh… and virology is not science. It is pseudoscience and needs to be completely and utterly revamped as laid out by German New Medicine.

      I repeat… Viruses have never been properly isolated or purified. Virologists pick images from micrographs and make unsubstantiated claims. These particles are mostly cell debris of which there are millions to choose from. They do not cause disease. They are inert proteins. They show up at the site of disease because cells break down when disease happens. The virologists blame these cell debris particles because their industry demands it.

      The cause of disease is toxicity and deficiencies. Deficiencies will rise as starvation kicks in around the world. Horrible visible symptoms will emerge because of malnutrition and denutrition. Water supplies will become contaminated with toxins causing even more nasty looking disease.

      Virologists will say all of these symptoms are caused by different virus particles floating around and will prescribe mass vaxxination campaigns for the whole world. And of course the vaxxines themselves will increase the mortality rates and general level of visible disease.

      Round and round it goes.

      The blind leading the blind.

      • Lastcall says:

        The quote on Homeopathy was used because it was a nice succinct passage and I have had great success myself.
        By the way; Homeopathy is not about ‘substances at microscopic levels’, its about energies/vibrations etc.
        Enjoy your ‘complete system’; I think the results from my experience and the French health system may negate your ‘unprovable claims’. Are you referring to ‘The Science’ when you demand proof?
        So sad.

        • Tsubion says:

          Making rash judgements about people you have never met is what is so sad.

          I am as far removed from “Trusting the Science” as you can get.

          There is nothing wrong with the concept of a comprehensive system of medicine. One that is inclusive of all known evidence-based approaches to health. Even some allopathic treatments are valid especially as a last resort. Nothing is off the table.

          Energy? Vibration? Everything consists of this at a fundamental level. Nothing wrong with that as the basis for healing strategies. Vibration therapy has been used for thousands of years. Magnetic therapy is being used even now. And much of Ayur Veda is based on the same principles.

          I guess the claim is that homeopthy preprations balance the system at a deep level.

          And the proof is? Someone gets better over time. Or someone gets worse. Placebo? I fail to see how this can be measured accurately. But I don’t deny that it may be having some effect.

          Fasting also repairs nerve damage.

          I predict a lot of involuntary nerve damage repair in the coming years.

      • Kowalainen says:

        The usual “silver bullet” “spoonful of xyz every morning” ‘holistic’ BS.

        I say: Eat your plant based food and turn the cranks until it hurts and then some.

        Problem being is the self entitled rapacious primate princesses of IC which can’t accept mild self inflicted discomfort.

        Questions? No?
        Good!

        Now turn ‘em cranks princess!
        🚴💨💨💨

        👍

        • drb753
          drb753 says:

          Oh my god I am meat based. I will now get sick any day, even though I have not been sick in years. I used to before..

    • Remember attending a Permaculture gathering some decades ago and one of the speakers was non other than Dr James Duke…he pointed out that these remedies of herbs were frowned upon by Pharmaceutical Industry because they could not profit by them?
      JAMES A. DUKE, PHD, held several posts in his more than three decades with the US Department of Agriculture, including chief of the Medicinal Plant Resources Laboratory. He is the author of numerous scholarly and popular books, including the bestseller The Green Pharmacy, and is on the board of advisors for Prevention. He resides in Fulton, Maryland.

      Suppose planting a herbal plot might be a good idea

  18. Fast Eddy says:

    The FOIA documents show five separate dog experiments are planned — including tests on 6-month-old puppies. Some dogs could be force-fed large doses of the drug for months.

    #TheDefender

    https://childrenshealthdefense.org/defender/faucis-niaid-taxpayer-funds-drug-experiments-puppies/

    Children’s Health Defense (https://childrenshealthdefense.org/defender/faucis-niaid-taxpayer-funds-drug-experiments-puppies/)
    Fauci’s NIAID Approved $1.8 Million in Taxpayer Funds for Drug Experiments on Puppies
    A division of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) run by Dr. Anthony Fauci allocated $1,836,453 in taxpayer dollars to test an experimental hay fever drug on dogs, rats and mice, according to documents released Monday by the White Coat Waste Project.

  19. Fast Eddy says:

    So the supply chains are beyond the point of no return … how does this equate with control?

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=d3WUv5SV5Hg

    I wonder what Robert Kadlec is up to these days?

    Now, I’m not a conspiracy theorist (despite my generously written Wikipedia entry…I’d never had such a thing unless some presumed kindly fans created it for me) BUT….

    I mean, come off it. If you were to show this post to someone who’d not been paying attention, shouldn’t they go white? It’s so unequivocally planned, which removes the objection I hear often “it’s too complicated to have planned this” & “it would leak. You can’t plan something like this & it not leak!”

    Well, it didn’t leak, did it? In fact, it didn’t leak, twice. Covid19 then Monkeypox. So strike those objections. THEY’VE BEEN PLANNING THESE “OUTBREAKS” FOR DECADES (see Paul Schreyer documentary).

    Belgium has just announced mandatory quarantine for those testing positive for Monkeypox.

    You can see where this could go, if the perpetrators intend it to.

    At very least, they’re engaged in what has been called a “totalitarian shuffle”, where we’re repeatedly exposed to “problem – reaction – solution”, whereby they create a frightening situation, amplify it through mass media, then impose their solution, another click along the road to a permanent bio security state.

    IF WE COMPLY WITH THIS OBVIOUS NONSENSE, THE END-GAME IS ALL TOO CLEAR. The lifting of c19-related restrictions will be copy/pasted to Monkeypox related restrictions, and sooner rather than later, massed vaccination will begin.

    Meanwhile & entirely independently, food shortages are being engineered, through a long list of absurd events. Livestock is being slaughtered because they release methane, allegedly damaging the climate. Millions of chickens are culled because of a single bird flu “case” (by a PCR test) & the staff fired. Chicken & egg shortages are beginning. Fish farms are closing due to alleged bacterial outbreaks. Food processing plants are mysteriously catching fire. Conflict in Eastern Europe has already disrupted the fertiliser supply chains everywhere, so crops are either planted without this crucial input or not planted at all.

    THERE IS NO POSSIBLE WAY TO FIX THE SHORTAGES ALREADY BURNED INTO THE TIMELINE. Imagine what’s going to happen when people finally realise that the shortages in the shops aren’t going to be resolved & it’s only going to get worse? None of us in the rich West have given a thought to the possibility that there are insufficient calories to prevent mass starvation & death on a biblical scale.

    This is the real story, not Monkeypox or any other alleged pandemic.

    Yet additionally, the same perpetrators are engaged in wanton destruction of the wider economy & especially the sovereign currencies of the world. Everything is to be destroyed, including savings, investments & private property rights. They’re already preparing their Great Reset, where Year Zero has all of us totally dependent upon the state & central banks in order to obtain food rations. Mandatory digital ID is the logical step to enable equitable distribution of limited supplies of food & other goods.

    So, I implore you to do your own research & persuade as many people around you who are not already clued up that a small, self-appointee elite group are taking down humanity, deleting freedoms are forcing dangerous treatments on them as a requirement to be able to live & move around.

    If we don’t say NO TO ALL THIS CONTROL, early on, before it has a chance to create its own unstoppable momentum, I see no way to avoid being funneled exactly as these monsters have planned.

    I don’t know what the best responses are. Forgive me. I missed that part of my education. But some resourceful people do know the likely, most-effective responses. I’m looking out keenly for a sign that such people exist anywhere.

    Best wishes
    Mike Yeadon

  20. Fast Eddy says:

    Valentina Zharkova is probably the leading solar physicist in the world.

    She explained, using visuals, why the sun controls climate change on Earth.

    Anybody who believes that humans are more powerful than the sun, has been watching too many sci-fi films, and buying into too much propaganda.

    Humans do NOT make Earth warmer or cooler.

    Watch her presentation here (https://odysee.com/@jermwarfare:2/valentina-zharkova:d?r=BDjTAtq4WJnuTurz5kqJidEt2WsNSwwj).

