Category Archives: Energy policy

How Energy Transition Models Go Wrong

I have written many posts relating to the fact that we live in a finite world. At some point, our ability to extract resources becomes constrained. At the same time, population keeps increasing. The usual outcome when population is too high for resources is “overshoot and collapse.” But this is not a topic that the politicians or central bankers or oligarchs who attend the World Economic Forum dare to talk about.

Instead, world leaders find a different problem, namely climate change, to emphasize above other problems. Conveniently, climate change seems to have some of the same solutions as “running out of fossil fuels.” So, a person might think that an energy transition designed to try to fix climate change would work equally well to try to fix running out of fossil fuels. Unfortunately, this isn’t really the way it works.

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Posted in Energy policy | Tagged fossil fuels, low oil prices, solar energy, wind energy | 3,781 Comments

Why a Great Reset Based on Green Energy Isn’t Possible

It seems like a reset of an economy should work like a reset of your computer: Turn it off and turn it back on again; most problems should be fixed. However, it doesn’t really work that way. Let’s look at … Continue reading

Posted in Energy policy | Tagged EROEI, EROI, low oil prices, peak oil, solar energy, wind energy | 2,650 Comments

Economies won’t be able to recover after shutdowns

Citizens seem to be clamoring for shutdowns to prevent the spread of COVID-19. There is one major difficulty, however. Once an economy has been shut down, it is extremely difficult for the economy to recover back to the level it … Continue reading

Posted in Energy policy, Financial Implications, News Related Post | Tagged central banks, coronavirus, Covid-19, low oil prices | 4,744 Comments

Do the World’s Energy Policies Make Sense?

The world today has a myriad of energy policies. One of them seems to be to encourage renewables, especially wind and solar. Another seems to be to encourage electric cars. A third seems to be to try to move away … Continue reading

Posted in Energy policy, Financial Implications | Tagged carbon dioxide emissions, CO2 emissions | 1,380 Comments

How Renewable Energy Models Can Produce Misleading Indications

The energy needs of the world’s economy seem to be easy to model. Energy consumption is measured in a variety of different ways including kilowatt hours, barrels of oil equivalent, British thermal units, kilocalories and joules. Two types of energy … Continue reading

Posted in Alternatives to Oil, Energy policy, Financial Implications | Tagged electricity transmission, EROEI, intermittent renewables, solar, wind energy | 1,605 Comments