  21. Fast Eddy says:

    https://youtu.be/7tAYXQPWdC0

    YouTube (https://youtu.be/7tAYXQPWdC0)

    Ice Age 1978 Leonard Nimoy
    Climate Change according to scientists in 1978 was a far cry from what you hear from scientists today.

  22. Fast Eddy says:

    The Great Global Warming Swindle – Full Documentary HD
    1,164,321 views Aug 19, 2018 The Great Global Warming Swindle caused controversy in the UK when it premiered March 8, 2007 on British Channel 4..

    https://youtu.be/oYhCQv5tNsQ?t=3420

  23. Fast Eddy says:

    Wow – 2-3% having serious adverse reactions – top ICU specialist https://t.me/DowdEdward/464

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Doesn’t sound good!

  24. US natural gas $9.02 highest since 2008!

    no cheap gas for Europe, even if we have some to spare.

    (stolen election = Biden demoncrats = Ukraine war which was not going to happen with Trump = Normman’s children and grandkids might be freezing in the dark this coming winter. Really? There are such things as consequences? Who knew?)

    (Biden demoncrats = I might be freezing in the dark this winter, and I don’t even use natural gas.)

    but tonight it’s semi quasi bAU, baby.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      In May, no less. Normally, high gas prices occur at seasonal peaks. Either the peak of heat in the summer, or in the winter when too much infrastructure is frozen, and both electricity and gas for home heating need all that is available through pipelines and from storage.

    • CTG says:

      davidinamillionyears… “quasi BAU”…. haha.. a change from full BAU? soon, it will be over

      • yes IC is hanging by a thread.

        semi quasi little “b” bAU is soon to be thrown into the dustbin of history.

        maybe even this year.

        if not, then certainly by next year.

        or at least by 2030.

        maybe we all should just give up?

        or start prepping! (sorry for that weak joke.)

        • nikoB says:

          This is very bad. If you david are now bAU with a little baby b instead of BAU tonight Baby things are worse than I thought.
          They might even be BAD.

          Stay safe all.

          • perhaps I am a human leading indicator.

            or a wingless canary in a coal mine.

            keep an eye out for my usage of 2030.

            lately I’ve been tempted to use 2025.

            the Endgame is here.

            the End is near.

            it is what it is, tonight, baby.

            • CTG says:

              davidinamillionyears…. I like your optimism but unfortunately, I was born with a disability. A severe disability – I cannot unlearn what I learn and I cannot unsee or unhear what I have heard. I cannot lie to myself that I have many years to go

              Good for you !!

              Have a great bAU

            • postkey
              postkey says:

              “59:35 now i see china with not just a demographic failure but a failure of
              59:40 leadership a failure to policy an agricultural failure and an energy failure all at the same time it is
              59:47 entirely possible that this is the last year of the people of the people’s republic“ ?

    • Wolf takes a look at natural gas:

      https://wolfstreet.com/2022/05/25/us-natural-gas-futures-spiked-to-highest-since-2008-tripled-in-a-year-why-we-kissed-that-dirt-cheap-natural-gas-goodbye/

      “As US export capacity continues to grow, global demand for US LNG is competing to an ever-larger extent with demand in the US, which intensifies the link between global LNG prices and US natural gas prices.

      And those dirt-cheap prices of natural gas of 2009 through mid-2021 that consumers, power generators, and industrial companies benefited from, and that bankrupted many oil & gas producers that specialized in fracking for natural gas, and that bankrupted coal miners, is now a thing of the past. Much higher prices, in line with pricing globally, are what the US has to deal with now.”

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        The US definitely has a natural gas problem. It cannot afford to export as much as it is trying to export without prices rising a lot.

    • Alex says:

      Let’s see what the futures bring.

      https://www.zerohedge.com/commodities/us-natural-gas-prices-hit-2008-highs-summer-tightness

      “It isn’t about winter demand outlooks – it’s about summer refill outlooks.”

      “July futures trade at a premium over next February futures, the first time in nearly two decades.”

      “US NatGas futures are now trading at a premium to Day-Ahead EU NatGas prices for the first time in more than one year.”

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Good points. Too much growth in exports, and US production is not ramping up much.

  25. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    At WEF 2022, Helen E. Clark is aware of dwindling public support for COVID restrictions.

    Her solution: full international control.

    Countries must comply with WHO edicts or lose access to the World Bank or face WTO sanctions.
    https://twitter.com/MythinformedMKE/status/1529584548954222593

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      World Economic Forum folks would try anything to get countries to go along with WHO edicts, no matter how ridiculous.

    • Rodster says:

      Dr. Michael Yeadon in this interview basically said that’s the endgame, which is total control. David Icke who’s been labelled a nutjob for quite some time has also said the Covid-scam was always about authoritarian control over the world’s population.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        The end game is total control?

        Mike believes they want to enslave us…. why would they want to do that?

        They already pretty much enslave us — so they will stop paying us – we’ll own nothing — does he envision a Global Soviet?

        We already know how that story ends — nobody wants to do f789all because they are not rewarded… nobody starts businesses… nobody shows initiative… why bother — just relax and enjoy nothing…

        The system they had before 2020 was awesome… The Rich were getting Richer!!! They paid minimal if any taxes… they flew around in private jets….

        Why would they want to enslave everyone – surely that just makes everyone poorer – including the billionaires….

        Mike is making no sense…

        The problem is – he cannot accept that the oil is running out — we also know how that story ends..

        At least if you believe the control story — it means you remain alive and can fight even though the odds are slim…. throughout history totalitarian regimes have been toppled… this fight gives meaning to Mike’s life….

        To accept this is all about oil (UEP) … means to acknowledge that this is the end of the road for humans. Mike falls into despair if he accepts that.

        • Tsubion says:

          You have to round up the animals in the pen before you put them down.

          You have to entice them with some feed or nibble at their ankles. Whatever gets the herd moving.

          With human animals you tell them they’re getting a UBI and endless digital entertainment.

          The elite are attempting to lock the entire population in an open air digital ID prison. Obviously, they will fail.

          Life and nature is simply too chaotic. No one really knows what will happen next.

          • Fast Eddy says:

            Putting them down collapses BAU = the Elders die.

            They were already 100% controlled… it’s called The Tee Vee… it’s called sporting leagues on the Tee Vee… and reality Tee Vee… and the MSM ‘news’… it’s call propaganda round the clock… it’s called Holleeewoood…. it’s called Justin and kim and Paris…

            It’s called – a salary. It’s called – the lottery … it’s called The Education System… (the indoctrination system)…. It’s called democracy where one flunky is replaced by another both having no power but creating the perception that WE control the system….

            We are totally controlled already. 100% under the boot. But it’s been a pretty nice boot to date… for those of us in the first world at least… soft expensive leather.. smells new and fresh…

            We are quite happy to be controlled….even though most people would reject the thesis.

            Consider that most people actually believe the politicians run their country… they don’t… the Elders are the board… the politicians and Deep State dance to their tune…. nah they don’t micromanage but the business model is made clear – you follow it and do not make us have to put you back in line … and you everyone will be happy…

            Most people reject that thesis… See how easily they are controlled… See how completely they are controlled?

            They are STOOOPID MOREONS… no need to chip them hahahaha… other than to find the dummmb f789s if they get lost

  26. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    MonkeyPox: The Cover-Up For VAIDS, Citizen Researchers Expose Government Plot To Kill En Masse
    https://rumble.com/v163j0l-monkeypox-the-cover-up-for-vaids-citizen-researchers-expose-government-plot.html

    Ask Dr. Jane: The Immune Compromised, Vaxxed Blood, And MonkeyPox
    https://rumble.com/v163i6l-featured-segment-ask-dr.-jane-the-immune-compromised-vaxxed-blood-and-monke.html

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      This is all too awful for most people to believe.

  27. Fast Eddy says:

    Funny that pregnant women were excluded from the clinical trials — yet it is recommended at all levels that pregnant women get injected…

    As McCullough points out – we NEVER given pregnant women any vaccine or drug unless it has been rigorously tested over a long time.

    More support for UEP – who cares if you wreck the women and the child — everyone will soon be dead

  28. Fast Eddy says:

    Vaccinated Women
    Fertility signals are coming through.

    The topic of pregnant and nursing moms getting vaccinated under encouragement and coercion is painful. It’s painful to research, painful to write about, and painful to learn how carelessly the most precious among us are being treated. The very essence of life and nature live within pregnant and nursing mothers. Reflecting on how little regard was paid to that life is upsetting, and everything I have to report in this post is done so with a heavy heart and a hope that we’ll get through this with a renewed sense of personal autonomy when it comes to medical decisions.

    https://etana.substack.com/p/vaccinated-women

    • MM says:

      So Fast:
      Is the UEP painful or is it pure fun?

      • the CEP (WOCTOAT WOrst Conspearasea Theeeeory Of All Time) was more fun due to its laughabble Compassion element.

        the UEP (candidate for SWOCTOAT Second WOrst Conspearasea Theeeeeory Of All Time) who knows?

        • Tsubion says:

          Oh dear… I’m not up to date on the protocol acronyms.

          CEP was Compassionate Extinction Protocol

          When did that become UEP? And what’s the U?

          I agree with you David that there is absolutely no evidence of compassion among the elite cartels. And therefore no reason for them to be compassionate when attempting to cull the herd or ensalve them even further.

          The only reason for the softly softly approach and the very successful application of bread and circuses is to not awaken the sleeping giant.

          One day soon it will awaken though. And all hell will break loose. Thye simply cannot control what’s coming. They thought they could, but it’s over for them.

          • Ultimate Extinction Plan.

            even the author of the CEP finally realized how abbbsurd was the Compassionate part.

            …….

            yes, soon.

            the Elites cannot control chaos.

            • Fast Eddy says:

              It’s still compassionate… the Elders and their minions could retired to a quiet room and down a handful of Fentanyl… and leave the 8B to rip faces off.

              They really do not have to go through this complicated extermination plan… it’s rather time consuming …

          • Fast Eddy says:

            a few updates https://www.headsupster.com/forumthread?shortId=220

            I have not yet determined if the injections were about damaging the immune system and if Monkey Pox will effectively be a juiced up virus introduced to replace Devil Covid as the Kill Mechanism.

            Potentially Monkey Pox is just another way to create fear and force more injections into a wavering population as the quest for Devil Covid proves illusive.

  29. Fast Eddy says:

    SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination Can Elicit a CD8 T-cell Dominant Hepatitis

    “COVID19 vaccination can elicit a distinct T cell-dominant immune-mediated hepatitis with a unique pathomechanism associated with vaccination induced antigen-specific tissue-resident immunity requiring systemic immunosuppression.”

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35461912/

    7 studies that help explain why the vaccinated are getting more infected; especially the 2nd by Yahi et al; shows the non-neutralizing Abs bind to the virus spike, and enhances infectiousness of virus

    https://palexander.substack.com/p/7-studies-that-help-explain-why-the

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Lay Summary of the study from the first link:

      Lay summary: Liver inflammation is observed during SARS-CoV-2 infection but can also occur in some individuals after vaccination and shares some typical features with autoimmune liver disease. In this report, we show that highly activated T cells accumulate and are evenly distributed in the different areas of the liver in a patient with liver inflammation following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Moreover, within the population of these liver-infiltrating T cells, we observed an enrichment of T cells that are reactive to SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that these vaccine-induced cells can contribute to liver inflammation in this context.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        FE Summary – with these covid injections so many bad things can happen + they don’t protect you from getting covid and it turns out that although you get short lived protection from severe illnesss, over time it’s the injected who are ending up in hospital…

        So if you puts this on a scale… only a f789ing re tar ded donkey or an utter MOREON would inject this shit into their bodies.

  30. Fast Eddy says:

    Could Omicron be the calm before antibody dependent enhancement (ADE) induces a devastating mass cytokine storm?

    new white paper hypothesises a tragic evolutionary pathway the virus may now be forced into due to our “vaccine” foolishness.

    https://twitter.com/AllTheRisks/status/1523758217352060928?utm_source=substack&utm_medium=email

    • MM says:

      What is “our” vaccine foolishness ?
      I have no sense of “me” in this “our” here, sorry!

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Using untested “vaccines” that are not really vaccines, just named vaccines to confuse people. We is the medical authorities.

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Really nice images in this thread.

  31. Fast Eddy says:

    Walgreens: Unvaxxed Testing Positive for Covid-19 at the Lowest Rate; Triple Vaxxed at the Highest

    “Walgreens publishes data on their Covid-19 tests. When people take the test, they are asked about vaccination status. In both of the last two updates, the unvaccinated tested positive at the lowest rate. People with three doses tested positive at the highest rate.”

    https://national-conservative.com/walgreens-unvaxxed-are-testing-positive-for-covid-19-at-the-lowest-rate-triple-vaxxed-at-the-highest/

    VAIDS

    Next up the VAIDS people will be infected with Monkey Pox… normally that is a mild disease that goes away without treatment… but not when your immune system is destroyed by multiple Pfizer injections … tee hee…. let’s have some money sounds shall we

    https://youtu.be/aOTFwqiqlJM

  32. kulmthestatusquo
    kulmthestatusquo says:

    Whether you like it or not, human destiny is determined

    https://greyenlightenment.com/2015/03/27/billionaire-your-life-is-going-to-stink/

    >The left is wrongly interpreting this is mean Charlie Munger is pessimistic about America or as a criticism against the economy, as left wants America to be in decline and no longer exceptional. Actually, what he means is that while America is doing great in terms of technological and intellectual innovation, rising currency, booming stock market, quarter after quarter blowout profits and earnings, huge consumer spending, and political and economic influence – for the vast majority of Americans (those who are not in the financial and cognitive elite), your life will feel like it sucks, even as the economy booms.

    Charlie Munger said it in 2015, before all these mess manifested itself.

    a massive reduction of standard of living for the unnecessariats is inevitable, to save Civilization. Reversing the f-up by those who ‘did their duty’ during the Great War. Sorry, UK patriots, your dads and your granddads perished to make the Hindus great again. That will reverse with interest.

    I wonder who will get rations first when UK faces the food shortages. If those who do not follow the standard British diet behaves like Ramanujan, who demanded vegetarian food when people didn’t have enough to eat, they won’t be the first to be served relief food, I tell you.

    • Cromagnon says:

      The unnecessarits will likely eat Charlie’s children. Idiot thinks civilization will be saved for “ cognitively “ gifted. The arrogance and hubris are mildly entertaining

      • kulmthestatusquo
        kulmthestatusquo says:

        Charlie and his progeny will have plenty of guards to shoot up any number of unnecessariats. All problem solved when they fly to the space, like Interstellar, leaving the unnecessariats behind

        In the movie Interstellar, the chief character only cares about his daughter, who will join the new world. He doesn’t give a shit about his son, who is an unnecessariat, because he knows the son won’t be part of the new world.

    • postkey
      postkey says:

      “53:33 there is not an industrial process that is done in china that can’t be done in north america at a lower cost because
      53:38 our labor is so much more productive our energy is so much cheaper our supply lines are so much shorter . . . “?

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Not really, I am afraid. Making all of these comments without really understanding the energy situation leads to a lot of mistakes.

  33. kulmthestatusquo
    kulmthestatusquo says:

    The Great Reset and all that might be an attempt to reverse what happened in the world after the Great War, and bring the civilization back to normal and make a final run for Singularity.

    Whether you like or not, there are simply too many people who have no place on the world. Unemployable under modern tech. Their labors are not needed, since even menial work need some intelligence to use the latest tools.

    It is happening in Ceylon (whatever name the Ceylonese calls the island doesn’t fly before me – in fact all the native names should be abolished. For me, Jakarta is Batavia, period)

    and in Afghanistan.

    The cold truth is eventually the West’s top 1% , and a few smatterings of peoples who will serve them (for one generation – the male lines will die off and the females will be taken by the 1% if they are suitable enough- there are no Tasmanian male genes remaining. Every single “Tasmanian” still alive all has western Y chromosomes.) will join the Singularity, Civilization 2.0 , Space Conquest and all that, if we are lucky, or we all fall back to Asiatic dictatorship from which Europe had been saved by the timely death of Khan Ogedei in Dec. 11, 1241 before.

    • MM says:

      I am pretty sure that a Mafia-State cooperation due to diminishinhg returns on complexity will not make it to the stars.

    • “… if we are lucky…”

      human extinction is the Singularity.

      and fortunately, no luck required!

      it’s guaranteed!

      hey Singularity, here we come!

      • doomphd – Honolulu – I really hold a doctor of philosophy (phd) in geological sciences and study pretty doomy topics like giant landslides, volcanic eruptions and megatsunamis.
        doomphd says:

        the Singularity is from the human point of view. we’re just another speed bump in the road for Earth, nature and the cosmos.

        • we are all one with the universe.

          we are children of the universe no less than the trees and the stars; we have a right to be here.

          and whether or not it is clear, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

          the amazing history of the glorious human species is wondrously unfolding towards an inevitable and beautiful human extinction.

          two wrongs don’t make a right, but three lefts do.

  34. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    Klaus Schwab and Albert Bourla laugh about the “fanatic group of anti-vaxxers” that went after Pfizer in the past year and the “conspiracy theories” that they have read about themselves
    https://twitter.com/JustLaElisa17/status/1529505113840263175

    • Rodster says:

      Thankfully, Klaus Schwab (mid 80’s) has one foot in the hole. So his days on this planet are numbered.

      • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
        Ed says:

        Kissinger is 98 🙁

      • kulmthestatusquo
        kulmthestatusquo says:

        Not so face.

        Joe Biden in Korea

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_1yzbPMqDxc

        He is walking in the same pace along with the current Prez of Korea and the head of Samsung, significantly younger than him.

        The elites have an arsenal of researchers and doctors to cheat death, sorry.

      • houtskool says:

        Swap, what’s in a name?

        Look at what they do, not what they say.

      • Throw another on the pile

        By GREG MARKLEY

        With the death of former Chair of the Joint Chiefs Gen. Colin Powell in October, I was reminded of the amazing durability of Dick Cheney, the secretary of defense working alongside Powell in the 1991 Gulf War. Cheney had heart attacks in 1978 (at age 37), 1984, 1988, 2000 and 2010. Beyond that, the former U.S. vice president has been in the hospital on and off for coronary heart disease procedures and surgery.

        In March 2012, he received a heart transplant after a seven-hour surgery. His cardiologist of 35 years was asked how long an elderly man could survive after heart work such as Cheney’s.

        ….“In 1978, when Cheney suffered his first heart attack, he received essentially the same treatment President Eisenhower had had in 1955,” says a note from publisher Scribner. “Since then, cardiac medicine has been revolutionized, and Cheney has benefitted from nearly every medical breakthrough. At each juncture, when Cheney faced a new health challenge, the technology was one step ahead of his disease. Cheney’s story is in many ways the story of the evolution of modern cardiac care.”

        Life is not fair….

      • Tsubion says:

        Ok so that puts Klaus in the “about ot leave this plane of existence” gang along with Kissinger, Soros, maybe a Rothschild, throw in a Rockefeller, the Queen, and few other poopy pants crime bosses.

        Then we have the young guns… Gates, Bourla, all the other Big Pharma CEOs, MSM bosses that took the money, national leaders that were blackmailed, and everyone else that’s involved in crimes against humanity.

        What do we do with them?

        I suggest we force them to watch reruns of The View on a loop for the rest of their sad, sorry lives. No one, not even arch criminals can take that much torture.

        Might as well make the end of the world as we know it fun.

        • Fast Eddy says:

          This is exactly why UEP.

          ‘What do we do with them’

          Yes… if we could get our hands on them what would .. we do .. with them.

          Beat them? Skin them alive? Put them in a hole and let them be raped by other men? Water Board them? Behead them? Stick knives up there arses a la gaddafi? Of course we would. The mob is dangerous. And murderous. Always.

          This is exactly why UEP. Remember – Peak Oil leads to the Seneca Cliff… everything you know … EVERYTHING… vapourizes…

          And these are then just old fat men … and multi billion person mob… looking for someone to blame

    • MM says:

      ah, them five stages….
      they laugh at you…

      • Student says:

        They are deceiver minds who play about what they really are as if it were false.
        A normal person would say: ‘they are openly talking about that, so it cannot be true’.
        While it is actually true.
        To understand better the situation, one should thinks what a gambler does when is playing a bluff at poker.

        • MM says:

          From a psychological point of view it is a well established fact that from “bad parents” there will result “bad children” if you allow me to shortcut it here.
          Freud in
          https://www.sigmundfreud.net/civilization-and-its-discontents.jsp

          In an attached letter to Einstein he said sometihng like:
          “They/we(!) will just continue to pass it on from generation to generation and it will be a very long lasting process to alter course”
          Or something like that, anyhow.

          There exist religious and “property managing” groups that force (very young!) children into some kind of world where their ONLY obligation is to KEEP the status quo and that unfortunately damages them for their lives. It “develops” some form of strange psycho patterns that are repeated over generations.
          Arno Gruen has written many good books about that.

          Still some “blood lines” have this drive to “maintain their position” thus educating their offspring exactly in the trap from where they will not be able to “maintain their position” in the long run in the first place, hehe.

          They are in a death loop.

          They will never understand what we mean by the word freedom because they were brought up exactly in a way that they will NEVER have freedom meaning it does not exist in their minds as a grown up.

          I am “a bit” sorry for them but as mirror or david…(?) says:
          it is what it is.

          • Tsubion says:

            I like what you said.

            But I don’t feel sorry for them at all.

            May they all meet Gaddafi’s end at the hands of the mob.

            A natural cleansing and rebalancing awaits.

    • kulmthestatusquo
      kulmthestatusquo says:

      Although I don’t agree with most of his premises, he likes CIvilization and wants it to continue. Unlike Putin, Xi and about 99% of the people living outside of the Western World.

  35. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    How the world’s first all-organic farming nation has led to hunger, riots and economic ruin in Sri Lanka… The consequences have been nothing short of catastrophic, writes TOM LEONARD

    Rajapaksa’s commitment to producing 100 per cent of Sri Lanka’s food organically within a decade was accompanied by a ban on the use of all chemical fertilisers, pesticides and herbicides.

    The consequences have been nothing short of catastrophic. Going organic — the bold, modern vision of the UK’s green lobby — has triggered the devastation of Sri Lanka’s economy, plunging much of its 22 million-strong population into desperate straits.

    The chaos that has engulfed the country — including growing poverty, long queues for essentials, lethal street battles and attacks on the homes of government leaders — is a direct result of this one decision.

    Rajapaksa’s announcement last April that the country’s two million farmers had to go organic overnight — and the disaster that has followed — is a timely lesson for all those who have been swept up by the hype surrounding organic food and its promise not only to improve our health but also to help save the planet.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-10847487/How-worlds-organic-farm-nation-led-hunger-economic-ruin-writes-TOM-LEONARD.html

    • drb753
      drb753 says:

      Cuba managed to do it, but of course it took five years. On a visit to Cuba, I am unconvinced that people’s health has improved all that much, since the food is organic and good tasting, but carb heavy. Obesity can be clearly seen, and animal foods are rationed.

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        Cuba is importing a lot of food. It is not really succeeding without inputs from outside.

        https://www.wfp.org/countries/cuba

        According to the World Food Program, 70 to 80% of Cuba’s food requirements are imported.

        If Sri Lanka could import most of its food, it would do well, too.

    • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
      Ed says:

      How much of their fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides are imported? Has this improved the balance of trade?

    • MM says:

      C’mon. Everybody here knows that it will take ages of hard work to revive a dead soil

      Good news here: It is in principle possible.
      Trust the science!

    • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
      Ed says:

      What is their yield without expensive inputs as a percent of yield with expensive inputs?

    • kulmthestatusquo
      kulmthestatusquo says:

      There is no country called Sri Lanka

      It is Ceylon. It was Ceylon for centuries.

      Whatever names put in by those who can’t maintain themselves should be ignored.

  36. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    The Food Crisis Is Bad. US Crop Insurance Makes It Worse.

    Food prices are soaring and worse may be on the way.

    The US Department of Agriculture reported that there were only 3.7 days suitable for farm field work in Minnesota last week due to unusually cold and wet weather. That kind of bad weather has meant that only 11% of Minnesota’s spring wheat crop was in the ground as of Sunday, compared to 100% at the same time last year.

    It’s not just Minnesota, either. Across the Midwest, one of the world’s most fruitful breadbaskets, farmers are well behind their usual planting pace. If the rain and cold continues, some crops won’t be planted at all.

    That’s bad. Now the US government is making it worse. Thanks to incentives built into federally subsidized crop insurance programs, some farmers may soon find it more profitable to file insurance claims and keep productive land idle than to produce wheat, corn and soybeans, even though prices are surging. It’s unclear how many acres could be affected; potentially, it’s millions. With deadlines looming for farmers to make decisions, it’s urgent for policy makers to shift the incentives toward planting.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/the-food-crisis-is-bad-us-crop-insurance-makes-it-worse/2022/05/25/d307965a-dc1e-11ec-bc35-a91d0a94923b_story.html

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Interesting point!

      Government programs often sound good, but they often lead to perverse incentives, like choosing not to plant late, because the government payout looks enticing.

      Another government program with perverse incentives (at least in the past; I am not sure how much the program has been fixed) is flood insurance. At least at one time, the funds could be used to build back in the same flooded area. In fact, at one time, it was possible to buy the insurance even after a high-water warning had gone out, because of a known surge of water upstream. Needless to say, private insurers have not been interested in getting into this market.

    • drb753
      drb753 says:

      well, we were in a drought in the upper midwest, now the weather has turned wet, and this is somehow bad.

    • Fast Eddy says:

      If the rain and cold continues, some crops won’t be planted at all.

      This is why i burn coal – it’s a losing battle though

  37. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    Modelling HIV/AIDS and monkeypox co-infection

    “During the last two decades, reports on emerging human monkeypox outbreaks in Africa and North America have reminded us that beside the eradicated smallpox there are other pox viruses that have great potential to harm people. A deterministic model for the co-infection of HIV/AIDS and monkeypox is formulated and analysed. The endemic equilibria are shown to be locally and globally asymptotically stable using the Centre Manifold theory and the Lyapunov function approach, respectively. Analysis of the basic reproduction numbers and numerical simulations suggest that an increase in the number of monkeypox in the animal species results in an increase of the number of people having monkeypox. Threshold conditions that determine the competitive outcomes of the two diseases are provided. Furthermore, numerical simulations using a set of reasonable parameter values support the claim that HIV infection greatly enhances monkeypox infection and vice versa.”
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0096300312002743

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      In other words, if your immune system is already damaged, you are more likely to get monkeypox.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas!

        I wonder what Bossche thinks of this…

        Monkey pox is really gross… so I think it would be a good choice if your goal was to frighten people and ensure they do not venture out to kill rape and pillage…. (at least those who are not dead from the pox because they wrecked their immune systems by injecting the experiment)

        Oh and who wants to eat someone with blisters all over their body… EU….

        It’s beginning to come together now… Poxxed Zombies…if this theory is correct then we are now officially in the End Game…. we just need the pox to spread widely….

    • MM says:

      Moderna on their website talk about their mRNA vaccine being a platform or explicitly an operating system.
      SARS-Cov-2 is just the viral complement operating system.
      Bill: Head of the plugin.

      • Fast Eddy says:

        Yes of course they’d talk about this … if they wanted to distract the herd from the real intent.

        • MM says:

          The dsitraction is in:
          “viral platform” not being mentioned.

          To make it easy: The UEP Toolkit.

          If I should invest, I would want to know!

    • Fast Eddy says:

      Bingo! You have smashed the internet!!!

      When do we start to see VAIDS patients dying of The Pox on the Tee Vee???? All pussy and blistered… EEEEEUUUUU…..let me tell you a few photos of THAT … and there will be no need to ask people to lock down… they’ll triple pad lock themselves in … and anyone who comes near they’ll shoot dead.

      Whoever thought this shit up is a diabolical genius DB … hip hip hooray ….

      I don’t want to catch that festering pussy shit — even though it won’t kill me (cuz immune system I have)…. so I will lock down for sure… and put a sign up Dangerous Dogs + Many Guns and Ammo in this compound … Stay Away you Pussy Diseased F789s… We Shoot to Kill (STK)…

      I prefer starvation. Or maybe running the bat mobile into the rocks. I also have long hose that can attach to the exhaust to kill the rabbits in their dens… I could repurpose that and run in into the car … I prefer Fentanyl though… drift away…)

      Must avoid the pussy pox… EUUU.

      • MM says:

        At least it comes in true color to my screen in real time.

        Oh man, we waited about 30 years to get rid of that damn black and white TV and another 30 for the instant messenger.

    • Tsubion says:

      Just ridiculous computer models which of course are silly when it comes to Globbly Wobbly but suddenly they are reliable and accurate when it comes to mythical virus terrorism. Hilarious!

  38. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    Alibaba Group president J. Michael Evans boasts at the World Economic Forum about the development of an “individual carbon footprint tracker” to monitor what you buy, what you eat, and where/how you travel.
    https://twitter.com/AndrewLawton/status/1529045188764921856

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Creating “individual carbon footprint trackers” sounds like a way for WEF companies to make money. If there is not enough to go around, the wealthy can make money while others are limited as much as possible.

  39. Michael Le Merchant
    Michael Le Merchant says:

    Things heard at WEF: “We need a re-calibration of human rights like freedom of speech…”
    https://twitter.com/bennyjohnson/status/1529111482390171648

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      Wow! “We need a re-calibration of human rights like freedom of speech.”

      • MM says:

        Who is “we”`?
        What Do I “need”?
        Where “re-” should I go ?
        What was “calibrated” here in the first place?
        What qualifies as “human”
        What is a “right”, why should I need that?
        What is “freedom”?

        I do not have “Speech” on my computer screen, sorry!

    • Bobby says:

      We need a re-calibration of bigots ability to express opinions without thinking

    • Fast Eddy says:

      Head fake there… it’s all about extermination .. they won’t say that at Davos (except behind closed doors)

    • Fast Eddy says:

      The PR Team is clever — see – they suspended this guy – it must be true what is being said at the WEF — otherwise they’d not ban him… obviously they’d never have said this to begin with at the WEF if it was true…

      It’s all a massive head fake.

      It’s like hot mic ‘gaffs’… those are staged…

  40. hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
    hillcountry says:

    GF:
    I am new to trying to understand the energy world at this level. These type of articles are fantastic.
    Currently trying to make sure I understand the 321 Crack Spread point. The above chart would indicate refiners are making record margins with today’s diesel and gas prices? Then the problem is that supply cannot be ramped up due to supply constraints, regulation constraints, investment costs for new refineries, etc.? Basically demand is high and there is little to no way to increase the supply?

    Reply
    author
    Doomberg May 24
    Correct. They are making ~$40-50 a barrel of gross margin per barrel of oil that costs ~$110. For heavy industry, these types of margins are unheard of and unsustainable. In this case, high prices can’t trigger new long-term supply, although it does induce refineries to run as hard as they can in the short term.

    • ivanislav says:

      Link to original post? No data, hard to interpret.

      • hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
        hillcountry says:

        sorry about that, could have copied more. Doomberg’s substack is paywalled so I didn’t link it,

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      The crack spread, in general, measures the size of the margin available to refiners for refining crude oil into refined products. The question is how to weight the different products that a refinery makes, in calculating this margin. In other words, the calculation is looking at the value of the mix of outputs versus cost of the crude oil input.

      According to this link:

      https://www.cmegroup.com/education/articles-and-reports/introduction-to-crack-spreads.html

      In a typical refinery, gasoline output is approximately double that of distillate fuel oil (the cut of the barrel that contains diesel and jet fuel). This refining ratio has prompted many market participants to concentrate on 3:2:1 crack spreads — three crude oil futures contracts versus two gasoline futures contracts and one ULSD [ultra low sulphur diesel] futures contract.

      This is a recent article talking about how the high crack spread is affecting refineries:

      Promise of Profits Has US Fuelmakers Shifting Into a Higher Gear -Bloomberg
      https://energiesnet.com/promise-of-profits-has-us-fuelmakers-shifting-into-a-higher-gear-bloomberg/

      It talks refineries wanting to increase production as much as possible because of the high crack spread, but the lack of refinery capacity and the lack of imported fuel (including from Russia) being bottlenecks to increasing production. Also, many refinery outages have been occurring, some related to lack of electricity. Furthermore,

      “Some [refineries] may have shut prematurely because of cash crunches,” Auers said of refinery closures. “But they’re not going to be building new capacity. There are energy transition forces causing people to look to the future.”

      In my opinion, the reason why oil companies (as opposed to refineries) cannot ramp up oil supply despite high crack spreads are multiple:

      [1] The crack spread is to a significant extent deceptive. Governments will take a big piece of this as taxes. Governments of oil exporters have been starved for funds for years because of low oil prices.

      [2] In the oil industry, it takes years and years to do anything involving new production. Permits are needed. New wells need to be put in place. New pipelines may need to be put in place. By the time this is done, history shows that the high 3-2-1 margins are likely not to be available because high oil prices tend to push economies into recession.

      [3] The areas where the cost of oil production is low have already been drilled. New areas of expansion, such as outside of the sweet spots in the shale formations, are expected to be high cost.

      [4] Drilling in shale formations produces an oil mix that includes very little distillate (used for diesel and jet fuel). Thus, it is not helpful in fixing the distillate problem. More oil from the oil sands in Canada or heavy oil from Venezuela might be helpful.

      [5] As noted above, US refinery capacity is not really available. If hurricanes hit, they are likely to reduce refinery capacity further because of electricity outages and the stoppage of offshore production.

      [6] There are all kinds of supply line problems. Pipe for drilling has been mentioned as being in short supply. Trained workers are not necessarily available in the area where drilling might be done.

      [7] I read an article recently saying that bonuses for oil company presidents (such as for drilling in oil shale) used to be based on the amount of production. Now, they are written based on the amount that will be returned to shareholders.

      • hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
        hillcountry says:

        thanks for the details Gail, troubling though they be, Makes me wonder how many planners are sweating bullets going into hurricane season

  41. Alex says:

    “The current plan of central banks is to raise interest rates aggressively.”
    Nah, their plan is to talk tough and do little. First they were lying that there was no inflation. Then they were lying that although there was some inflation, it was transitory, so who cares. Then they were lying that they were fighting the 8% official inflation with a 0.5% rate hike.

    “With all parts of the economy benefiting from the lower interest rates […], it is easy to see why lower interest rates would tend to stimulate new investment and drive up demand for commodities.”
    We are long past the point where lowering interest rates could stimulate genuine investments. Both in the U.S. and in China, a $1 of debt creates only about $0.4 of GDP growth. What is the best use for debt that the big profit-making corporations can come up with? They buy back their own stocks. And technoponzis are “selling ten-dollar bills for eight bucks” (Peter Schiff).

    Look guys, if a morbidly obese person went on a diet and started exercising, Malthusians and Seneca-cliffers would be moaning “peak fat.”

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      I think that you have a good point: The plan of central bankers is to talk tough and do little.

      If the US can do this first, perhaps the US$ can rise above other currencies. The US can perhaps corner some of the energy supply that is available. Thus, if the world economy goes down, the US can do less badly than other countries.

    • Replenish says:

      Good catch Alex. Thanks for pushing those buttons. Peak Fat, lol. Hopefully we can help you with some of your blindspots as well.

      • Sam says:

        I’m not sure how do you stay afloat without getting wet… the problem with collapse is that there is a lot of things that you can’t game plan or expect… when the system is so complex there is a lot that can go wrong…. And will go wrong.

        • houtskool says:

          Indeed. First slowly, then suddenly. When we start seeing more empty shelves pics on instagram it can go very fast. Not that i look at instagram though. You’ll be far too late. And way too stupid 😬

          • Fast Eddy says:

            Anyone who wants to hang around long enough for the Fire Works… should consider stockpiling big time if the Monkey Pox turns out to be the Real Deal and lots of people start dying….

            Things will move rapidly once that begins…. we can start counting in weeks the remaining time.

            Keep in mind Monkey Pox could just be another head fake… Show Me The Deaths.

            • Tsubion says:

              So called Monkey Pox is a rash and fever caused by toxic reaction to poppers and other drug abuse found in the gaaay community.

              This is very well understood and explained in hundreds of books since the eighties with that other fake outbreak that you may have heard of.

              They used the disease that already existed to create fear among the simple-minded and then carried out mass testing to acquire false positives. The “carriers” were immediately put on harsh treatment protocol using AZT.

              AZT destroys immunity and literally kills the host. Notch up the mass deaths. Rinse and repeat.

              Understand?

              Sound familiar?

              And who was behind that scam of the century? None other than one Anthony Fauci.

              He’s still at it. And will continue until he’s stopped. And BIg Pharma will replace him with another… Bill Gates… and so on.

              There is no “spread.”

              Contagion was thoroughly and conclusively debunked a hundred years ago. And boy did they try their damndest to prove it. Hundreds of studies (all buried by Big Pharma) came back negative. Nope. Nosiree. No contagion.

              You can tell that to your heros Bosch and Yeadon et al. I’m sure they’ll give you a convincing whitewash story. And tell you that all the debunkers are cultists when they are members of the biggest cult of all.

              If viral contagion was a real thing… there wouldn’t be any life on this planet. Life cannot exist without the microbiome. It is a harmonious self-balancing system.

              Disease is caused by toxins and deficiencies.

            • JMS says:

              I absolutely agree with Tsubion. After having seen the video “HIV=AIDS, Fauci’s first fraud” it is impossible to continue to believe in the CDC, in the medical class, in bigpharma and in the official version about AIDS.

        • Fast Eddy says:

          If doomies want to identify blind spots then take the Fast Eddy challenge now … no petrol no electricity no buying stuff – for a week….

          Funny how not a single DP has done that …. they will say -oh that’s easy I could do it … but they don’t… and we know why…

          It would burst their mass psychosis… kinda like having a CovIDIOT having a heart attack and going blind minutes after the booster

    • Yes, good point…Like the boy crying the big bad wolf (inflation)…
      To the Moon 🌑…
      We are like a crew in an airliner that fell asleep in the bridge with a full passenger count..
      Just woke up to the fact we overshoot our designated airport of San Francisco and headed out into the Pacific Ocean and realized we went too far outward to turn around the plane ro land on tera firma..so what do we do now? lie like hell so not to cause panic in the gallery of those on board… We are going to crash…it’s a certainly…per Jay Hanson of Dieoff

      • MM says:

        So what? Read the last 10+ years of OFW quick???
        Parachuting might work for an individual.
        Turning the plane will not wotrk for all…

  42. Fast Eddy says:

    Because high schoolers really need to see a drag queen in high heels and a swimming costume as he flaunts his tiny tucked away pecker and his defluffed chocolate starfish to kids.

    https://theiowastandard.com/drag-show-hits-stage-at-ankeny-high-school-on-same-day-iowa-house-republicans-kill-esa-proposal/

    • there must be a connection there

      itll take me a while to figure out what it is

      something to do with a low scoring rate i guess

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      I got to thinking:

      I broke away from conservatism years ago, when I got married but didn’t change my last name. This was related to another thing that was a break from conservativism: a woman being highly educated and going into one of many fields that had previously been dominated by men.

      More recently, when my daughter got married, she chose to marry another woman. This was a further step away from conservativism. My daughter dresses in a feminine manner; her spouse has a fairly masculine haircut and wears clothes that either sex could wear. They are both very fine women. They both kept their original last names after marriage.

      In fact, I have a sister who is married to another woman. They are both are fine women. They dress in women’s sportswear. I also have a female cousin who has a long term relationship with another woman. She is a pastor in a Methodist Church.

      Each generation wants to move a step beyond where their parents were. If their older relatives have already paved a path, they feel a need to step beyond it. I suppose drag queens are a step beyond.

      • Ed – I am interested in energy issues.
        Ed says:

        Gail, maybe it is more like diffusion. One generation some go liberal some go conservative some stay put. The next generation some from each group go in a random direction. I do not see a consistent driving force towards and position.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          You might be right.

          I have two different sets of relatives who have homeschooled their children. They have gone more the conservative route. Both are members of religious groups that believe the Bible is literally true.

          One of my groups of homeschooling relatives is anti-vaxx. The other is pro-vaxx. The latter group has a dentist in their group. The dentist feels that vaccinated patients are more likely to make appointments. She also thinks that the vaccine will keep her from catching a severe case (or perhaps, catching it at all). Being out of work for a while with COVID would be a disaster for a single-dentist practice.

      • MM says:

        The differenciation between form and content is a very old struggle.
        I clearly see it in the eye of the beholder.
        Art censoring predates a lot of other censoring!
        “this thing on our public museum. No guys! ”
        Even if it is only for a 3 months exhibition.

        Are you experienced ?

      • Fast Eddy says:

        I think this is very very very different from a same sex relationship.

        Drag Queens in primary schools is surely a step too far. What merit is there in that?

        Where do we from here – how about strippers in the classroom– even better – let’s normalize po rn stars – after all the kids are all watching them on their phones already … nice to meet some of these role models in person …

        Technique is important so why not have them teach the kids…. the curriculum in most schools is already advising primary students to use vegetables if they don’t have money to buy proper s e x toys… the next obvious step as the authorities look bring 8 year olds up to speed is to show them how it’s done….

        And for careers day why not invite reps from these websites into the classroom to discuss the option of working as a prostitute https://www.sugardatingsites.org/ Of course we don’t refer to them as prostitutes – they are ‘sugar babies’… sounds so much better. This needs to become a legit career for women… there should be no negative connotations with teens shagging father figures for $$$ – it’s a great way to get ahead — and it’s possible to avoid paying taxes!

        Perhaps norm could visit with his blow up doll and perform his show and tell act?

        I took a world religions course in university – wrote a paper arguing that western societies in particular which pride themselves on Judeo christian principles have strayed increasingly in the direction of the principles of Satanism (look up Satanism for what they espouse… basically self gratification..) giving into to populist demands….

        Too many of your followers demand abortion rights — ok – change the rules and allow murder…too many of your followers want to enjoy group se x swinging parties etc etc etc… no problem — that’s all cool now with the new rules… contraception – all good … self gratification is what we are all about at this church!

        Not that I particularly give a f789 because I have been a hard core atheist since grade 9. These were just my observations of the trajectory of our JC society… that so many cherish…. they just change the rules when they become inconvenient … and without a doubt even back then they were much close to the teachings of Satanism than Christianity (or any other religion).

        Got a B for that paper … the professor was a nice guy but he was also a minister… apparently the truth hurts to much to give the A+ that deserved…. or better still a PHD…. I suspect he referred to me as the heretic…

        • MM says:

          You start off with same sex relationships, get over to drags and then to abortion.
          Sorry, but ist it this what you call the path to the UEP ?

          • Fast Eddy says:

            I have not included any of that in UEP … that just complicates it…

            I could easily add another paragraph summary of how we are in the Sodom and Gomorrah Phase of civilization– twerking — soft core po-rn on prime time teevee along with random profanity…. Justin Bieber…. Facebook… likes… tweets… memememememe…. Justin Bieber….. hard core po-rn available to anyone with a phone …. swap left/right to forni-cate….

            Every day we sink deeper into the depths of stoooopidity, filth and depravity — UEP is the natural outcome of a situation like this … there is no solution so it’s best just to exterminate it … incinerate the entire wicked beast… burn it to a cinder.

            UEP is… the … Final Solution.

          • Fast Eddy says:

            BTW – a 40 year old man recently told me he was a big fan of Miley Cyrus…. shaking my head… I asked why — because she does whatever she wants and she does not care what anyone thinks…

            I suggested that perhaps what she does is not what she wants but what her PR people believe the MOREONS want – because of the polling they have done. I suggested that her Twerking performance was not her decision — and that maybe doing soft p o rn like that on a show that very young impressionable kids is maybe not the great message to send out there….

            You gotta wonder how many 12 yr olds are twerking behind the dumpster with 16 yr olds after that… of course that’s when they are not uploading nude selfies (with toys) onto Snap chat….

            Every generation sinks us a little closer to the bottom of the barrel … into the swill… into the filth….

            Sugar Babies hahaha…. if we don’t UEP this mess — it will be the norm to pay your way through college by allowing geriatric men with money to mount up…

            This is clearly a bad direction https://swimsuit.si.com/swimnews/meet-your-cover-model-2022-yumi-nu Glamourizing morbid obesity cannot be justified on any level

            • This, like most of “Western” “popular” culture is aimed at an audience of high-income women who are not married and who may think they are lgbt. Obesity is used by many lesbians as a wall, literally, to keep straight men away. Let’s not pretend that there isn’t a concerted effort to impose LGBT social norms on straight people is not currently occurring.

          • i probably missed a trick here

            but

            if one is in a same sex relationship, why/how would one need an abortion

            similarly the link with ‘drag’—is there one?

            or are you advocating conformity within defined limits.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          My impression is that the article is about high schoolers, (ages 15-18), not grade schoolers. I don’t really appreciate this, whatever the age.

  43. hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
    hillcountry says:

    The ‘Loop Current’ that fuels Monster Hurricanes

    The Gulf of Mexico stats are looking like 2005 (Katrina)

    https://theconversation.com/bad-news-for-the-2022-hurricane-season-the-loop-current-a-fueler-of-monster-storms-is-looking-a-lot-like-it-did-in-2005-the-year-of-katrina-183197

    Went over to Wiki to see what the oil infrastructure damage was. (Reportedly a loss of 8 million gallons of oil). Ran across this interesting bit about loss of trees.

    Katrina also produced massive tree loss along the Gulf Coast, particularly in Louisiana’s Pearl River Basin and among bottomland hardwood forests. Before the storm, the standard mortality rate for the area’s trees was 1.9%, but this interval increased to 20.5% by the end of 2006.[105] Delayed mortality as an effect of the storm continued with rates up to 5% until 2011.[106] This significant loss in biomass caused greater decay and an increase in carbon emissions. For example, by 2006 the
    decreased biomass in bottomland hardwood forests contributed an amount of carbon which equated to roughly 140% of the net annual U.S. carbon sink in forest trees.[107]

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      We need to expect a few years with lots of hurricanes. We need to expect that it will become more and more difficult to fix the power outages and other problems, such as washed out roads, that will occur after the hurricanes come through.

      I don’t know how insurance companies can handle this. They can sell high-priced policies, if states like Florida will allow this. But they cannot necessarily follow through with reconstructing what was lost in the hurricane. Any reconstruction will be very slow and high-cost.

      • hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
        hillcountry says:

        Add the lead-time for utility transformers – yikes!!!

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Right!

  44. hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
    hillcountry says:

    Pete Lincoln is doing some good digging on his Substack. https://tinyurl.com/2s38za4d

    Among his musings, he runs across this from 2012.

    https://anh-usa.org/fsmb-behind-the-brutal-attacks-on-integrative-practitioners/

    He writes: “Well that;s disturbing. Some Pharma backed group , made up of unelected people that seems to carry a lot of weight with State Medical Boards is calling the shots on how a Doctor may care for his patients, even in Red States”

    • drb753
      drb753 says:

      No surprise there. I think in 2005 I took a taxi to Detroit airport. The driver was a former dentist who kept saying mercury in fillings is toxic. He was eventually stripped of his licence to practice. Now in, say, Ann Arbor every dentist offers fillings replacement. I gave a large tip to this honorable man, but obviously the intimidation was done. It did not take long for me in 2020 to figure out what these people were up to.

      • hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
        hillcountry says:

        About a decade prior I had my amalgams replaced by an old country dentist who had read the Hal Huggins and George Meinig stuff and I think he even met them at some point. He was kind of loopy from mercury fumes I guess. He’d wander down to Ann Arbor to give a mini-lecture now and then. As part of the process he had his 12-year old daughter holding the stem of a mini shop vac pretty close to my open mouth to capture the fumes. What a hoot. I don’t recall that he put a dam in, but that could it be the swallowed mercury talking I guess.

    • hillcountry – retired electronics manufacturing engineer
      hillcountry says:

      One doctor comments on the above linked article about the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB).l His government testimony (linked) is approximately the same as his comment here.

      Bruce Dooley, M.D.
      Kudos!
      I am so glad you finally came out with this article after my email discussions with your staff writer. This private organization, formed in 1912, a very curious time regarding the formation of the Federal Reserve (a private bank consortium), John Rockefeller investing in the fledgling pharmaceutical industry, and the Flexner report wiping out homeopathy.

      My report on my investigation into this shadow organization to the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine in 2000 is found at this site

      http://govinfo.library.unt.edu/whccamp/meetings/transcript_12_4_00.html

      This is indeed the “beast” at the heart of repressing any therapies and physicians that promote health and these non-patentable, proven nutraceutical therapies.

      I sat in astonishment at two of the FSMB annual meetings (in posh settings) where “delegates” from each state VOTED on electronic ballet machines on various proposals submitted by the FSMB. I thought to myself “hmmm. this is a private organization, how can a LAW be created?”

      Well, then the states medical boards were given a copy of this new “law” to take and incorporate into their state. Very clever method to control doctors by threatening their means of a livelihood…their license to practice medicine. Most doctors have NEVER even heard of the FSMB. Hence they are “shadow masters” controlling behind the scenes with a massive staff over 200 employees in Euless, TX.

      Here’s the final irony, they OWN and write the National Medical Boards and also own the Physician Disciplinary Data Bank in which, if a doctor is disciplined by their state medical board, an un-expungable (forever) black mark is set against them and if they apply to another state for a license, it is brought up and they are likely refused a license to practice in that state.

      So how does an organization with two huge double storied buildings (Google Earth this address: 400 Fuller Wiser Road, Suite 300 Euless, TX 76039) maintain a full-time staff which includes doctors and lawyers exist on annual membership dues of $10,000/year from each state medical board?

      Well, as a private organization they do not have to reveal their finances. But if all the physicians that have been attacked by their medical boards formed an alliance with a class-action law firm and filed such a suit, then under “discovery” we’d surely see that they are supported from…well…stay tuned…or can you just guess?!
      From New Zealand
      05/15/2012 at 7:34 pm

      • Hubbs says:

        In my memoirs entitled “My Medical Legal Back Pages,” I made the point that the state medical boards are comprised of doctors who are appointed by the state governor or Who engage in very little extra practice of medicine. They are the presidents of the state medical schools, public health officials, psychiatrists etc.These are political appointments. State Medical Boards also enjoy sovereign immunity which means the hapless doctor cannot sue the state medical board for malfeasance. Time-honored statutes and rules of evidence are often ignored. Even the standard for medical malpractice, that of falling below the standard of care for a physician in your own specialty is ignored. In my case #467, 1994, the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure had originally recognized in its minutes that as an orthopedic surgeon, I was to be held to the standards of my own specialty, orthopedic surgery and not an anesthesiologist. When the board’s own preapproved panel orthopedic expert thoroughly and totally exonerated me, the Kentucky medical board switched back to the anesthesia standard. I took the hit when the operating room nurse in premeditated fashion which violated all hospital and nursing standards of conduct and care, directed an unauthorized tech to do her job. I was unaware that this prohibited transfer of duty had occurred behind my back.The tech, not sure what she was supposed to get, selected a lethal medication. This is why these time-honored rules of conduct we’re established. To prevent this very kind of event from happening. A 21-year-old man died on the table as a result of a lethal injection. It was undisputed that I had ordered the proper drug and to be delivered to me in the operating room. The operating room nurse had recorded my order, written it down on her scrubs and read it back to me verbatim as is the standard for scrubbed surgeons in the operating room. The Scarlet Letter of a license suspension will haunt a physician for the rest of his career,
        in my case, what was left of it. I became a medical refugee unable to secure any decent position even though I had excellent references, graduated in the top 10% of my medical school class etc. The Kentucky medical board had an agenda, Due to the fact that it’s public image was under attack primarily from and I’m going story that that the president of the Kentucky Medical Association Dr Fred Rainey , a practitioner in my town, was discovered to have been sodomizing young boys in his practice for 20 years and had raped both of his babysitters. The public was outraged and demanded doctors, scalps be served up immediately. I was the first MD in Kentucky to have his license suspended on the basis of a single isolated medical malpractice event. It’s all about politics.

        • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
          Gail Tverberg says:

          Usually, a malpractice event is not enough to take away a person’s license.

          My impression (working in medical malpractice insurance) was that these boards didn’t really do much to stop doctors who had cooked up their own new surgical technique that really didn’t work, or who had drug problems.

          Maybe what they were mostly are interested in is competition from other practitioners (such as chiropractors and nutritionists) and things that would cut back on the sale of high-priced drugs.

        • Fast Eddy says:

          Association Dr Fred Rainey , a practitioner in my town, was discovered to have been sodomizing young boys in his practice for 20 years and had raped both of his babysitters.

          Did he retrain as a priest… he is perfect for that job

      • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
        Gail Tverberg says:

        This is really strange. Even more so that the central banks being owned by the other banks. Their real motive is to make money for the banks!

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      This substack report has quite a bit about the State Medical Boards, their connection with Big Pharma, and their role in the oxycontin problem.

      Another point that the substack post talks about is the rise in the percentage of pre-term births in 2021.

  45. Fast Eddy says:

    How do we know any of these ridiculous videos are not stich ups? https://t.me/TommyRobinsonNews/35976

    There is NO way to verify

    • Gail Tverberg – My name is Gail Tverberg. I am an actuary interested in finite world issues - oil depletion, natural gas depletion, water shortages, and climate change. Oil limits look very different from what most expect, with high prices leading to recession, and low prices leading to financial problems for oil producers and for oil exporting countries. We are really dealing with a physics problem that affects many parts of the economy at once, including wages and the financial system. I try to look at the overall problem.
      Gail Tverberg says:

      From the article:

      As the U.S. budget deficit shrinks amid robust tax revenues, the Treasury will have to aggressively shrink bill issuance through Sept. 30, analysts said.

      “A sharp decline in bill supply will push much of the money fund cash into the Fed’s RRP, draining bank reserves by more than $1 trillion this year,” said Joseph Abate, managing director, fixed income research, at Barclays.

      He expects bill supply to shrink 15% between April 1 and Sept. 30.

      “It’s really a double whammy on the front end because of too much demand and not enough supply, leaving the RRP facility as the option of last resort for many investors,” said TD’s Goldberg.

      Maybe too many ways of slowing the economy at once are taking place.

  46. Fast Eddy says:

    The UK’s National Health Service (NHS) has recently edited their Monkeypox page (https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/monkeypox/) to alter the narrative to make monkey pox sound scarier.

    Up until a few days ago, according to archived links (https://web.archive.org/web/20220507132152/https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/monkeypox/), the Monkeypox page said this, regarding person-to-person tranmission [emphasis added]:

    “It’s very uncommon to get monkeypox from a person with the infection because it does not spread easily between people…”

    …THIS HAS NOW BEEN TOTALLY REMOVED

    Secondly, they’ve removed this paragraph, which was present up until at least November of 2021 (https://web.archive.org/web/20211102221822/https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/monkeypox/) (and maybe much more recently, there are no archives between November and May) [emphasis added]:

    “[Monkeypox] is usually a mild illness that will get better on its own without treatment. Some people can develop more serious symptoms, so patients with monkeypox in the UK are cared for in specialist hospitals…”

    The new “treatment” paragraph reads [again, emphasis added]…

    “Treatment for monkeypox aims to relieve symptoms. The illness is usually mild and most people recover in 2 to 4 weeks […] You may need to stay in a specialist hospital, so your symptoms can be treated and to prevent the infection spreading to other people…”

    So, they’re already blatantly changing the story. Why are they doing that?…

    Read full article…
    https://off-guardian.org/2022/05/24/the-nhs-just-edited-their-monkeypox-page-to-make-it-scarier/

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